mcse vs. mcsa

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by SWE, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. SWE

    SWE Guest

    i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have a+, network+, just passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-216 shortly.

    from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the mcsa is easier to obtain, more about managing rather than implementing. (1) if there are two people in a company, one with mcse and one with mcsa, is the mcsa more likely to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't really see how you could be an mcsa and manage a network, without having the experience of an mcse. (2) that said, would it be worth taking the extra exam or two after i get my mcse, to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a management position? i've been doing network administration for about three years and eventually i'd like to step back from the day-to-day hands on.

    your thoughts and input would be appreciated.
     
    SWE, Aug 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. SWE

    AJS1976 Guest

    Most people consider the MCSE the higher ranking cert. An MCSA would just do the day-to-day crap, while an MCSE would design the network and put it in place. In theory anway.
    "SWE" <none@none> wrote in message news:...
    i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have a+, network+, just passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-216 shortly.

    from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the mcsa is easier to obtain, more about managing rather than implementing. (1) if there are two people in a company, one with mcse and one with mcsa, is the mcsa more likely to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't really see how you could be an mcsa and manage a network, without having the experience of an mcse. (2) that said, would it be worth taking the extra exam or two after i get my mcse, to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a management position? i've been doing network administration for about three years and eventually i'd like to step back from the day-to-day hands on.

    your thoughts and input would be appreciated.
     
    AJS1976, Aug 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. SWE

    JTT Guest

    I actually went for the MCSE as part of the requirements to be IP Certified
    with Cisco and also obtained my MCSA as a result of the tests I chose to get
    the MCSE. As a matter of fact, on the 6th test I took the survey asked when
    I planned on finishing my MCSA and I chose never, it wasn't part of my plan.
    I took the following tests in the order listed which resulted in both the
    MCSA and MCSE (was MCSA after 6 and MCSE after the 7th):
    70-270 Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft® Windows®
    XP Professional
    70-215 Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft® Windows®
    2000 Server
    70-216 Implementing and Administering a Microsoft® Windows® 2000
    Network Infrastructure
    70-217 Implementing and Administering a Microsoft® Windows® 2000
    Directory Services Infrastructure
    70-224 Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft® Exchange
    2000 Server
    70-218 Managing a Windows 2000 Network Environment
    70-220 Designing Security for a Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Network

    I'm not sure what to tell you on how the rest of the industry views it. I
    do know that if you were to apply at my company, I would choose someone that
    was MCSE over someone that was MCSA with everything else being the same. So
    honestly, I would look at the tests and go for the MCSE and get your MCSA on
    your way to that goal. I happened to choose tests that I had the most
    experience with when it came to electives, and it paid off.

    JTT

    "SWE" <none@none> wrote in message
    news:...
    i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have a+, network+, just
    passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-216 shortly.

    from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the mcsa is easier to
    obtain, more about managing rather than implementing. (1) if there are two
    people in a company, one with mcse and one with mcsa, is the mcsa more
    likely to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't really see how you
    could be an mcsa and manage a network, without having the experience of an
    mcse. (2) that said, would it be worth taking the extra exam or two after i
    get my mcse, to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a management
    position? i've been doing network administration for about three years and
    eventually i'd like to step back from the day-to-day hands on.

    your thoughts and input would be appreciated.
     
    JTT, Aug 28, 2003
    #3
  4. SWE

    Maestro Guest

    Go to Microsoft's website where all of your questions can
    be answered. I don't know where you got your information,
    but your notion of what an MCSE/MCSA are is wayyyyy off!

    http://www.microsoft.com/mcp

    >-----Original Message-----
    >i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have

    a+, network+, just passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-
    216 shortly.
    >
    >from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the

    mcsa is easier to obtain, more about managing rather than
    implementing. (1) if there are two people in a company,
    one with mcse and one with mcsa, is the mcsa more likely
    to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't really
    see how you could be an mcsa and manage a network, without
    having the experience of an mcse. (2) that said, would it
    be worth taking the extra exam or two after i get my mcse,
    to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a management
    position? i've been doing network administration for about
    three years and eventually i'd like to step back from the
    day-to-day hands on.
    >
    >your thoughts and input would be appreciated.
     
    Maestro, Aug 28, 2003
    #4
  5. SWE

    Maestro Guest

    This is gettting to be very scary. The two certs aren't
    even geared towards the same job description!!!

