Micro$oft is in trouble

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 4, 2006.

  1. http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme/archives/2006/04/the_beginning_o.html

    "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
    competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
    beginning of the end."

    Tee hee hee. :eek:)


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    Joe Barr: "So the question is not 'Is Microsoft lying?' It's deeper than that.
    The real question is, 'Is Microsoft capable of honesty?' And if you decide -
    as I have - that they are not, the next question becomes, 'Do I really want
    to do business with, to trust my business to, a company like that?'"
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme/archives/2006/04/the_beginning_o.html
    >
    > "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
    > competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
    > beginning of the end."
    >
    > Tee hee hee. :eek:)
    >


    While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
    a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    level of funtionality?

    Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
    attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
    effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.

    How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
    cope? Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
    for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
    waiting for deployment projects to be completed?

    Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
    change, just for the sake of it?


    --

    Mauricio Freitas
    www.geekzone.co.nz, www.geekzone.co.nz/freitasm,
    www.geekzone.co.nz/geekzoneblog.asp
    Software for Pocket PC: www.geekzone.co.nz/store
    Microsoft MVP Mobile Devices
     
    Mauricio Freitas [MVP], Apr 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    thingy Guest

    Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
    > "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >
    >>http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme/archives/2006/04/the_beginning_o.html
    >>
    >>"Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
    >>competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
    >>beginning of the end."
    >>
    >>Tee hee hee. :eek:)
    >>

    >
    >
    > While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    > a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
    > a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    > level of funtionality?
    >
    > Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
    > attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
    > effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
    >
    > How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
    > cope?


    Businesses should have contingency plans in place that allows them to
    replace critical infrastructure. Any competant business should be in a
    position to know what is critical, how to replace it and how long such a
    process would take.

    Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
    > for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
    > waiting for deployment projects to be completed?
    >
    > Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
    > change, just for the sake of it?
    >
    >


    In terms of quality assurance/improvement of a business; quantify what
    you have, look for improvements, impliment them where they add up
    quantify the improvement. If there is more keep it, if there is less
    move back.

    Change is the search and hopefully finding of a way of doing things
    better and/or cheaper.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Apr 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    thingy Guest

    Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
    > "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >
    >>http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme/archives/2006/04/the_beginning_o.html
    >>
    >>"Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
    >>competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
    >>beginning of the end."
    >>
    >>Tee hee hee. :eek:)
    >>

    >
    >
    > While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    > a large corporation crumbling at this point?


    Did Wang customers benefit when Wang shut its doors? Did Digital or Dec
    customers? Did countries collapse? no. These companies lost the plot,
    they wont collapse overnight. They will collapse as companies and people
    leave them and at some point they will implode because their cost
    structure is based on monopoly profit margins and not realistic ones
    most companies survive under.

    Are we (users, enterprises) in
    > a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    > level of funtionality?
    >
    > Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
    > attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
    > effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
    >
    > How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
    > cope? Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
    > for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
    > waiting for deployment projects to be completed?
    >
    > Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
    > change, just for the sake of it?


    Change is usually for the better. MS changes, it brings out new OSes
    every few years which we rush/are forced to upgrade to.....at our
    expense and risk.

    Unixes were overpriced and staid, MS started to eat their lunch, Linux
    came along and joined in.

    In turn something will replace Linux.....or Linux will morf into
    something just about un-recognisable. This will happen because there
    will be a need to be filled and the existing wont fill it. I suspect
    Linux will morf and because of its cost structure and developer base it
    will do so as needed at the pace needed. MS on the other hand is a
    company and companies suffers from shareholders, their income stream
    screams to be protected and ultimately I dont think that is possible.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Apr 4, 2006
    #4
  5. "thingy" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
    >> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit
    >> such a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users,
    >> enterprises) in a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly
    >> enable the same level of funtionality?
    >>
    >> Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to
    >> the attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and
    >> other side effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
    >>
    >> How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
    >> cope?

