manual lenses on D70

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ben Thomas, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Hi all,

    If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus indicator
    (inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in focus?

    Thanks.

    --
    Ben Thomas
     
    Ben Thomas, Mar 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. Ben Thomas

    Jim Guest

    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus indicator
    > (inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in focus?

    Yes provided it is an AI or AI-S lens.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Mar 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Hi all,
    >>
    >>If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus indicator
    >>(inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in focus?

    >
    > Yes provided it is an AI or AI-S lens.
    > Jim
    >
    >


    Thanks Jim. Widens the selection a bit.

    The question now is, what is a good AI manual focus lens similar to the AF
    80-200 2.8 ED? I'm basically trying to find a cheaper lens that will be just as
    fast and sharp. I will buy second hand.

    --
    Ben Thomas
     
    Ben Thomas, Mar 15, 2005
    #3
  4. Ben Thomas <> writes:

    > If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus
    > indicator (inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in
    > focus?


    Generally, yes. Possibly with a slow enough lens it won't; but the
    manual lenses I use on my Fuji S2 (same rules on which lenses meter
    and all, though) are the *fast* ones, so I haven't tested that.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 16, 2005
    #4
  5. Ben Thomas

    Sheldon Guest

    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Jim wrote:
    >> "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>Hi all,
    >>>
    >>>If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus indicator
    >>>(inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in focus?

    >>
    >> Yes provided it is an AI or AI-S lens.
    >> Jim
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Thanks Jim. Widens the selection a bit.
    >
    > The question now is, what is a good AI manual focus lens similar to the AF
    > 80-200 2.8 ED? I'm basically trying to find a cheaper lens that will be
    > just as fast and sharp. I will buy second hand.


    The AI 80-200 4.5 is a true classic that still gets good reviews. Not as
    fast as you want, but it has one ring for focus and zoom and is still a
    great lens. Most are in pretty good shape, and didn't fall apart like the
    off-brand copies.
    >
    > --
    > Ben Thomas
     
    Sheldon, Mar 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Ben Thomas

    Jim Guest

    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Jim wrote:
    > > "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>Hi all,
    > >>
    > >>If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus

    indicator
    > >>(inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in focus?

    > >
    > > Yes provided it is an AI or AI-S lens.
    > > Jim
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Thanks Jim. Widens the selection a bit.
    >
    > The question now is, what is a good AI manual focus lens similar to the AF
    > 80-200 2.8 ED? I'm basically trying to find a cheaper lens that will be

    just as
    > fast and sharp. I will buy second hand.

    That would be the AI-S version of the lens. However, before going out to
    spend money, be aware of the limitations of the D70 with respect to non-AF
    lenses. While it is correct that the electronic rangefinder works, the D70
    will not get exposure information. This can result in extreme frustration.

    Jim
    >
    > --
    > Ben Thomas
     
    Jim, Mar 16, 2005
    #6
  7. Ben Thomas

    [BnH] Guest

    Ben .. is your vision stil 60-60 ? :)
    Knowing that you are a software engineer , its quite rare that you can get
    60-60 vision, esp with the tiny viewfinder that D70 has ...
    I really advise you to go down and buy an AF lens .. and let the CPU focus
    for you.

    A friend of mine uses F4 .. and that's fine for him to use MF lenses [large
    viewfinder] .... but when he tried an F80 ..
    he immediately gives up and put AF lens on.


    =bob=


    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus indicator
    > (inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in focus?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > --
    > Ben Thomas
     
    [BnH], Mar 16, 2005
    #7
  8. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    [BnH] wrote:
    > Ben .. is your vision stil 60-60 ? :)
    > Knowing that you are a software engineer , its quite rare that you can get
    > 60-60 vision, esp with the tiny viewfinder that D70 has ...
    > I really advise you to go down and buy an AF lens .. and let the CPU focus
    > for you.
    >
    > A friend of mine uses F4 .. and that's fine for him to use MF lenses [large
    > viewfinder] .... but when he tried an F80 ..
    > he immediately gives up and put AF lens on.


