Micorosoft Office on Desktop and Laptop

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by McWideGlide, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. McWideGlide

    McWideGlide Guest

    Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop and
    laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.
    McWideGlide, Apr 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. McWideGlide

    Jimchip Guest

    On 2006-04-18, McWideGlide <> wrote:
    > Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop and
    > laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    > maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.


    It's possible but illegal.

    --
    Your morals may vary but don't get caught...The law doesn't vary.
    Jimchip, Apr 18, 2006
    #2
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  3. McWideGlide

    dizum Guest

    > It's possible but illegal.
    NOPE.

    If you own software, you can load it into your desktop and laptop. You
    should use only one computer at a time. (While you use laptop, do not use
    desktop and vice-versa.)
    This will make you 100% legal.
    There should be no problem with registration.
    I have it that way. I had some problem with registration, because M$
    employee in Bangalore was unable to comprehend my situation. I am usin
    desktop while at home-office and laptop while on business trips, so I cannot
    use desktop while I am on my business trip. I asked M$ Bangalore employee
    for a supevisor and in 2 minutes I receive registration key.
    Yes, I threathened to return software back to retailer.


    --
    Pursuant to Public Law No 109-162 I hereby certify, assert, testify,
    warrant, and affirm that it is not (nor has it ever been) my intent,
    aim, objective or purpose in any way to irritate, frustrate, bother,
    provoke, gall, aggravate, bother, bug, chafe, fret, irk, nettle, peeve,
    put out, rile, bait, beleaguer, beset, plague, tease, torment, worry,
    disturb, vex, exasperate, ruffle, harrass, harry, pester, bedevil, piss
    off, piss on, or in any other way annoy the reader of this post.


    "Jimchip" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2006-04-18, McWideGlide <> wrote:
    > > Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop

    and
    > > laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no,

    but
    > > maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.

    >
    > It's possible but illegal.
    >
    > --
    > Your morals may vary but don't get caught...The law doesn't vary.
    dizum, Apr 18, 2006
    #3
  4. McWideGlide

    Gordon Guest

    McWideGlide wrote:

    > Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop
    > and
    > laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    > maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.


    Yes, but it does depend on the version you have. Read the Eula- it will tell
    you whether you can do so with your particular version.

    --
    Gordon Burgess-Parker
    Interim Systems and Management Accounting
    www.gbpcomputing.co.uk
    Gordon, Apr 18, 2006
    #4
  5. McWideGlide

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 03:57:00 +0000, McWideGlide wrote:

    > Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop and
    > laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    > maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.


    Legally, no.
    --

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    Meat Plow, Apr 18, 2006
    #5
  6. McWideGlide

    Gordon Guest

    Meat Plow wrote:

    > On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 03:57:00 +0000, McWideGlide wrote:
    >
    >> Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop
    >> and
    >> laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no,
    >> but
    >> maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.

    >
    > Legally, no.
    > --


    Rubbish. Certain versions of office SPECIFICALLY say in the Eula that they
    CAN be installed on one desktop and one laptop - as long as only one of
    them is in use at any one time.

    --
    Gordon Burgess-Parker
    Interim Systems and Management Accounting
    www.gbpcomputing.co.uk
    Gordon, Apr 18, 2006
    #6
  7. McWideGlide

    Jimchip Guest

    On 2006-04-18, dizum <> wrote:
    >> It's possible but illegal.

    > NOPE.


    Your example *may* be something like what the OP was talking about but I
    don't think so.

    Maybe the OP will clarify. Like another responder said, "Read the EULA".

    I admit I was thinking about an OEM key and transfer to another computer.

    >
    > If you own software, you can load it into your desktop and laptop. You
    > should use only one computer at a time. (While you use laptop, do not use
    > desktop and vice-versa.)
    > This will make you 100% legal.
    > There should be no problem with registration.
    > I have it that way. I had some problem with registration, because M$
    > employee in Bangalore was unable to comprehend my situation. I am usin
    > desktop while at home-office and laptop while on business trips, so I cannot
    > use desktop while I am on my business trip. I asked M$ Bangalore employee
    > for a supevisor and in 2 minutes I receive registration key.
    > Yes, I threathened to return software back to retailer.