    >-----Original Message-----
    >I actually went for the MCSE as part of the requirements

    to be IP Certified
    >with Cisco and also obtained my MCSA as a result of the

    tests I chose to get
    >the MCSE. As a matter of fact, on the 6th test I took

    the survey asked when
    >I planned on finishing my MCSA and I chose never, it

    wasn't part of my plan.
    >I took the following tests in the order listed which

    resulted in both the
    >MCSA and MCSE (was MCSA after 6 and MCSE after the 7th):
    > 70-270 Installing, Configuring, and Administering

    Microsoft® Windows®
    >XP Professional
    > 70-215 Installing, Configuring, and Administering

    Microsoft® Windows®
    >2000 Server
    > 70-216 Implementing and Administering a Microsoft®

    Windows® 2000
    >Network Infrastructure
    > 70-217 Implementing and Administering a Microsoft®

    Windows® 2000
    >Directory Services Infrastructure
    > 70-224 Installing, Configuring, and Administering

    Microsoft® Exchange
    >2000 Server
    > 70-218 Managing a Windows 2000 Network Environment
    > 70-220 Designing Security for a Microsoft®

    Windows® 2000 Network
    >
    >I'm not sure what to tell you on how the rest of the

    industry views it. I
    >do know that if you were to apply at my company, I would

    choose someone that
    >was MCSE over someone that was MCSA with everything else

    being the same. So
    >honestly, I would look at the tests and go for the MCSE

    and get your MCSA on
    >your way to that goal. I happened to choose tests that I

    had the most
    >experience with when it came to electives, and it paid

    off.
    >
    >JTT
    >
    >"SWE" <none@none> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have

    a+, network+, just
    >passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-216 shortly.
    >
    >from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the

    mcsa is easier to
    >obtain, more about managing rather than implementing. (1)

    if there are two
    >people in a company, one with mcse and one with mcsa, is

    the mcsa more
    >likely to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't

    really see how you
    >could be an mcsa and manage a network, without having the

    experience of an
    >mcse. (2) that said, would it be worth taking the extra

    exam or two after i
    >get my mcse, to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a

    management
    >position? i've been doing network administration for

    about three years and
    >eventually i'd like to step back from the day-to-day

    hands on.
    >
    >your thoughts and input would be appreciated.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Maestro, Aug 28, 2003
    #5
  6. SWE

    S. O'Brien Guest

    "SWE" <none@none> wrote in message
    news:...
    i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have a+, network+, just
    passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-216 shortly.

    from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the mcsa is easier to
    obtain, more about managing rather than implementing. (1) if there are two
    people in a company, one with mcse and one with mcsa, is the mcsa more
    likely to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't really see how you
    could be an mcsa and manage a network, without having the experience of an
    mcse. (2) that said, would it be worth taking the extra exam or two after i
    get my mcse, to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a management
    position? i've been doing network administration for about three years and
    eventually i'd like to step back from the day-to-day hands on.

    your thoughts and input would be appreciated.

    _____________________________

    very simple... MCSA will get you a job as an inbound phone lackie (ie tech)
    MCSE will get you a job as an inbound phone lackie (ie tech). Maybe after 5
    years or so of experience you will see the difference between the two but
    right now? hell no!! Get both? Get one? pick one... depends on where you
    want to be in 5 years. You could get your MCSA, get that call center job
    and continue working for your MCSE... or you could get both and still be a
    phone lackie. Basically depends on your dedication to the field and your
    own future.

    I have my MCSE/MCSA 2000, CCNA, CNA, and A+... and guess where I was
    working???? A CALL CENTER!! Does that stop me? nope... studying for my
    2003 certs now... evenutally it will catch up with me and I will be ready
    for it.

    chose what is best for YOU... no one else

    lol ok I'm done being nice for one day :p

    --
    Sue MCNGP # 69

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
     
    S. O'Brien, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
  7. >
    > I have my MCSE/MCSA 2000, CCNA, CNA, and A+... and guess where I was
    > working???? A CALL CENTER!! Does that stop me? nope... studying for my
    > 2003 certs now... evenutally it will catch up with me and I will be ready
    > for it.
    >


    Geez...maybe you should give up on IT and start looking into being a
    software developer and getting your MCAD/MCSD instead.
     