    Thanks for the advice. I don't think 60/60 vision is required to see the
    in-focus indicator light up though. :)

    --
    Ben Thomas
     
    Ben Thomas, Mar 16, 2005
    #8
  9. Ben Thomas

    [BnH] Guest

    ok .. up to you mate.
    I am saying that because I had a few prime MF lens ... then when I was using
    it on my D1h ...
    I think .. "ok .. I give up .. " as to get the In-Focus to lit up .. is much
    slower compared when you are
    using a MF camera ie FM3A .... manual focusing is much fun in those cam :)

    But I am still eyeing on the MF 600mm f/ 5.6 up in eBAY now .. I think its a
    good lens to shot the moon n some wildlife.
    Ken Rockwell said his was re-sell at USD 2k back in 2003 .. I wonder what
    it'll fetch now.

    =bob=



    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > [BnH] wrote:


    >
    > Thanks for the advice. I don't think 60/60 vision is required to see the
    > in-focus indicator light up though. :)
    >
    > --
    > Ben Thomas
     
    [BnH], Mar 16, 2005
    #9
  10. Ben Thomas

    Guest

    In rec.photo.digital Jim <> wrote:
    : That would be the AI-S version of the lens. However, before going out to
    : spend money, be aware of the limitations of the D70 with respect to non-AF
    : lenses. While it is correct that the electronic rangefinder works, the D70
    : will not get exposure information. This can result in extreme frustration.

    I've got a friend looking into a Nikon DSLR, so I'd done some research for
    him. Apparently one can convert just about *any* of the ancient Nikon lenses to work,
    but unless it's AI it won't meter... do I have that correct? My question is what are
    the technical reasons why it won't meter? I can understand that it may not know the
    min/max aperture ranges on the lens without the right communication in the mount. Is
    there some reason why stop-down metering can't be done? (like the Pentax DSLRs with
    non-A lenses... )

    -Cory

    --

    *************************************************************************
    * Cory Papenfuss *
    * Electrical Engineering candidate Ph.D. graduate student *
    * Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University *
    *************************************************************************
     
    , Mar 16, 2005
    #10
  11. Ben Thomas

    Jim Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:d196tg$dr8$...
    > In rec.photo.digital Jim <> wrote:
    > : That would be the AI-S version of the lens. However, before going out

    to
    > : spend money, be aware of the limitations of the D70 with respect to

    non-AF
    > : lenses. While it is correct that the electronic rangefinder works, the

    D70
    > : will not get exposure information. This can result in extreme

    frustration.
    >
    > I've got a friend looking into a Nikon DSLR, so I'd done some research for
    > him. Apparently one can convert just about *any* of the ancient Nikon

    lenses to work,
    > but unless it's AI it won't meter... do I have that correct? My question

    is what are
    > the technical reasons why it won't meter? I can understand that it may

    not know the
    > min/max aperture ranges on the lens without the right communication in the

    mount. Is
    > there some reason why stop-down metering can't be done? (like the Pentax

    DSLRs with
    > non-A lenses... )

    Pre AI lenses which have not been converted (AI'd) can't be mounted without
    doing serious damage to the camera, the lens, or both... As for exposure,
    it looks to me like Nikon left out the electronics (from the D70) to perform
    the task.
    Most N series cameras can't do much with the pre-AI lenses either (for the
    same reason). The F3 and the F4 can use stop down metering with these
    lenses.

    Jim
     
    Jim, Mar 16, 2005
    #11
  12. Ben Thomas

    Jim Guest

    I said:
    > Pre AI lenses which have not been converted (AI'd) can't be mounted

    without
    > doing serious damage to the camera, the lens, or both... As for exposure,
    > it looks to me like Nikon left out the electronics (from the D70) to

    perform
    > the task.

    I noticed that the D70 does not have the aperature ring which is needed for
    exposure setting with AI and AI-S lenses. Therefore, it is mechanically
    impossible to perform automatic exposure with the D70 and these lenses. As
    the D70 does not have the ring, there can be no interference, thus I suppose
    that one could mount a pre-AI lens on it. Somebody else will have to try as
    I have no such lenses.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Mar 16, 2005
    #12
  13. Ben Thomas

    bob Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > I said:
    >
    >>Pre AI lenses which have not been converted (AI'd) can't be mounted

    >
    > without
    >
    >>doing serious damage to the camera, the lens, or both... As for exposure,
    >>it looks to me like Nikon left out the electronics (from the D70) to

    >
    > perform
    >
    >>the task.