    --
    If it's not illegal then they won't 'get caught' and there's nothing to
    worry about.
    Jimchip, Apr 18, 2006
    #7
  8. McWideGlide

    Leythos Guest

    In article <-meatplow.local>,
    l says...
    > On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 03:57:00 +0000, McWideGlide wrote:
    >
    > > Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop and
    > > laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    > > maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.

    >
    > Legally, no.


    Actually, the FULL RETAIL version can be installed on two machines, as
    long as the user owns both, is not shared. OEM versions can not be
    installed on two machines.


    --


    remove 999 in order to email me
    Leythos, Apr 18, 2006
    #8
  9. McWideGlide

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 11:34:01 +0000, Leythos wrote:

    > In article <-meatplow.local>,
    > l says...
    >> On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 03:57:00 +0000, McWideGlide wrote:
    >>
    >> > Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop and
    >> > laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    >> > maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.

    >>
    >> Legally, no.

    >
    > Actually, the FULL RETAIL version can be installed on two machines, as
    > long as the user owns both, is not shared. OEM versions can not be
    > installed on two machines.


    Cool.
    --

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    Meat Plow, Apr 18, 2006
    #9
  10. McWideGlide

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 12:26:59 +0100, Gordon wrote:

    > Meat Plow wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 03:57:00 +0000, McWideGlide wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop
    >>> and
    >>> laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no,
    >>> but
    >>> maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.

    >>
    >> Legally, no.
    >> --

    >
    > Rubbish. Certain versions of office SPECIFICALLY say in the Eula that they
    > CAN be installed on one desktop and one laptop - as long as only one of
    > them is in use at any one time.


    So in other words, my statement is accurate.
    --

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    Meat Plow, Apr 18, 2006
    #10
  11. McWideGlide

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-18, dizum <> wrote:
    >> It's possible but illegal.

    > NOPE.
    >
    > If you own software, you can load it into your desktop and laptop. You
    > should use only one computer at a time. (While you use laptop, do not use
    > desktop and vice-versa.)
    > This will make you 100% legal.
    > There should be no problem with registration.


    If it's a Microsoft product, then Microsoft own it; what you buy is a
    'licence' (or 'license') to use it within the terms of the End User
    Licence Agreement you had to accept before being allowed to use the
    product. The EULA will tell you what you are and are not allowed to do
    with that particular piece of Microsoft's property.

    > I have it that way. I had some problem with registration, because M$
    > employee in Bangalore was unable to comprehend my situation. I am usin
    > desktop while at home-office and laptop while on business trips, so I cannot
    > use desktop while I am on my business trip. I asked M$ Bangalore employee
    > for a supevisor and in 2 minutes I receive registration key.
    > Yes, I threathened to return software back to retailer.


    Try OpenOffice.org instead of Microsoft Office; when you download that for
    free, legally, you are entitled to make and use as many copies as you want
    - also free. It runs on Windows and on Linux, so your migration to Linux
    is eased when the time comes - and it can load most documents produced by
    MS Office, too. No need ever to beg for permission to use it - it really
    /is/ yours :))

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Apr 18, 2006
    #11
  12. McWideGlide

    Zitty Guest

    "Whiskers" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2006-04-18, dizum <> wrote:
    >>> It's possible but illegal.

    >> NOPE.
    >>
    >> If you own software, you can load it into your desktop and laptop. You
    >> should use only one computer at a time. (While you use laptop, do not use
    >> desktop and vice-versa.)
    >> This will make you 100% legal.
    >> There should be no problem with registration.

    >
    > If it's a Microsoft product, then Microsoft own it; what you buy is a
    > 'licence' (or 'license') to use it within the terms of the End User
    > Licence Agreement you had to accept before being allowed to use the
    > product. The EULA will tell you what you are and are not allowed to do
    > with that particular piece of Microsoft's property.
    >
    >> I have it that way. I had some problem with registration, because M$
    >> employee in Bangalore was unable to comprehend my situation. I am usin
    >> desktop while at home-office and laptop while on business trips, so I
    >> cannot
    >> use desktop while I am on my business trip. I asked M$ Bangalore employee
    >> for a supevisor and in 2 minutes I receive registration key.
    >> Yes, I threathened to return software back to retailer.