    >
    > Businesses should have contingency plans in place that allows them to
    > replace critical infrastructure. Any competant business should be in a
    > position to know what is critical, how to replace it and how long such a
    > process would take.
    >
    > Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
    >> for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
    >> waiting for deployment projects to be completed?
    >>
    >> Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
    >> change, just for the sake of it?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > In terms of quality assurance/improvement of a business; quantify what you
    > have, look for improvements, impliment them where they add up quantify the
    > improvement. If there is more keep it, if there is less move back.
    >
    > Change is the search and hopefully finding of a way of doing things better
    > and/or cheaper.
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Thing
    >


    Thing, this is a very good answer to my post! I'd just hope some businesses
    had the contingency in place...

    --

    Mauricio Freitas
    www.geekzone.co.nz, www.geekzone.co.nz/freitasm,
    www.geekzone.co.nz/geekzoneblog.asp
    Software for Pocket PC: www.geekzone.co.nz/store
    Microsoft MVP Mobile Devices
     
    Mauricio Freitas [MVP], Apr 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Roger_Nickel Guest

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    > http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme/archives/2006/04/the_beginning_o.html
    >
    >
    > "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left
    > without real competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the
    > organization. And that is the beginning of the end."
    >
    > Tee hee hee. :eek:)
    >
    >
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >

    Doesn't mention the role of Paul Allen in the history of MS.
    http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20060330.html .
    Difficult to grow by chewing up other people's ideas when you are
    the monopoly. The history of MS resembles the early history of
    General Motors, they will have to break up into small parts losely
    joined or die. Perhaps Bill and Steve should read Richard Tainter
    on "The Collapse of Complex Societies" and then sit back and
    contemplate MS Vista; an outstanding example of diminishing
    returns from increased complexity.
     
    Roger_Nickel, Apr 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
    > "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme/archives/2006/04/the_beginning_o.html
    >>
    >> "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
    >> competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
    >> beginning of the end."
    >>
    >> Tee hee hee. :eek:)
    >>

    >
    > While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    > a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
    > a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    > level of funtionality?
    >
    > Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
    > attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
    > effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
    >
    > How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
    > cope? Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
    > for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
    > waiting for deployment projects to be completed?


    Microsoft disappearing will not make my (rarely used) Windows 98 machine stop
    working. XP and Vista users may have other problems. More fool they. Why on
    earth people pay the devil to take their souls I do not know.

    Very few computers running Microsoft product actually make or produce anything.
    They are almost universally overheads and not assets, sitting there doing
    nothing with almost all their processor cycles interupted only rarely to
    process a keystroke adding a character to a text document or move a virtual
    solitaire card. Meanwhile they burn ever increasing amounts of energy.

    How many computers have you seen that actually make things ?

    How many have you seen that just sit on someone's desk doing stuff that could
    be more profitably be done with a pen and a piece of paper ?

    As for waiting for other technologies to catch up, au contraire, in the real
    world we've been waiting for Microsoft to catch up ever since they released
    their first DOS. Multiprocessing, multiple accounts, file protections,
    privilege separation, user and process accounting and all the other
    technologies that were in existence way back when Gates and Allen were hacking
    the guts out of CP/M and the DEC OSes but which they chose to leave out.
    They've been struggling to get them in ever since and the result is plain to
    see in the wide range of antivirus companies which specialise solely in threats
    to Microsoft's products.

    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1945808,00.asp

    > Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
    > change, just for the sake of it?


    Perhaps they wish to improve things rather than simply change.

    If I buy a computer and an operating system to run on it I expect the
    combination to be under MY control, not the vendors. They have my money, they
    are my servants and not the other way around.

    http://xbox-linux.sourceforge.net/docs/remotedelete.html

    Throwing off tyranny and oppression seems like a reasonably good reason for
    change to me. Microsoft are an integral part of a wider problem in that regard.
     
    Mark Robinson, Apr 4, 2006
    #7
  8. On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:37:29 +1200, Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:

    > While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    > a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
    > a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    > level of funtionality?


    There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    software with other software.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 4, 2006
    #8
  9. On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 09:09:23 +1200, Mark Robinson wrote:

    > If I buy a computer and an operating system to run on it I expect the
    > combination to be under MY control, not the vendors. They have my money, they
    > are my servants and not the other way around.


    Micro$oft wants you thinking otherwise.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 4, 2006
    #9
  10. On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 09:43:22 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    wrote:

    >
    >There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    >software with other software.



