"MASS-HACKER of U.S. Government Systems To Get Mere Slap On Wrist!UK Fights His Extradition!"

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Suppurating Tool, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. Citizens in the land of bad food and bad teeth shield supposed
    AUTISTIC criminal out of sympathy for creepy nerd!

    Let's hope this low-life soon gets cancer and dies a slow and horribly
    painful,
    disabling, and stinking death!
    ---------------------
    "British Hacker's Supporters Battle Extradition to U.S."

    By Karla Adam
    Special to The Washington Post
    Friday, August 28, 2009



    LONDON, Aug. 27 -- Supporters of autistic British computer hacker Gary
    McKinnon attempted to rally support on Thursday for the man who is
    fighting extradition to the United States to face federal charges in
    Virginia and New Jersey for penetrating dozens of U.S. government
    computers.

    Sitting in his bedroom in north London shortly after the Sept. 11,
    2001, terrorist attacks, McKinnon exploited security problems in a
    variety of computer programs to tap into dozens of U.S. government
    computers, including at NASA, the Pentagon and more than a dozen
    military installations in 14 states.

    At the time, Paul J. McNulty, then U.S. attorney for the Eastern
    District of Virginia, called it the "the biggest hack of military
    computers ever detected." McKinnon was indicted in Alexandria and New
    Jersey in November 2002 on eight counts of computer fraud. He
    explained his actions by saying he was looking for UFOs. But he has
    yet to be brought to the United States.

    For the last seven years, McKinnon's lawyers have battled his
    extradition. They have sought to have the case tried in Britain, where
    if he was convicted the penalties would be less severe and he could be
    imprisoned closer to his family.

    But in February, British authorities refused to charge him or have the
    U.S. charges heard here. The Crown Prosecution Service said it would
    be best to prosecute McKinnon in the United States and that his
    actions were not "random experiments" but "a deliberate effort to
    breach U.S. defense systems at a critical time which caused well
    documented damage."

    And last month, McKinnon lost an appeal of the British government's
    decision not to try him here and to extradite him to the United
    States.

    McKinnon's lawyers are applying to appeal that decision to the newly-
    formed Supreme Court, which opens on Oct. 1 and replaces the judicial
    role of the House of Lords, currently the highest court in the
    country. If that fails, they will appeal to the European Court of
    Human Rights, supporters said.

    McKinnon has admitted to hacking into 97 U.S. government computers
    between February 2001 and March 2002.

    His supporters argue that he should not be extradited to face the U.S.
    charges because he has Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism that he
    was diagnosed with last year. They say the diagnosis explains his
    obsession with hacking. His family says that rather than being
    America's worst cyber-terrorist, he is a vulnerable eccentric who
    could become suicidal if removed from his family.

    They also deny the U.S. allegations that his actions resulted in
    $700,000 in damage.

    Standing outside the U.S. embassy in central London, Janis Sharp,
    McKinnon's mother, said in an interview that the hacking was "the most
    incredibly stupid thing for him to do," and explained he was partly
    motivated by conspiracy theories and was trying to unearth new
    evidence around the Sept. 11 attacks, and partly by his "childhood
    obsession" of finding proof that UFOs exist. "Please, Obama, he'd
    never hurt anyone. Don't let the first person you extradite be a good,
    gentle man with Asperger's," she pleaded.

    McKinnon, 43, has become a cause celebre here, with backing from the
    Daily Mail, a widely read tabloid that frequently campaigns for
    populist causes, as well as high-profile figures including David
    Cameron, the leader of the Conservative Party; Sarah Brown, the prime
    minister's wife; and musicians such as Sting and Peter Gabriel.
    Supporters have set up a Web site called Free Gary at http://freegary.org.uk.

    The American Civil Liberties Union also released a letter in support
    of McKinnon on Thursday. The organization said the case highlights
    what some people here think is a lopsided extradition treaty between
    the United States and Britain, skewed against British citizens.

    Part of the current uproar over McKinnon's case stems from a general
    mood that Britain is kowtowing to the United States, said Ben Brandon,
    an extradition lawyer in London. He pointed out similar dismay when
    three British bankers linked to Enron were extradited to the United
    States in 2006, and said that in both cases, campaigners effectively
    "tapped in to general feeling that we are in America's pocket, that we
    are not exercising our own judgment, that we are letting the Americans
    do our job for us."