    >
    > Try OpenOffice.org instead of Microsoft Office; when you download that for
    > free, legally, you are entitled to make and use as many copies as you want
    > - also free. It runs on Windows and on Linux, so your migration to Linux
    > is eased when the time comes - and it can load most documents produced by
    > MS Office, too. No need ever to beg for permission to use it - it really
    > /is/ yours :))


    It really /is/ rubbish too - takes *ages* to load, runs like a tortoise in
    molasses, and looks awful.

    Still, its not bad for free I suppose.
    Zitty, Apr 18, 2006
    #12
  13. McWideGlide

    Gordon Guest

    Zitty wrote:


    >
    > It really /is/ rubbish too - takes *ages* to load, runs like a tortoise
    > in molasses, and looks awful.
    >


    version 2.02 - the latest - runs about the same speed as MS Office
    2002......IF your machine is free of spyware, malware etc.

    --
    Gordon Burgess-Parker
    Interim Systems and Management Accounting
    www.gbpcomputing.co.uk
    Gordon, Apr 18, 2006
    #13
  14. McWideGlide

    Gordon Guest

    Zitty wrote:


    >
    > Maybe it runs about the same speed, but it takes minutes to actually load
    > to get to the point of actually running.


    Rubbish - about 7 seconds here from startup........what are you running it
    on, a Sinclair ZX?

    --
    Gordon Burgess-Parker
    Interim Systems and Management Accounting
    www.gbpcomputing.co.uk
    Gordon, Apr 18, 2006
    #14
  15. McWideGlide

    Zitty Guest

    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Zitty wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> It really /is/ rubbish too - takes *ages* to load, runs like a tortoise
    >> in molasses, and looks awful.
    >>

    >
    > version 2.02 - the latest - runs about the same speed as MS Office
    > 2002......IF your machine is free of spyware, malware etc.
    >



    Maybe it runs about the same speed, but it takes minutes to actually load to
    get to the point of actually running. And yes, this machine, and the Linux
    server, are free of spyware and such.
    Zitty, Apr 18, 2006
    #15
  16. McWideGlide

    AGEE Guest

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 13:48:28 +0100, Whiskers
    <> wrote:

    >On 2006-04-18, dizum <> wrote:
    >>> It's possible but illegal.

    >> NOPE.
    >>
    >> If you own software, you can load it into your desktop and laptop. You
    >> should use only one computer at a time. (While you use laptop, do not use
    >> desktop and vice-versa.)
    >> This will make you 100% legal.
    >> There should be no problem with registration.

    >
    >If it's a Microsoft product, then Microsoft own it; what you buy is a
    >'licence' (or 'license') to use it within the terms of the End User
    >Licence Agreement you had to accept before being allowed to use the
    >product. The EULA will tell you what you are and are not allowed to do
    >with that particular piece of Microsoft's property.
    >

    No. The EULA will only apply wholly under US law. Almost the entire
    rest of the world has different laws so some or all of the EULA may be
    unenforceable or even illegal depending on the locality. Even in the
    same legal jurisdiction it may depend on how and when you purchased
    the product as to how far you are bound by any EULA.
    AGEE, Apr 18, 2006
    #16
  17. McWideGlide

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-18, AGEE <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 13:48:28 +0100, Whiskers
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On 2006-04-18, dizum <> wrote:
    >>>> It's possible but illegal.
    >>> NOPE.
    >>>
    >>> If you own software, you can load it into your desktop and laptop. You
    >>> should use only one computer at a time. (While you use laptop, do not use
    >>> desktop and vice-versa.)
    >>> This will make you 100% legal.
    >>> There should be no problem with registration.

    >>
    >>If it's a Microsoft product, then Microsoft own it; what you buy is a
    >>'licence' (or 'license') to use it within the terms of the End User
    >>Licence Agreement you had to accept before being allowed to use the
    >>product. The EULA will tell you what you are and are not allowed to do
    >>with that particular piece of Microsoft's property.
    >>

    > No. The EULA will only apply wholly under US law. Almost the entire
    > rest of the world has different laws so some or all of the EULA may be
    > unenforceable or even illegal depending on the locality. Even in the
    > same legal jurisdiction it may depend on how and when you purchased
    > the product as to how far you are bound by any EULA.


    The EULA is a contract between Microsoft and their customer, so normal
    commercial contract law applies - things like the British 'sale of goods
    act' would only apply to the discs and documents and other goods supplied,
    not to the licence to use the software (or the software itself, probably) -
    that is a 'service', not goods.

