Micro$oft crapola advertising

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by peterwn, Aug 28, 2007.

  1. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    Microsoft has run an ad in today's DomPost (and presumably other papers)
    trying to convince everyone that the only means of protecting document
    heritage is to go along with OOXML, since Micro$oft says that this is
    the only progression from the traditional Micro$oft Office formats.

    What Micro$oft has not mentioned is the very old Micro$oft document
    formats which contemporary versions of Word cannot handle - if existing
    Word software cannot handle them, then what about the future?

    Other software can mostly handle these and very old formats, granted not
    100%. Open Office can pretty well open any current or legacy format
    apart from OOXML, AFAIK Government Achieves uses Open Office to sus out
    legacy formats to help preservation. They save achieved digital
    documents in a 'cluster' - meta-data about the document, the original
    digital format and AFAIK a .odf 'translation' so the document is easily
    opened and read.

    It is quite apparent that that archieve needs are best met by adopting a
    simple and functional digital format for future documents which is what
    ISO standard .odf is all about - there is no need for saved documents to
    start playing tunes, running hidden software, etc.

    OOXML falls far, far short of acceptability as an international
    standard, which is why Micro$oft is having to resort to character
    assassinations, bribery, corruption, rigged ISO contributory group
    meetings and ballot box stuffing to try and ram its non-standard through
    ISO. Many of these techniques do not work in NZ, so they are having to
    resort to crapola advertising that does not tell the full story.

    If OOXML does gain some traction and others start writing software to
    work with it, users are likely to be hit up by Micro$oft for 'protection
    money' as is happening with Linux. While Micro$oft has signalled some
    patent dispensation with OOXML to try and get it through the ISO door,
    it is totally inadequate for real peace of mind, especially for
    organisations who just cannot afford a ding-dong legal fight against
    Micro$oft.

    Assuming it becomes a standard and NZ Government gives its blessing for
    general use, it should legislate to 'disable' associated patents and
    criminalise protection racketeering with respect to IP. Fair's fair,
    big business, including orgnisations associated with Micro$oft are
    calling on more and more ciminalisation of IP breaches together with
    tougher penalties.
     
    peterwn, Aug 28, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 14:01:19 +1200, peterwn wrote:

    > OOXML falls far, far short of acceptability as an international standard,
    > which is why Micro$oft is having to resort to character assassinations,
    > bribery, corruption, rigged ISO contributory group meetings and ballot box
    > stuffing to try and ram its non-standard through ISO. Many of these
    > techniques do not work in NZ, so they are having to resort to crapola
    > advertising that does not tell the full story.


    Sounds like BAU for Micro$oft - and another reason why people should be
    extremely cautious when dealing with any information provided by Micro$oft
    or a Micro$oft partner.


    --
    Jonathan Walker

    "The IT industry landscape is littered with the dead
    dreams of people who once trusted Microsoft."
     
    Jonathan Walker, Aug 28, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. peterwn

    Peter Guest

    peterwn wrote:
    > Microsoft has run an ad in today's DomPost (and presumably other papers)
    > trying to convince everyone that the only means of protecting document
    > heritage is to go along with OOXML, since Micro$oft says that this is
    > the only progression from the traditional Micro$oft Office formats.


    Coincidentally matches comment by Bruce Simpson this morning ...
    "But the day we lose the right to choose which OS we load onto our PCs is
    the day we might as well give up voting and open our wallets to Bill's
    boys. And the unfortunate thing is that, whether by order of law or by
    pressure from content providers, we're all being inexorably steered towards
    a future where Microsoft "owns" us."
    http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2007/0828.shtml

    The key thing here is freedom and user choice. We are only as free as the
    (software) technology we depend on.

    http://softwarefreedomday.org/


    Peter
     
    Peter, Aug 28, 2007
    #3
  4. peterwn

    whoisthis Guest

    In article <>,
    Jonathan Walker <> wrote:

    > On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 14:01:19 +1200, peterwn wrote:
    >
    > > OOXML falls far, far short of acceptability as an international standard,
    > > which is why Micro$oft is having to resort to character assassinations,
    > > bribery, corruption, rigged ISO contributory group meetings and ballot box
    > > stuffing to try and ram its non-standard through ISO. Many of these
    > > techniques do not work in NZ, so they are having to resort to crapola
    > > advertising that does not tell the full story.

    >
    > Sounds like BAU for Micro$oft - and another reason why people should be
    > extremely cautious when dealing with any information provided by Micro$oft
    > or a Micro$oft partner.


    They should also be careful of all the grossly inaccurate information
    put about by the linux zealots.
     
    whoisthis, Aug 28, 2007
    #4
  5. peterwn

    peterwn Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Jonathan Walker <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 14:01:19 +1200, peterwn wrote:
    >>
    >>> OOXML falls far, far short of acceptability as an international standard,
    >>> which is why Micro$oft is having to resort to character assassinations,
    >>> bribery, corruption, rigged ISO contributory group meetings and ballot box
    >>> stuffing to try and ram its non-standard through ISO. Many of these
    >>> techniques do not work in NZ, so they are having to resort to crapola
    >>> advertising that does not tell the full story.

    >> Sounds like BAU for Micro$oft - and another reason why people should be
    >> extremely cautious when dealing with any information provided by Micro$oft
    >> or a Micro$oft partner.

    >
    > They should also be careful of all the grossly inaccurate information
    > put about by the linux zealots.