    While McKinnon's campaigners point out he could receive a maximum
    sentence of 60 years in U.S. prison, legal analysts said that if he
    was convicted in the United States, he would probably serve eight to
    10 years.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/27/AR2009082703906.html

    ===========
    BUT ... at least the U.S. will make it tougher for his kind of shit to
    physically enter our "Land Of The Free."

    ---------------------
    "Bush's Search Policy For Travelers Is Kept"

    "Obama Officials Say Oversight Will Grow"

    By Ellen Nakashima
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Friday, August 28, 2009

    The Obama administration will largely preserve Bush-era procedures
    allowing the government to search -- without suspicion of wrongdoing
    -- the contents of a traveler's laptop computer, cellphone or other
    electronic device, although officials said new policies would expand
    oversight of such inspections.

    The policy, disclosed Thursday in a pair of Department of Homeland
    Security directives, describes more fully than did the Bush
    administration the procedures by which travelers' laptops, iPods,
    cameras and other digital devices can be searched and seized when they
    cross a U.S. border. And it sets time limits for completing searches.

    But representatives of civil liberties and travelers groups say they
    see little substantive difference between the Bush-era policy, which
    prompted controversy, and this one.

    "It's a disappointing ratification of the suspicionless search policy
    put in place by the Bush administration," said Catherine Crump, staff
    attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union. "It provides a lot of
    procedural safeguards, but it doesn't deal with the fundamental
    problem, which is that under the policy, government officials are free
    to search people's laptops and cellphones for any reason whatsoever."

    Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano yesterday framed the new
    policy as an enhancement of oversight. "Keeping Americans safe in an
    increasingly digital world depends on our ability to lawfully screen
    materials entering the United States," she said in a statement. "The
    new directives announced today strike the balance between respecting
    the civil liberties and privacy of all travelers while ensuring DHS
    can take the lawful actions necessary to secure our borders."

    For instance, searches conducted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection
    officers should now generally take no more than 5 days, and no more
    than 30 days for searches by Immigration and Customs Enforcement
    special agents. The directives also require for the first time that
    automated tools be developed to ensure the reliable tracking of
    statistics relating to searches, and that audits be conducted
    periodically to ensure the guidelines are being followed, officials
    said.

    Such measures drew praise from House Homeland Security Committee
    Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), who called the new policy "a major
    step forward," and from Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.), who
    introduced legislation this year to strengthen protections for
    travelers whose devices are searched.

    But the civil liberties community was disappointed.

    "Under the policy begun by Bush and now continued by Obama, the
    government can open your laptop and read your medical records,
    financial records, e-mails, work product and personal correspondence
    -- all without any suspicion of illegal activity," said Elizabeth
    Goitein, who leads the liberty and national security project at the
    nonprofit Brennan Center for Justice.

    Goitein, formerly a counsel to Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.), said
    the Bush policy itself "broke sharply" with previous Customs
    directives, which required reasonable suspicion before agents could
    read the contents of documents. Feingold last year introduced
    legislation to restore the requirement.

    Jack Riepe, spokesman for the Association of Corporate Travel
    Executives, said the guidelines "still have many of the inherent
    weaknesses" of the Bush-era policy.

    Between October 2008 and Aug. 11, more than 221 million travelers
    passed through CBP checkpoints. About 1,000 laptop searches were
    performed, only 46 in-depth, the DHS said.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/27/AR2009082704065.html
    Suppurating Tool, Aug 29, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Suppurating Tool

    mindy Guest

    Re: "MASS-HACKER of U.S. Government Systems To Get Mere Slap OnWrist! UK Fights His Extradition!"