    And that is another reason why Microsoft have their nasty TCPA ,
    formerly known as Palladium,

    Once they get control of the hardware then Microsoft can decide l
    what programs they will let you run.


    Patrick
     
    Patrick FitzGerald, Apr 4, 2006
    #10
  11. In article <2tod.net>, Mark Robinson <2tod.net> wrote:

    >Very few computers running Microsoft product actually make or produce anything.
    >
    >They are almost universally overheads and not assets, sitting there doing
    >nothing with almost all their processor cycles interupted only rarely to
    >process a keystroke adding a character to a text document or move a virtual
    >solitaire card. Meanwhile they burn ever increasing amounts of energy.
    >
    >How many computers have you seen that actually make things ?


    Pretty much any piece of scientific equipment you can buy now comes with a
    computer as a controller. Do they "make" anything ? ... well no not
    specifically ... but they do make the equipment useable ... I would hate to
    have to run some of that gear from a front panel :)


    Bruce

    ----------------------------------------
    I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are the good
    people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and
    only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides.

    Lord Vetinari in Guards ! Guards ! - Terry Pratchett

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Apr 5, 2006
    #11
  12. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Mark,

    > Why on earth people pay the devil to take their souls I do
    > not know.


    ok... so Microsoft is now Lucifer, or would you rather prefer Satan or 'the
    Devil', im sure i can renember some other names attributed to 'the Devil'
    but not right now.


    > Very few computers running Microsoft product actually make or produce
    > anything.


    hmmm really ?

    so the three computers i use on a daily basis dont actually do much, i better
    tell my bos that - you know so he can reduce the number of MSDN subscriptions
    he pays for, i mean if we only actulally *use* one box for development stuff
    (ohh i work at a software shop, we write software) we only actually *need*
    a single MSDN subscription. is that what your trying to say ?

    > They are almost universally overheads and not assets,


    how so - im genunelly intrested, would they be assets if they were running
    linux ?

    > sitting there doing nothing with almost all their processor cycles
    > interupted only rarely to process a keystroke adding a character to a
    > text document or move a virtual solitaire card.


    lol - shit man, its been like that for decades - cpu's power along and tend
    to do nothing with the processing time.

    now, what i see happenning is more recognition going on, like voice recognition
    that actually works, facal recognition (pop up a help file when the user
    looks confused), context sensitave help (looking at where the eyeball is
    and providing better help).

    that would vacume cpu ticks like they are going out of fashon, at least they
    wont get 'wasted'.

    > Meanwhile they burn
    > ever increasing amounts of energy.


    talk to the hardware guys.

    personally i find it kinda sick that the tards that design these things dont
    have any problems with it needing a nuclear power plant to run. idealy chips
    should be smart enough to 'clock down' when not in use and smart enough to
    not 'clock down' while you in the middle of a damn game (do Intell chips
    still do that?).

    > How many computers have you seen that actually make things ?


    computers dont make things, people make things.

    a computer is NOTHING but a expensive paperweight without logic - and who
    provides the logic - we humans do.

    computers dont create stuff, people do.

    > How many have you seen that just sit on someone's desk doing stuff
    > that could be more profitably be done with a pen and a piece of paper
    > ?


    ok, in all seriousness im starting to look for little smilies, some indication
    that you are actually joking.

    i dont know about you but i actually type faster than i can write, so for
    me the more 'profitable' thing is to use this computer.

    give me some examples of using a pen and paper that *scales*

    > As for waiting for other technologies to catch up, au contraire, in
    > the real world we've been waiting for Microsoft to catch up ever since
    > they released their first DOS. Multiprocessing, multiple accounts,
    > file protections, privilege separation, user and process accounting
    > and all the other technologies that were in existence way back when
    > Gates and Allen were hacking the guts out of CP/M and the DEC OSes but
    > which they chose to leave out.


    and here we have the time and place where the *personal computer* was concieved.

    a personal computer *had* little need for multiple acounts, file protections,
    privilage seperation, user and process accounting. these were the days when
    Gates and Allen were young and carefree, people who used computers used them
    for the pourposes of good and not evil, when gay ment happy not bent.

    look at it form their perspective (i know its hard, you fear the dark side
    i can tell) all they wanted to do was get a machine that could be used for
    everyday stuff by everyday people. at that time computers were a thing that
    people with pointy hair used, they filed reams of punch-cards into them so
    they could add up 1*1 ^2 (simplistic i know).

    but that was the enviroment where the PC was concieved, and form where i
    stand they done a good job - gates should have pulled finger in relation
    to security earlier (98 era) but you cant undoo what was done and what do
    they say about 20/20 vision.