    Example, please that pertains specifically to this topic.
     
    peterwn, Aug 28, 2007
    #5
  6. peterwn

    Shane Guest

    peterwn wrote:

    > Microsoft has run an ad in today's DomPost (and presumably other papers)
    > trying to convince everyone that the only means of protecting document
    > heritage is to go along with OOXML, since Micro$oft says that this is
    > the only progression from the traditional Micro$oft Office formats.
    >
    > What Micro$oft has not mentioned is the very old Micro$oft document
    > formats which contemporary versions of Word cannot handle - if existing
    > Word software cannot handle them, then what about the future?
    >
    > Other software can mostly handle these and very old formats, granted not
    > 100%. Open Office can pretty well open any current or legacy format
    > apart from OOXML, AFAIK Government Achieves uses Open Office to sus out
    > legacy formats to help preservation. They save achieved digital
    > documents in a 'cluster' - meta-data about the document, the original
    > digital format and AFAIK a .odf 'translation' so the document is easily
    > opened and read.
    >
    > It is quite apparent that that archieve needs are best met by adopting a
    > simple and functional digital format for future documents which is what
    > ISO standard .odf is all about - there is no need for saved documents to
    > start playing tunes, running hidden software, etc.
    >
    > OOXML falls far, far short of acceptability as an international
    > standard, which is why Micro$oft is having to resort to character
    > assassinations, bribery, corruption, rigged ISO contributory group
    > meetings and ballot box stuffing to try and ram its non-standard through
    > ISO. Many of these techniques do not work in NZ, so they are having to
    > resort to crapola advertising that does not tell the full story.
    >
    > If OOXML does gain some traction and others start writing software to
    > work with it, users are likely to be hit up by Micro$oft for 'protection
    > money' as is happening with Linux. While Micro$oft has signalled some
    > patent dispensation with OOXML to try and get it through the ISO door,
    > it is totally inadequate for real peace of mind, especially for
    > organisations who just cannot afford a ding-dong legal fight against
    > Micro$oft.
    >
    > Assuming it becomes a standard and NZ Government gives its blessing for
    > general use, it should legislate to 'disable' associated patents and
    > criminalise protection racketeering with respect to IP. Fair's fair,
    > big business, including orgnisations associated with Micro$oft are
    > calling on more and more ciminalisation of IP breaches together with
    > tougher penalties.



    Heres the ad.

    From the Dominion Post, Tues 28 August 2007 (page C3):

    To all New Zealanders

    Protecting our heritage, our future….

    Prior to the arrival of computing, our personal, business and public
    documents were created in a single, open format –
    the written or typed word on paper – and stored for ongoing access,
    preservation and future reference. The arrival of
    the computer changed everything.

    In a few days, Standards New Zealand will make a decision that will have a
    direct impact on the way New Zealanders store, access
    and share their electronic documents now and in the future. The final
    decision will determine whether to support Open XML as
    an ISO standard alongside other document formats. Open XML is a new format
    that allows Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint
    documents to be easily converted to an open standard, while also supporting
    the full capabilities of those applications.

    This is about much more than technology – it is about New Zealand.

    For the past twenty years, most of our business and organisational
    information has been written and stored in digital format
    – much of it in Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint documents. So much so,
    these are now considered informal standards.
    New Zealanders use these documents every day – at work, at school and at
    play. These documents support the learning of our
    children and communities. They support the world-class innovation that is
    emerging from our flourishing IT sector.

    Along with many others in New Zealand, we believe having Open XML approved
    as an ISO standard will help:

    * Protect our heritage and enable ongoing access to documents that are
    already in existence now and in the future.
    * Provide choice about which software we use to exchange documents.
    * Secure our future when storing and formatting information without
    requiring the use of any specific organisation, machine
    or system.
    * Foster innovation and enable the New Zealand IT industry to develop new
    and innovative software for markets locally
    and worldwide.
    * Give confidence that Open XML can continue to evolve under the supervision
    of the International Standards Organisation (ISO).

    Given the sheer volume of our digital record and its importance to our
    businesses, communities and families, it is vital that we
    retain the same level of openness and transparency as in the ‘paper days’.

    Supporting Open XML as an ISO standard is a good thing for New Zealand. It
    means the ownership of this standard will be in the
    hands of an independent, well recognised international organisation. You can
    visit www.openxmlcommunity.org to learn more
    about the benefits or call 0800 800 004 for more details.

    We urge Standards New Zealand to support the ISO ratification of Open XML;
    and by doing so provide New Zealand businesses,
    entrepreneurs, communities and families with greater certainty and choice,
    and a means to safeguard our digital heritage.

    Helen Robinson
    Managing Director Microsoft New Zealand

    Brett Roberts
    Director of Innovation Microsoft New Zealand

    --
    Q: Who knows everything there is to be known about vector analysis?
    A: The Oracle of del phi!
     
    Shane, Aug 28, 2007
    #6
  7. In message <fb0q21$dc6$>, Shane wrote:

    > To all New Zealanders
    >
    > Protecting our heritage, our future….


    ....

    > This is about much more than technology – it is about New Zealand.


    ....

    > * Protect our heritage and enable ongoing access to documents that are
    > already in existence now and in the future.


    *puke*
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 28, 2007
    #7
  8. peterwn

    Gordon Guest

    On 2007-08-28, peterwn <> wrote:
    > Microsoft has run an ad in today's DomPost (and presumably other papers)
    > trying to convince everyone that the only means of protecting document
    > heritage is to go along with OOXML, since Micro$oft says that this is
    > the only progression from the traditional Micro$oft Office formats.
    >

    Saw the ad. Very interesting and it confirms what has been posted in this
    ng, MS is trying to have it its own way for its profit.

    I did enjoy in bewilderment Brett Roberts title.
     
    Gordon, Aug 29, 2007
    #8
    1. Advertising

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