    On Aug 29, 6:08 am, Suppurating Tool <> wrote:
    > Citizens in the land of bad food and bad teeth shield supposed
    > AUTISTIC criminal out of sympathy for creepy nerd!
    >
    > Let's hope this low-life soon gets cancer and dies a slow and horribly
    > painful,
    > disabling, and stinking death!
    > ---------------------
    > "British Hacker's Supporters Battle Extradition to U.S."
    >
    > By Karla Adam
    > Special to The Washington Post
    > Friday, August 28, 2009
    >
    > LONDON, Aug. 27 -- Supporters of autistic British computer hacker Gary
    > McKinnon attempted to rally support on Thursday for the man who is
    > fighting extradition to the United States to face federal charges in
    > Virginia and New Jersey for penetrating dozens of U.S. government
    > computers.
    >
    > Sitting in his bedroom in north London shortly after the Sept. 11,
    > 2001, terrorist attacks, McKinnon exploited security problems in a
    > variety of computer programs to tap into dozens of U.S. government
    > computers, including at NASA, the Pentagon and more than a dozen
    > military installations in 14 states.
    >
    > At the time, Paul J. McNulty, then U.S. attorney for the Eastern
    > District of Virginia, called it the "the biggest hack of military
    > computers ever detected." McKinnon was indicted in Alexandria and New
    > Jersey in November 2002 on eight counts of computer fraud. He
    > explained his actions by saying he was looking for UFOs. But he has
    > yet to be brought to the United States.
    >
    > For the last seven years, McKinnon's lawyers have battled his
    > extradition. They have sought to have the case tried in Britain, where
    > if he was convicted the penalties would be less severe and he could be
    > imprisoned closer to his family.
    >
    > But in February, British authorities refused to charge him or have the
    > U.S. charges heard here. The Crown Prosecution Service said it would
    > be best to prosecute McKinnon in the United States and that his
    > actions were not "random experiments" but "a deliberate effort to
    > breach U.S. defense systems at a critical time which caused well
    > documented damage."
    >
    > And last month, McKinnon lost an appeal of the British government's
    > decision not to try him here and to extradite him to the United
    > States.
    >
    > McKinnon's lawyers are applying to appeal that decision to the newly-
    > formed Supreme Court, which opens on Oct. 1 and replaces the judicial
    > role of the House of Lords, currently the highest court in the
    > country. If that fails, they will appeal to the European Court of
    > Human Rights, supporters said.
    >
    > McKinnon has admitted to hacking into 97 U.S. government computers
    > between February 2001 and March 2002.
    >
    > His supporters argue that he should not be extradited to face the U.S.
    > charges because he has Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism that he
    > was diagnosed with last year. They say the diagnosis explains his
    > obsession with hacking. His family says that rather than being
    > America's worst cyber-terrorist, he is a vulnerable eccentric who
    > could become suicidal if removed from his family.
    >
    > They also deny the U.S. allegations that his actions resulted in
    > $700,000 in damage.
    >
    > Standing outside the U.S. embassy in central London, Janis Sharp,
    > McKinnon's mother, said in an interview that the hacking was "the most
    > incredibly stupid thing for him to do," and explained he was partly
    > motivated by conspiracy theories and was trying to unearth new
    > evidence around the Sept. 11 attacks, and partly by his "childhood
    > obsession" of finding proof that UFOs exist. "Please, Obama, he'd
    > never hurt anyone. Don't let the first person you extradite be a good,
    > gentle man with Asperger's," she pleaded.
    >
    > McKinnon, 43, has become a cause celebre here, with backing from the
    > Daily Mail, a widely read tabloid that frequently campaigns for
    > populist causes, as well as high-profile figures including David
    > Cameron, the leader of the Conservative Party; Sarah Brown, the prime
    > minister's wife; and musicians such as Sting and Peter Gabriel.
    > Supporters have set up a Web site called Free Gary athttp://freegary.org.uk.
    >
    > The American Civil Liberties Union also released a letter in support
    > of McKinnon on Thursday. The organization said the case highlights
    > what some people here think is a lopsided extradition treaty between
    > the United States and Britain, skewed against British citizens.
    >
    > Part of the current uproar over McKinnon's case stems from a general
    > mood that Britain is kowtowing to the United States, said Ben Brandon,
    > an extradition lawyer in London. He pointed out similar dismay when
    > three British bankers linked to Enron were extradited to the United
    > States in 2006, and said that in both cases, campaigners effectively
    > "tapped in to general feeling that we are in America's pocket, that we
    > are not exercising our own judgment, that we are letting the Americans
    > do our job for us."
    >
    > While McKinnon's campaigners point out he could receive a maximum
    > sentence of 60 years in U.S. prison, legal analysts said that if he
    > was convicted in the United States, he would probably serve eight to
    > 10 years.
    >
    > http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/27/AR200...
    >
    > ===========
    > BUT ... at least the U.S. will make it tougher for his kind of shit to
    > physically enter our "Land Of The Free."
    >
    > ---------------------
    > "Bush's Search Policy For Travelers Is Kept"
    >
    > "Obama Officials Say Oversight Will Grow"
    >
    > By Ellen Nakashima
    > Washington Post Staff Writer
    > Friday, August 28, 2009
    >
    > The Obama administration will largely preserve Bush-era procedures
    > allowing the government to search -- without suspicion of wrongdoing
    > -- the contents of a traveler's laptop computer, cellphone or other
    > electronic device, although officials said new policies would expand
    > oversight of such inspections.
    >
    > The policy, disclosed Thursday in a pair of Department of Homeland
    > Security directives, describes more fully than did the Bush
    > administration the procedures by which travelers' laptops, iPods,
    > cameras and other digital devices can be searched and seized when they
    > cross a U.S. border. And it sets time limits for completing searches.
    >
    > But representatives of civil liberties and travelers groups say they
    > see little substantive difference between the Bush-era policy, which
    > prompted controversy, and this one.
    >
    > "It's a disappointing ratification of the suspicionless search policy
    > put in place by the Bush administration," said Catherine Crump, staff
    > attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union. "It provides a lot of
    > procedural safeguards, but it doesn't deal with the fundamental
    > problem, which is that under the policy, government officials are free
    > to search people's laptops and cellphones for any reason whatsoever."
    >
    > Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano yesterday framed the new
    > policy as an enhancement of oversight. "Keeping Americans safe in an
    > increasingly digital world depends on our ability to lawfully screen
    > materials entering the United States," she said in a statement. "The
    > new directives announced today strike the balance between respecting
    > the civil liberties and privacy of all travelers while ensuring DHS
    > can take the lawful actions necessary to secure our borders."
    >
    > For instance, searches conducted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection
    > officers should now generally take no more than 5 days, and no more
    > than 30 days for searches by Immigration and Customs Enforcement
    > special agents. The directives also require for the first time that
    > automated tools be developed to ensure the reliable tracking of
    > statistics relating to searches, and that audits be conducted
    > periodically to ensure the guidelines are being followed, officials
    > said.
    >
    > Such measures drew praise from House Homeland Security Committee
    > Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), who called the new policy "a major
    > step forward," and from Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.), who
    > introduced legislation this year to strengthen protections for
    > travelers whose devices are searched.
    >
    > But the civil liberties community was disappointed.
    >
    > "Under the policy begun by Bush and now continued by Obama, the
    > government can open your laptop and read your medical records,
    > financial records, e-mails, work product and personal correspondence
    > -- all without any suspicion of illegal activity," said Elizabeth
    > Goitein, who leads the liberty and national security project at the
    > nonprofit Brennan Center for Justice.
    >
    > Goitein, formerly a counsel to Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.), said
    > the Bush policy itself "broke sharply" with previous Customs
    > directives, which required reasonable suspicion before agents could
    > read the contents of documents. Feingold last year introduced
    > legislation to restore the requirement.
    >
    > Jack Riepe, spokesman for the Association of Corporate Travel
    > Executives, said the guidelines "still have many of the inherent
    > weaknesses" of the Bush-era policy.
    >
    > Between October 2008 and Aug. 11, more than 221 million travelers
    > passed through CBP checkpoints. About 1,000 laptop searches were
    > performed, only 46 in-depth, the DHS said.
    >
    > http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/27/AR200...