    James D. Murray, Aug 28, 2003
    #7
  8. SWE

    S. O'Brien Guest

    "James D. Murray" <james{at}idstouch{dot}com> wrote in message
    news:uTdd%...
    > >
    > > I have my MCSE/MCSA 2000, CCNA, CNA, and A+... and guess where I was
    > > working???? A CALL CENTER!! Does that stop me? nope... studying for

    my
    > > 2003 certs now... evenutally it will catch up with me and I will be

    ready
    > > for it.
    > >

    >
    > Geez...maybe you should give up on IT and start looking into being a
    > software developer and getting your MCAD/MCSD instead.
    >
    >
    >

    no thanks... you need a certain thought pattern to be a developer... and it
    does not reside in my head... have to be realistic... I have a very
    mathematical/artisic brain (according to IQ testing)... so I can imagine
    what a network will look like but could not program any programs for the
    same reason... I could not picture code in my head to form a pattern... nice
    thought though

    :)
     
    S. O'Brien, Aug 28, 2003
    #8
  9. SWE

    roYal Guest

    an msca analayzes an existing network infastructure that might add services such as dns, dhcp and configure them, like an administrator; msce designs, architechs, and implements the network infrastructure.
    "SWE" <none@none> wrote in message news:...
    i'm currently pursuing my mcse (and ccna). i already have a+, network+, just passed 70-215, and taking 70-210 and 70-216 shortly.

    from what i've read about mcse and mcsa it seems like the mcsa is easier to obtain, more about managing rather than implementing. (1) if there are two people in a company, one with mcse and one with mcsa, is the mcsa more likely to be the supervisor/manager of the mcse? i don't really see how you could be an mcsa and manage a network, without having the experience of an mcse. (2) that said, would it be worth taking the extra exam or two after i get my mcse, to also be an mcsa, so that i could pursue a management position? i've been doing network administration for about three years and eventually i'd like to step back from the day-to-day hands on.

    your thoughts and input would be appreciated.
     
    roYal, Aug 29, 2003
    #9
  10. SWE

    Consultant Guest

    old mc donald had a farm and ----- was his name-o


    "Laura A. Robinson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > circa Thu, 28 Aug 2003 14:20:09 -0700, in
    > microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Maestro () said,
    > >
    > > This is gettting to be very scary. The two certs aren't=20
    > > even geared towards the same job description!!!
    > >
    > >

    > BINGO.
     
    Consultant, Sep 3, 2003
    #10
  11. circa Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:20:41 -0700, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Consultant
    () said,
    > old mc donald had a farm and ----- was his name-o
    >

    Excellent work, dear! Now let's try our ABCs...
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 4, 2003
    #11
  12. SWE

    Consultant Guest

    acb, easy as 213


    "Laura A. Robinson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > circa Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:20:41 -0700, in
    > microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Consultant
    > () said,
    > > old mc donald had a farm and ----- was his name-o
    > >

    > Excellent work, dear! Now let's try our ABCs...
     
    Consultant, Sep 4, 2003
    #12
  13. SWE

    billyw Guest

    ah the good old colonial schooling system seems tobe working a treat.

    i remember "one time at band camp" a while ago when i worked for a large US
    company they were opening a plant in illinois and were quite pleased that
    they were able to get above 80% literacy rate.

    some people never secure their memo's

    "Consultant" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > acb, easy as 213
    >
    >
    > "Laura A. Robinson" <> wrote in

    message
    > news:...
    > > circa Wed, 3 Sep 2003 13:20:41 -0700, in
    > > microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Consultant
    > > () said,
    > > > old mc donald had a farm and ----- was his name-o
    > > >

    > > Excellent work, dear! Now let's try our ABCs...

    >
    >
     
    billyw, Sep 4, 2003
    #13
  14. circa Thu, 4 Sep 2003 16:11:39 +0100, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, billyw () said,
    >
    > ah the good old colonial schooling system seems tobe working a treat.
    >
    > i remember "one time at band camp" a while ago when i worked for a large US
    > company they were opening a plant in illinois and were quite pleased that
    > they were able to get above 80% literacy rate.
    >
    > some people never secure their memo's
    >

    Some people know where to place apostrophes...
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 4, 2003
    #14
  15. SWE

    Consultant Guest

    whats' an astrophepe

    "Laura A. Robinson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > circa Thu, 4 Sep 2003 16:11:39 +0100, in
    > microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, billyw () said,
    > >
    > > ah the good old colonial schooling system seems tobe working a treat.
    > >
    > > i remember "one time at band camp" a while ago when i worked for a large

    US
    > > company they were opening a plant in illinois and were quite pleased

    that
    > > they were able to get above 80% literacy rate.
    > >
    > > some people never secure their memo's
    > >

    > Some people know where to place apostrophes...
     
    Consultant, Sep 4, 2003
    #15
  16. SWE

    Jtyc Guest

    > whats' an astrophepe

    It connects to the flux capacitor.
     
    Jtyc, Sep 4, 2003
    #16
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