MCSD vs. MCSE

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Nov 16, 2005.

  1. I know they are two completely different animals but something has been
    bugging me and I hate to ask because its kind of an unfair question. Is MCSE
    as hard and comprehensive in intellectual effort as MCSD.

    Reason I ask is because I know of a college that awards 8 college credit for
    MCSE and max of 5 credit hours for MCSD. In fact, on the MCSD they are
    missing the elective exams which are not easy by any stretch.
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Nov 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=

    DST Guest

    These are the certs I have:
    - MCSD for Microsoft .NET
    - MCDBA for Microsoft SQL Server 2000
    - MCSE: Security for Microsoft Windows Server 2003

    I'm a developer at heart (25 years of programming), the MCSE (Windows
    2003) was harder for me than the MCSD (.NET).

    DST
    DST, Nov 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Professionally do you find it useful to have both MCSD and MCSE?
    becuase in my mind the two would rarely mesh together but I am somewhat of a
    newbie

    "DST" wrote:

    > These are the certs I have:
    > - MCSD for Microsoft .NET
    > - MCDBA for Microsoft SQL Server 2000
    > - MCSE: Security for Microsoft Windows Server 2003
    >
    > I'm a developer at heart (25 years of programming), the MCSE (Windows
    > 2003) was harder for me than the MCSD (.NET).
    >
    > DST
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Nov 20, 2005
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=

    DST Guest

    As a developer it's not useful to have both MCSD and MCSE. When you
    develop enterprise applications it's good to know something about
    servers, but certainly not at the level of an MCSE. And there is stuff
    that's practicaly not covered in the MCSE curriculum (like COM+ and
    clustering) but is good to master as an enterprise developer.

    My work has evolved from pure development to security architecture in a
    Windows Environment. My boss wanted me to get some Windows security
    training, so we decided that I would take the MCSE 2003 Security track.

    DST
    DST, Nov 21, 2005
    #4
  5. Well all those certs are extremely impressive in my book. I would love a
    developer job that is strictly learning new technologies and advising the
    firm what can and can not be done. Funny because I started my career change
    having an adverse opinion toward anything other then coding.

    "DST" wrote:

    > As a developer it's not useful to have both MCSD and MCSE. When you
    > develop enterprise applications it's good to know something about
    > servers, but certainly not at the level of an MCSE. And there is stuff
    > that's practicaly not covered in the MCSE curriculum (like COM+ and
    > clustering) but is good to master as an enterprise developer.
    >
    > My work has evolved from pure development to security architecture in a
    > Windows Environment. My boss wanted me to get some Windows security
    > training, so we decided that I would take the MCSE 2003 Security track.
    >
    > DST
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Nov 22, 2005
    #5
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