    I love living in the land of the 'free'... WHAT?
    mindy, Aug 29, 2009
    #2
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  3. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    sad, sad, sad.... U.S. government will do anything to have likes of Pablo Escobar or Carlos Trinidad or for that matter any drug cartel spearhead extradited from Central/South America and tried but when it comes nabbing black-hatters Government is lackluster. I don't know why, these SOBs do more damage than drug lords.
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2009
    Jyoti Ballabh, Sep 10, 2009
    #3
  4. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    Well, after my last comment I have been getting numerous mails from presumably alleged supporters of Gary. As much as I sympathize with Gary's predicament (Asperger's Syndrome), this in no way justifies for what he did. Then to make things worse, he has the audacity to lie blatantly for what he has done. He may be a compulsive hacker but dude who are you trying to fool when you cite that whatever happened was "accidental" and not "deliberate". I don't know what to think of the loathsome hacker who hacks into the USG Databases with malicious intent just a day after 9/11, knowing that the United States Cyber Security portfolio were the weakest then. It's like standing on my head when I am drowning. You got to realize something, when you penetrate any classified network, you may have all the best intentions in mind (sighting the UFOs or just mere compulsion), you render the entire network vulnerable to the predators who are more than willing to "walk down the path you have paved" and it's them who are a menace.

