Mass on an incline OT

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Acetyldehyde, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. Acetyldehyde

    Acetyldehyde Guest

    When I push 100 Kg straight up it weighs 100kg.

    When I push 100 Kg up a 45 deg. slope (assume 0.0 friction) how much does it
    weigh?
     
    Acetyldehyde, Feb 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Acetyldehyde

    Peter Guest

    Acetyldehyde wrote:

    > When I push 100 Kg straight up it weighs 100kg.
    >
    > When I push 100 Kg up a 45 deg. slope (assume 0.0 friction) how much does
    > it weigh?


    the weight component down the slope is
    100 * SIN(45)
    = 71 kg

    When you're calculating this in a spreadsheet or calculator, check whether
    the SIN function works in degrees or radians.

    HTH

    Peter
     
    Peter, Feb 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Acetyldehyde

    Robert Cooze Guest

    Acetyldehyde wrote:
    > When I push 100 Kg straight up it weighs 100kg.
    >
    > When I push 100 Kg up a 45 deg. slope (assume 0.0 friction) how much does it
    > weigh?
    >
    >

    LOL Go to school and do 6th form physics

    answer it will still weigh the same

    I think the question should be along the lines of

    How much force
    How much power
    How much work

    In answer if you use the same amount of effort and 1/2 the time you will
    have used about 1/2 the power
    Or use 1/2 the force and the same time you will have used 1/2 the power

    also weight can be measured in mass or force mass changes in gravity
    force does not ( I may have totally got this wrong ) its been 26 years
    since I have had anything to do with 6th form physics

    Let the flame War start


    ......................"""""",,,,,''''''??? (please insert the punctuation
    as you see fit)

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
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    Robert Cooze, Feb 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Acetyldehyde

    AD. Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 07:31:03 +1300, Robert Cooze wrote:


    > also weight can be measured in mass or force mass changes in gravity force
    > does not ( I may have totally got this wrong )


    Well you got the last bit right :)

    Weight is a force due to gravity measured in newtons, mass is a constant
    property of the object measured in kg. Roughly speaking, mass is related
    to inertia ie how much effort is required to accelerate something - I
    forget the exact distinction between mass and inertia :)

    And as for what the original poster was asking about how does weight
    change when pushing something up a slope, well depending on what they
    really were asking, the weight doesn't change (ignoring any significant
    changes in gravitational field by going really really high), but the force
    required to hold it on the slope is the component of weight down the slope
    (as Peter mentioned).

    Only 16 years since 6 form physics :)

    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Feb 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Acetyldehyde

    T-Boy Guest

    In article <403e4f38$>, says...
    > Acetyldehyde wrote:
    > > When I push 100 Kg straight up it weighs 100kg.
    > >
    > > When I push 100 Kg up a 45 deg. slope (assume 0.0 friction) how much does it
    > > weigh?
    > >
    > >

    > LOL Go to school and do 6th form physics
    >
    > answer it will still weigh the same


    No it won't. It's mass will be the same. It's weight (a measure of
    *force* - will not be the same). (As you managed to correctly conclude
    later on)

    --
    Duncan
     
    T-Boy, Feb 26, 2004
    #5
  6. Acetyldehyde

    Keith Guest

    T-Boy <> wrote:
    >In article <403e4f38$>, says...
    >> Acetyldehyde wrote:
    >> > When I push 100 Kg straight up it weighs 100kg.
    >> >
    >> > When I push 100 Kg up a 45 deg. slope (assume 0.0 friction) how much does it
    >> > weigh?
    >> >
    >> >

    >> LOL Go to school and do 6th form physics
    >>
    >> answer it will still weigh the same

    >
    >No it won't. It's mass will be the same. It's weight (a measure of
    >*force* - will not be the same). (As you managed to correctly conclude
    >later on)


    For a graphical representation (and lots of other physics stuff) see:
    http://www.walter-fendt.de/ph11e/inclplane.htm
     
    Keith, Feb 26, 2004
    #6

  7. >No it won't. It's mass will be the same. It's weight (a measure of
    >*force* - will not be the same). (As you managed to correctly conclude
    >later on)
    >


    If you put a scale under on the incline surely it would weigh the same??
    but would require less force (but the same toatal energy?) to push it.

    Isnt this like the 'theory' that if you weigh yourself with scales on a shag
    pile capert it will give a lower reading.
     
    Steve Robertson, Feb 27, 2004
    #7
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