    > They've been struggling to get them in ever since


    so XP doesnt have multiple accounts ?

    iirc even NT had all thoes things you listed, renember it was the 9x series
    that was made from a pile of dog manure. but to give the 9x developers some
    credit, they did pioneer a more frendly user interface.

    > the result is plain to see in the wide range of
    > antivirus companies which specialise solely in threats to Microsoft's
    > products.


    so its got nothing to do with the fact that Windows is the most Hacked operating
    system out there. people spend their lives trying to find their ways through
    security - or bypassing it altogether.

    personally i beleve such people give Microsoft an advantage, all thoes people
    at Microsoft that write Windows have the opportunity to talk to these 'hackers'
    through confrences like Blue Hat, they learn first hand how these incredably
    intellegent people manage to bypass the security on windows.

    personally i believe that confrences like 'Blue Hat' should have been happenning
    years ago, Microsoft should have opened up a dialouge with the 'security
    community' years ago.

    enough of this crazy shit, back to work.

    ----------------
    Steven H

    the madGeek
     
    Steven H, Apr 5, 2006
    #12
  13. On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 10:54:35 +1200, Patrick FitzGerald wrote:

    >>There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    >>software with other software.

    >
    > And that is another reason why Microsoft have their nasty TCPA ,
    > formerly known as Palladium,


    If you are using an OS that doesn't use that little bit of hardware, then
    surely you won't have a problem.


    > Once they get control of the hardware then Microsoft can decide l
    > what programs they will let you run.


    Micro$oft would only be able to do that if your computer is running a
    Micro$oft OS such as... Vi$ta.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "When a company starts fighting over IP, it's a
    sign they've lost the real battle, for users."
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 5, 2006
    #13
  14. On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 12:18:23 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    wrote:


    >Micro$oft would only be able to do that if your computer is running a
    >Micro$oft OS such as... Vi$ta.
    >



    Not so, they plan to put all the controls into hardware which will
    allow them to decide what you are allowed to read from or write to
    memeory, disks, monitors , printers etc.



    Patrick
     
    Patrick FitzGerald, Apr 5, 2006
    #14
  15. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Roger_Nickel Guest

    Patrick FitzGerald wrote:
    > On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 12:18:23 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Micro$oft would only be able to do that if your computer is running a
    >>Micro$oft OS such as... Vi$ta.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > Not so, they plan to put all the controls into hardware which will
    > allow them to decide what you are allowed to read from or write to
    > memeory, disks, monitors , printers etc.
    >
    >
    >
    > Patrick

    Article here on the new Intel replacement for the traditional BIOS
    http://news.com.com/2100-1008_3-5131787.html
     
    Roger_Nickel, Apr 5, 2006
    #15
  16. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 09:43:22 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:37:29 +1200, Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    >> a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
    >> a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    >> level of funtionality?

    >
    >There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    >software with other software.


    What is it?
     
    Craig Shore, Apr 5, 2006
    #16
  17. On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 21:04:22 +1200, Craig Shore wrote:

    >>> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would
    >>> benefit such a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we
    >>> (users, enterprises) in a position to find a valid replacement that
    >>> would rapidly enable the same level of funtionality?

    >>
    >>There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    >>software with other software.

    >
    > What is it?


    What is what? The Means?


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 5, 2006
    #17
  18. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 21:53:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    exclaimed:

    >On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 21:04:22 +1200, Craig Shore wrote:
    >
    >>>> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would
    >>>> benefit such a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we
    >>>> (users, enterprises) in a position to find a valid replacement that
    >>>> would rapidly enable the same level of funtionality?
    >>>
    >>>There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    >>>software with other software.

    >>
    >> What is it?