    The United States Government should set a preponderance by convicting you. Gary, instead of going on trial just plead guilty to whatever you have done; the United States Department of Justice appreciates it this way. You plead guilty, you will get up to 3 years (max) in a Federal Prison.
    Jyoti Ballabh, Sep 28, 2009
    #4
  5. Suppurating Tool

    Nathan C.

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Well written and I especially agree on that part where you have explained the repercussions of guilty plea as opposed to going on trial in the Court of Law.
    Nathan C., Oct 1, 2009
    #5
  6. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    As a matter of fact, I do know of a very similar case. In Mukhtaar Vs Holder, the session Judge sentenced the respondent for a period of 60 months after the guilty plea. The respondent was arraigned and indicted on the charges of defrauding the United States Government for a sum of 1.2 million dollars and a conspiracy to defraud the Government for over 6 million. He plead guilty and the Judge sentenced him for 60 months. He later filed for an Appeal on grounds of compassion, the Court of Appeals reduced his sentence to 27 months. Had he gone on trial and then been convicted he would have gotten atl east 13 years. The difference between him and Gary- Gary is accused of causing a damage to the USG to the tune of 700,000 which by any standards is an aggravated felony (any amount more than 10,000). There is another subtle difference. In the former case the charges were filed by the IRS but in McKinnon's case it's FBI, NSA, DoD, etc..
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2009
    Jyoti Ballabh, Oct 4, 2009
    #6
  7. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    LONDON, England (CNN) -- Gary McKinnon, the hacker who broke into Pentagon and NASA computers, was at risk of suicide Friday after losing an effort to fight extradition to the United States, his attorney said. "This is the wholesale destruction and bullying of a small individual by the United States and now our own government," attorney Karen Todner said in a statement.

    McKinnon's mother Janis Sharp described her son as "suicidal."

    The British government did not respond.

    McKinnon, a British citizen, has admitted breaking the law and intentionally gaining unauthorized access to U.S. government computers.

    The U.S. government says McKinnon carried out the biggest military computer hacking of all time, accessing 97 computers from his home in London for a year starting in March 2001, and costing the government about $1 million. U.S. authorities want him extradited to face trial in the United States.

    McKinnon, currently free on bail in England, has said he was simply doing research to find out whether the U.S. government was covering up the existence of UFOs.

    McKinnon bases his case partly on the fact that he has Asperger's syndrome, a type of autism. He had hoped to bring his case before the nation's newly-formed Supreme Court. But the court rejected the request Friday.

    McKinnon has one effort left -- to appeal to the home secretary.

    "The effect on Gary of these proceedings and impending extradition has been, and is, devastating," Todner's statement said. "He is a highly vulnerable man in a very fragile state and this is a huge blow to him and his family."

    McKinnon is thought to have acted alone, with no known connection to any terrorist organization, said Paul McNulty, the former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia.
    advertisement

    A U.S. federal grand jury indicted McKinnon on seven counts of computer fraud and related activity. If convicted, he would face a maximum of 10 years in prison on each count and a $250,000 fine.

    McKinnon has said it was easy for him to access the secret files.

    X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X----X---X

    Ok, so what's the first thing that comes to my mind when I read this. Should I feel sorry for the guy or should I mock his predicament by holding him responsible for this fate. Hard to tell, isn't it? In the past few days, I have done my share of research about the whole debacle and needless to say, Gary McKinnon might be the best code-breaker and encryptor I have ever seen. His digital prints in the "hatters" community is insurmountable and indisputable. When he says that "he breached into the secret file with considerable ease", he is not lying. In simpler words, he is a branded material. But Gary, there is something called - drawing the line somewhere, as the old saying goes "If you **** in your pants, you can stay warm only so long". People don't realize it until they go on trial. I know whatever I write in this blog, you and your peers get to read it. Please heed to what I say, plead guilty to whatever you have done. The United States Department of Justice appreciates it this way. If you go on trial, you can mark my words- You are not going to beat your case. You have received a huge media coverage in the United States and the "Anti-Gary McKinnon" wave just keeps crescendoing among the masses here. So, do the right thing.
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2009
    Jyoti Ballabh, Oct 10, 2009
    #7
  8. Suppurating Tool

