Microsoft Certification Readiness Tool

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by David, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. David

    David Guest

    Hi, I just took the Certification Readiness tool on the
    Microsoft website for the MCDST exam. I scored a 67 which
    was below what the graft showed as 80 as a passing score.
    I got an email than confirming the 67 score. The email
    stated if I scored above 40 I was ready to take the test.
    I'm a little confused. I've been taking the Measure Up
    test and scoring around 70 usually and studying the
    Microsoft training materials. What's your opinion? Am I
    ready or should I try to get above that "80" mark?
    Thanks. (this was for 271)
     
    David, Feb 4, 2005
    #1
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  2. David

    Jason Guest

    David,

    Your question is really the tip of a much larger issue that speaks to the
    purpose behind certification. However, the short answer to your question is
    this: Your exam "readiness" should be exactly that...a measure of how ready
    you are to pass the exam. Does a 60% achieve that passing score? No. Is
    there a chance you will pass the exam anyway? Sure there is...it all is a
    matter of your own comfort level and your willingness to gamble. Is it
    worth the $125 gamble to pass?

    I personally am very confidant of my technical abilities but am also very
    uneasy when it comes to gambling on certification readiness. I would rather
    overstudy than understudy. While losing $100 at the local Texas Hold 'Em
    tourney is not something I do willingly, I do that more willingly than spend
    $125 on a cert I am not sure I am ready for. Why bet on your knowledge when
    you can know it all?

    The larger issue here though is to identify the purpose behind your
    certification. For many at the entry level, certs are seen as the key to
    entry. Others see it as a justification for other ends. First you must
    ask yourself why you are taking the exam. Is this to establish your
    credentials, or to support them? In other words, do you want to GET a job,
    or do you want to KEEP a job? Or, quite possibly, is this simply for
    bragging rights amongst peers? In the first case, a mere Microsoft
    credential is not a specific means to an end. No single cert can GET you a
    job as employers like to see a certain measure of experience. In the second
    case, the MCDST can be invaluable in proving your worth and value to an
    existing employer. "As the lone MCDST in your organization, I can fulfill
    all the helpdesk needs for up to x number of users [whatever 'x' happens to
    be]". Just be prepared to back up your cert credential with honest to
    goodness knowledge and experience in this second case. In the third case,
    for bragging rights, do you want to simply pass it, or do you want to be the
    highest scorer in your peer group? For the egoist, the score is more
    important than the pass, and scoring 60% will not give anyone bragging
    rights.

    All said, it does seem as though in the first and last of these cases, you
    would be better served to study more. In the second, my only consideration
    would be whether it is company-funded or not (the exam). If it is,
    sure....take a shot. If not...study more.

    If you are funding the exam yourself, the ultimate 'gambling' question to
    ask is "Am I willing to risk $125 on my knowledge of this material?" If you
    are, then take the exam. If you are not, study more. Hope this helps

    Jason
    (Psst.....study more.)

    "David" <> wrote in message
    news:02f001c50a55$b2403f20$...
    > Hi, I just took the Certification Readiness tool on the
    > Microsoft website for the MCDST exam. I scored a 67 which
    > was below what the graft showed as 80 as a passing score.
    > I got an email than confirming the 67 score. The email
    > stated if I scored above 40 I was ready to take the test.
    > I'm a little confused. I've been taking the Measure Up
    > test and scoring around 70 usually and studying the
    > Microsoft training materials. What's your opinion? Am I
    > ready or should I try to get above that "80" mark?
    > Thanks. (this was for 271)
     
    Jason, Feb 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. David

    starrynight Guest

    good answer

    That was a very good answer and I would probably have said some of those very same things. It depends on what your goals are, and where you already are. I always study more when I am unsure. Like Jason said, do you want to risk losing the 125 dollars (or perhaps a bit less if you have a coupon). I barely passed 272 and thought the questions were very difficult compared to what I studied for in several different books. The more material I used was the better in my situation. It's really a question of how much time you take to learn and let it all sink in. Good luck to all.
    -starrynight


    "Jason" <> wrote in message news:...
    > David,
    >
    > Your question is really the tip of a much larger issue that speaks to the
    > purpose behind certification. However, the short answer to your question is
    > this: Your exam "readiness" should be exactly that...a measure of how ready
    > you are to pass the exam. Does a 60% achieve that passing score? No. Is
    > there a chance you will pass the exam anyway? Sure there is...it all is a
    > matter of your own comfort level and your willingness to gamble. Is it
    > worth the $125 gamble to pass?
    >
    > I personally am very confidant of my technical abilities but am also very
    > uneasy when it comes to gambling on certification readiness. I would rather
    > overstudy than understudy. While losing $100 at the local Texas Hold 'Em
    > tourney is not something I do willingly, I do that more willingly than spend
    > $125 on a cert I am not sure I am ready for. Why bet on your knowledge when
    > you can know it all?
    >
    > The larger issue here though is to identify the purpose behind your
    > certification. For many at the entry level, certs are seen as the key to
    > entry. Others see it as a justification for other ends. First you must
    > ask yourself why you are taking the exam. Is this to establish your
    > credentials, or to support them? In other words, do you want to GET a job,
    > or do you want to KEEP a job? Or, quite possibly, is this simply for
    > bragging rights amongst peers? In the first case, a mere Microsoft
    > credential is not a specific means to an end. No single cert can GET you a
    > job as employers like to see a certain measure of experience. In the second
    > case, the MCDST can be invaluable in proving your worth and value to an
    > existing employer. "As the lone MCDST in your organization, I can fulfill
    > all the helpdesk needs for up to x number of users [whatever 'x' happens to
    > be]". Just be prepared to back up your cert credential with honest to
    > goodness knowledge and experience in this second case. In the third case,
    > for bragging rights, do you want to simply pass it, or do you want to be the
    > highest scorer in your peer group? For the egoist, the score is more
    > important than the pass, and scoring 60% will not give anyone bragging
    > rights.
    >
    > All said, it does seem as though in the first and last of these cases, you
    > would be better served to study more. In the second, my only consideration
    > would be whether it is company-funded or not (the exam). If it is,
    > sure....take a shot. If not...study more.
    >
    > If you are funding the exam yourself, the ultimate 'gambling' question to
    > ask is "Am I willing to risk $125 on my knowledge of this material?" If you
    > are, then take the exam. If you are not, study more. Hope this helps
    >
    > Jason
    > (Psst.....study more.)
    >
    > "David" <> wrote in message
    > news:02f001c50a55$b2403f20$...
    >> Hi, I just took the Certification Readiness tool on the
    >> Microsoft website for the MCDST exam. I scored a 67 which
    >> was below what the graft showed as 80 as a passing score.
    >> I got an email than confirming the 67 score. The email
    >> stated if I scored above 40 I was ready to take the test.
    >> I'm a little confused. I've been taking the Measure Up
    >> test and scoring around 70 usually and studying the
    >> Microsoft training materials. What's your opinion? Am I
    >> ready or should I try to get above that "80" mark?
    >> Thanks. (this was for 271)

    >
    >
     
    starrynight, Feb 6, 2005
    #3
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