    I haven't seen anything in a Microsoft EULA that conflicts with any English
    or Scottish law or precedent that I've encountered. Perhaps if a
    commercial lawyer reads this thread, they could offer an expert opinion.

    Incidentally, the wording of the EULA defines the applicable jurisdiction
    according to where you "acquired this Software", not where you use it. In
    commercial contracts it is quite normal to agree to apply the law of a
    country other than that in which one, or any, of the parties is domiciled,
    if they are not all in the same country.

    It is interesting that there is no 'Arbitration Clause' in the EULA to
    establish a means of reconciling a dispute without resort to the courts.

    <http://www.microsoft.com/office/eula/en.mspx> "End User License
    Agreements Microsoft Office System Published: October 1, 2003 | Updated:
    February 12, 2004"

    <http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/facts/salegoodsact.htm> "FACTSHEET and
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Subject: Sale of Goods Act, Faulty
    Goods."

    <http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/facts/unfairact1977.htm> "FACTSHEET and
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Subject: Exclusion Clauses in Contracts.
    Relevant or Related Legislation: Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977, Consumer
    Transactions (Restrictions on Statements) Order 1976."

    <http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/facts/untermsact1999.htm> "FACTSHEET
    and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Subject: Unfair Terms in Contracts
    With Consumers Relevant or Related Legislation: Unfair Terms in Consumer
    Contracts Regulations 1999"

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Apr 18, 2006
    #17
  18. Zitty wrote:

    > "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Zitty wrote:
    >>
    >>> It really /is/ rubbish too - takes *ages* to load, runs like a
    >>> tortoise in molasses, and looks awful.
    >>>

    >> version 2.02 - the latest - runs about the same speed as MS Office
    >> 2002......IF your machine is free of spyware, malware etc.

    >
    > Maybe it runs about the same speed, but it takes minutes to actually load
    > to get to the point of actually running. And yes, this machine, and the


    Six seconds here; I just timed it. Consider getting rid of the 386. :)

    > Linux server, are free of spyware and such.



    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Coming Soon: Filtering rules specific to various real news clients
    Blinky the Shark, Apr 18, 2006
    #18
  19. Zitty wrote:

    > "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Zitty wrote:
    >>
    >>> It really /is/ rubbish too - takes *ages* to load, runs like a
    >>> tortoise in molasses, and looks awful.

    >>
    >> version 2.02 - the latest - runs about the same speed as MS Office
    >> 2002......IF your machine is free of spyware, malware etc.

    >
    > Maybe it runs about the same speed, but it takes minutes to actually
    > load to get to the point of actually running. And yes, this machine,
    > and the Linux server, are free of spyware and such.


    On my P4 3.2GHz, 1GB ram pc, OOo Writer loads/opens and is ready for
    business in under six seconds. Calc takes about three seconds to load
    and be ready to start working on a new spreadsheet.

    Are you attempting to load it from a server using a workstation? That
    might slow down your load times.

    Otherwise, there must be something else wrong with your computer.

    --
    -bts
    -Warning: I brake for lawn deer
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Apr 18, 2006
    #19
  20. McWideGlide

    Ron Martell Guest

    "McWideGlide" <> wrote:

    >Is it possible to use Microsoft Office (same product key) on my desktop and
    >laptop with it registered on both computers? I have a feeling its no, but
    >maybe you guys know otherwise. Thanks.
    >


    Retail licenses for Microsoft Office normally include the provision
    that the same license can be installed on both a desktop and a laptop
    computer *provided* the same person is the principal user of both
    computers.

    Some volume licenses for Microsoft Office include a provision allowing
    the users of the volume license to install the same license on their
    home computer. The number of home installations cannot exceed the
    total number of (presumably business) installations authorized by the
    license. So if a business has a 10 user volume license with this
    provision then up to 10 of the employees of that business can each
    install it on one computer at their home.

    OEM Licenses and Educational licenses are usually restriced to
    installing on a single computer.

    The End User License Agreement for your actual copy of Microsoft
    Office will include detailed information as to whether or not you are
    allowed to install that particular license on more than one computer,
    and what the restrictions & limitations of that installation are. See
    the EULA.TXT file on the installation CD.


    Good luck

    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP (1997 - 2006)
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    "Anyone who thinks that they are too small to make a difference
    has never been in bed with a mosquito."
    Ron Martell, Apr 18, 2006
    #20
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