    schultzeecs

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    lol. Nice words. Jyoti's comments are off the hook on this one. But why are you sympathizing with him? The term "Hacking" as defined in the Webster Dictionary is - an ingenious act or deed carried out as a spoof with no pre-determined intention of hurting or causing harm to others. What we do here at MIT is "hack" and the world loves it. What this guy did is terrorism. "Branded MIT material"----- are you ****ing kidding me? You know how much I dislike that part of your blog. He is a remorseful, low-life being and should rot in hell. US Government should hang this mf to death or give him electric chair. How can you ever compare his skills with ours? We are for the Government and MIT's allegiance to the United States Government is one of its kind. Our guys came up with the NAPALM during the second world war which killed more than 3 million Japs. MIT was the birthplace of the Manhattan project. No other Institute in USA gets more grant for the Defense projects than MIT. Light Combat, Thermal Radar, F-16s, MIG remodelling you name is, we did it.

    Jyoti, I like all your points, it's just that part of your blog which bothers me. Make the necessary corrections, please.
    schultzeecs, Oct 12, 2009
    #8
  9. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    wow, it seems that my own folks have staged a coup against me. I was just making a mention of the fact that Gary McKinnon is a skilled programmer but it's his motives that screwed him up. Let me make this clear, I am not making anything personal. It's not the Strawman Debtor Gary McKinnon who I am after but it's his work that motivates me to go to such an extent. I would be blogging my heart out in the same way had it been anyone else in Gary's place. Had it been you or me in this scenario, our fates would have been the same. You would be languishing in some Cahootz operated by Langley, VA. I would do my time in some Fed Prison and then be deported.

    Allegiance to the United States? If I am here alive, free, working on miraculous projects- it's all because of this country. Given the kind of work I do, I should be last person with a questionable allegiance. I know the amount of work it takes to put the files and DB together. Besides the capital investment it's so labour-intensive. So, when a prick like that does something so stupid, it hurts.

    Of course, I am disappointed but instead of passing a judgment online, I let the United States Department of Justice do the needful.

    yea and MIT RULZZZZZZZZZZZ. Undisputed Number Uno since 1861.

    Keep an eye on the Ig Nobel Prize segment that I will be starting soon.
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2009
    Jyoti Ballabh, Oct 12, 2009
    #9
  10. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    Home Sec Alan Johnson being pressurized by the House of Commons to halt extradition

    MPs' bombshell letter explodes Home Secretary's claim that law makes him powerless to halt extradition

    Alan Johnson was last night told by a powerful group of MPs that he can and must halt the extradition of Gary McKinnon.

    In a devastating letter, the Home Affairs Select Committee flatly rejected Mr Johnson's claim that he is powerless to intervene.

    Gary, who has Asperger's syndrome and is said to be suicidal, is due to be handed over to the U.S. under the controversial Extradition Act.

    There he faces up to 60 years in jail for hacking into Pentagon and Nasa computers while searching for proof of alien life.

    But the Labour chairman of the committee, Keith Vaz, said the 'precarious state' of Gary's mental health meant his removal should be stopped.

    The letter also calls for a 'comprehensive review' of the entire Extradition Act - which is widely considered imbalanced against British citizens.

    It is a stunning vindication for Gary's supporters, and will pile enormous pressure on Mr Johnson to change his stance.

    Earlier this year, the Mail presented the Home Secretary with evidence from two leading extradition lawyers stating that he could stop the removal on health grounds.

    But Mr Johnson - while refusing to publish his own legal advice - stubbornly insisted that this was not the case.

    Now - after studying the legal opinion obtained by the Mail, and holding a public evidence session with Mr Johnson and Gary's mother Janis this week - the Home Affairs committee has sided with Gary, 43, and this newspaper.
    Home Secretary Alan Johnson arrives at Downing Street for a cabinet meeting
    Keith Vaz

    Bombshell: Alan Johnson has been told by the Home Affairs Select Committee - chaired by Keith Vaz (right) - that he can stop McKinnon's extradition

    The letter from Mr Vaz - a former minister - to the Home Secretary says: 'We received a clear legal opinion... that the scope for the exercise of discretion by the Home Secretary is greater than you believe.