    >
    >What is what? The Means?
    >

    I'd quite like to know, too. I've seen software that kindof imitates
    some of it, but nothing with even remotely the same functionality.
     
    Fred Dagg, Apr 5, 2006
    #18
  19. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Philip Guest

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:37:29 +1200, Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
    >> a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
    >> a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
    >> level of funtionality?

    >
    > There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    > software with other software.
    >


    Not really, because the applications for general use, to run
    under other affordable OS, aren't really there.

    In my case radio station scheduling and playout software designed to
    operate under a Microsoft OS. The Linux alternatives are trivial,
    feature-free and unreliable. If you are making part of your living
    running software on a computer that is 20 km away, you want to know it
    will recover safely from pretty well anything that can happen to it, and
    you won't spend the next day writing refund cheques to aggrieved
    advertisers and sponsors. So far I haven't found a Linux equivalent to
    Station Playlist that has the same stability, performance and features.

    Yes it runs under WINE, but more slowly and with unexpected shutdowns.

    I'm sure others will have other, similarly specialised, programs they
    need to run for their businesses, some of them possibly more crucial
    than playing out Dragnet and Dad & Dave & the Goon Show and the popular
    music repertoire of the last century.

    I already use Linux in my home and the admin side of my business. That
    choice is because I am a geek* that started out in computing when a
    Kansas City Bus didn't take you downtown but did connect to a cassette
    player, when Prestel and BTX and Minitel were the closest you got to
    online, and when FidoNet was the only window on the world you were going
    to get, and I had window number 2:253/197, and CP/M was the main OS
    around that supported the new five inch floppy drives that could store a
    massive 128K of files, and networking was what you did with Novell 2(3,
    3.1, 3.2 and bingo!) and Micro-Soft was this two-bit start-up company
    out of the US that was trying to make something good out of QDos to help
    us all survive in a world of unbelievably huge five megabyte Winchester
    drives.

    Linux is weak in support because many users find that a lot of the
    documentation is written by people that already know the answers and are
    sneering at the questioners for being n00bies and lusers and beginnerz.
    How to win friends and influence people. Yeah right.

    Think mechanics in the garage when you go in and complain about the
    noise that only happens when you engage second gear the third time after
    you used the remote control to open the roof. And if you're female think
    mechanics in the garage the minute you drive onto the forecourt. In
    terms of real world user-level support, most Linux product sucks.

    Microsoft and its people aren't wonderful, I think they quite often
    abuse their dominant position, they throw chairs around and they are
    frequently a pain in the arse. But they are there, and if they weren't
    there would be far fewer computers sold, and they would all be closed
    proprietary systems that couldn't even read floppy disks from other
    brands of computer. Remember Atari TOS? Sinclair Spectrum? NewBrain?.
    TI? Commodore? Amiga? Apple? Amstrad? All mutually incompatible variants
    that spent more time not talking to their competitors than supporting
    their user base of several.

    Microsoft might want to be the Evil Empire, but it ain't and we don't
    need to act like it is. Yet.

    If the fight is against the expansion of DRM, don't bother blaming
    Microsoft and Intel - hit out at the content industry. Start reading and
    writing at www.lessig.org & groklaw.net

    And BTW what is with this $ in Micro$oft? Are you cro$$ with them for
    being a profit-making company? What would you rather they did? Lose
    money for their users and investors?

    Should we then talk about Appl€ and its iTun€$?. $un and its $tar Offic€?

    R€d Hat? D€bian? $u$€?

    If you think Microsoft is doing you down, then yell as loud as you can
    in front of people that can change that. Pi$$ing around with their name
    demeans you, not them.

    Ghoondelop

    (a.k.a. *Philip*)
     
    Philip, Apr 5, 2006
    #19
  20. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 21:53:56 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 21:04:22 +1200, Craig Shore wrote:
    >
    >>>> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would
    >>>> benefit such a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we
    >>>> (users, enterprises) in a position to find a valid replacement that
    >>>> would rapidly enable the same level of funtionality?
    >>>
    >>>There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
    >>>software with other software.

    >>
    >> What is it?

    >
    >What is what? The Means?


    Yeah. What exists to completely replace MS software?
     
    Craig Shore, Apr 5, 2006
    #20
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