    'Because of Mr McKinnon's precarious state of mental health, the Committee is of the view that he should not be extradited to the U.S.A. and you should exercise your discretion in this case.'

    Officially, Mr Johnson has 'stopped the clock' on Gary's removal to the U.S while he considers new medical evidence of the danger he may take his own life if extradited.


    More...

    * Gary McKinnon's mother snubbed in Commons by Alan Johnson

    A decision is expected later this month, but the Home Secretary continues to insist his hands are tied.

    If he allows the extradition to proceed, he would be flying in the face of evidence from lawyers, autism experts and now one of Parliament's most influential committees.

    Gary's mother - who has warned Gary would rather die than be extradited, and that he is 'suicidal' - was delighted by the committee's letter.
    Janis Sharp, the mother of Gary McKinnon

    Long fight: McKinnon's mother Janis Sharp hopes Johnson listens to the committee

    She said: 'It's excellent news and I am incredibly pleased they have come to the same conclusion as everyone else - apart, that is, from the Home Secretary and his advisers.

    'I appreciated the careful way that the MPs on the committee listened to my evidence and considered my written submission to them. Now I hope Mr Johnson listens to what the committee is telling him.

    'I am delighted that MPs from all the political parties are standing up for what is right and just for Gary.'

    Gary's solicitor, Karen Todner, said: 'We are very pleased with the committee's decision. It reinforces what Gary's legal team - and serious legal opinion - has consistently argued.

    'The Home Secretary does have the power to intervene in Gary's case - and he should halt his extradition.'

    Liberal Democrat spokesman Chris Huhne said: 'The Home Affairs Select Committee is telling Alan Johnson what he has already been told and what he should have known.

    'It is not in the interests of justice to send a British citizen with mental health problems to face decades in an American jail.

    'The Home Secretary must put an end to this shameful episode and then renegotiate the extradition treaty so this fiasco is not repeated.'

    The evidence the Mail obtained from human rights QC Tim Owen and Julian Knowles, a leading extradition lawyer, categorically stated: 'The Extradition Act 2003 gives the English courts the primary responsibility - but, importantly, not the exclusive responsibility - for ensuring that... safeguards are maintained. This is because both the courts and the Home Secretary have a role to play in extradition.

    'It is therefore plain that the Home Secretary has the power - and indeed the duty - to intervene in any extradition case even after the court process has ended if the evidence establishes that there is a real risk of a human rights breach should extradition proceed.

    'Statements made to the contrary by the Government are obviously and plainly wrong.'

    Lord Carlile, Mr Johnson's adviser on terror laws, has also said he is satisfied that the minister does have the power.

    He said placing Gary at the mercy of the U.S. courts would be 'disproportionate, unnecessary and unconscionable'.

    Last night, a Home Office spokesman said: 'The Home Secretary has maintained throughout the proceedings that he has no general discretion to refuse extradition. At this stage in the case the sole issue is whether extradition would, or would not, breach Mr McKinnon's human rights.

    'Unless the evidence shows that extradition would breach the European Convention on Human Rights it would be unlawful to refuse extradition.'
    Jyoti Ballabh, Nov 26, 2009
    #10
  11. Suppurating Tool

    Jyoti Ballabh

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    This is as absurd as it gets. Following this report Reuters came up with an exhaustive report on the whole intricacies of the British Legal system but somehow that is not available in the United States. If any British reader gets access to the tabloid please post it here or send it to me.

    This was published in the Daily Mail on November 13th, 2009 and I am pretty sure that Reuters covered that article on 16th or 17th.

    Thanks.
    Jyoti Ballabh, Nov 26, 2009
    #11
  12. Suppurating Tool

    schultzeecs

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    This brings us to an age old analogy- If you can't do the time, then don't to the ****ing crime.
    schultzeecs, Nov 29, 2009
    #12
  13. Suppurating Tool

    schultzeecs

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    New York Times Best selling author Jyoti Ballabh and his wife Dr. Jasmine Kamboj reached a deal with the Amazon.com to launch the version of Jyoti's magnum opus "Emancipation of my Heart" for Amazon's kindle e-book reader version. The announcement was made last Wednesday at the Barnes and Nobles bookstore on 82nd and Broadway in New York by the representative of the Penguin books.
    schultzeecs, Jun 10, 2010
    #13
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