    >
    > I noticed that the D70 does not have the aperature ring which is needed for
    > exposure setting with AI and AI-S lenses. Therefore, it is mechanically
    > impossible to perform automatic exposure with the D70 and these lenses. As
    > the D70 does not have the ring, there can be no interference, thus I suppose
    > that one could mount a pre-AI lens on it. Somebody else will have to try as
    > I have no such lenses.
    > Jim
    >
    >


    Yeah, but there's no excuse to disabling the meter -- the only reason
    for that is to sell new lenses.

    Bob
     
    bob, Mar 16, 2005
    #13
  14. Ben Thomas

    Jim Guest

    "bob" <> wrote in message
    news:pP0_d.51420$%...
    >
    > Yeah, but there's no excuse to disabling the meter -- the only reason
    > for that is to sell new lenses.
    >
    > Bob

    Not enabling the meter saves quite a few parts and quite an amount of
    programming. The camera can be sold for less which is extremely important
    these days.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Mar 16, 2005
    #14
  15. Ben Thomas

    Phil Cole Guest

    Ben Thomas wrote:

    > If I put an older manual lens on a Nikon D70, will the in-focus
    > indicator (inside the viewfinder) still come on when the subject is in
    > focus?


    Manual focus lenses do mount, however you get no metering whatsoever (i
    still don't understand why nikon didn't at least leave stop down
    aperture priority in - this should require any extra parts / costs).

    As for the comment about requiring 60/60 vision to manually focus, this
    isn't true. As with most AF cameras, the D70 uses a very bright
    focussing screen, which gives more depth of field. This makes it near
    impossible to tell if you have accurately focussed on something.

    As far as a lens suggestion goes, look out for a 70-210 AF or 70-210
    AF-D. These are the push pull type with a rotating front. Both are very
    fast, and apparently the D version has very good AF performance
    -http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/7021056.htm (i have the non-D
    version, which is quite nice)

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
    Phil Cole, Mar 21, 2005
    #15
  16. Ben Thomas

    Bubbabob Guest

    Phil Cole <> wrote:

    > As with most AF cameras, the D70 uses a very bright
    > focussing screen, which gives more depth of field.


    Whaaaat?
     
    Bubbabob, Mar 22, 2005
    #16
  17. Ben Thomas

    Darrell Guest

    "Bubbabob" <rnorton@_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote in message
    news:Xns96219AF649FB5dilfjelfoiwepofujsdk@216.168.3.30...
    > Phil Cole <> wrote:
    >
    > > As with most AF cameras, the D70 uses a very bright
    > > focussing screen, which gives more depth of field.

    >
    > Whaaaat?


    Odd my Pentax LX screen appears much brighter than my *ist D screen when I
    mount the same lenses. Hmmm DOF looks the same, maybe I have been wrong for
    36 years when I presumed the f:stop and focal length determined DOF...

    ;)
     
    Darrell, Mar 22, 2005
    #17
  18. Ben Thomas

    Phil Cole Guest

    Darrell wrote:

    >>>As with most AF cameras, the D70 uses a very bright
    >>>focussing screen, which gives more depth of field.

    >>
    >>Whaaaat?

    >
    > Odd my Pentax LX screen appears much brighter than my *ist D screen when I
    > mount the same lenses. Hmmm DOF looks the same, maybe I have been wrong for
    > 36 years when I presumed the f:stop and focal length determined DOF...


    Take a closer look, especially when making fine adjustments. Probably
    more accurately, as i should have put it, is that the *focussing
    screens* on older MF bodies have less DOF (which is basically the same
    as what i said, as long as you realise that i was just talking about the
    screen, not the lens). Having less depth of field makes it much easier
    to manually focus.

    Remember that the depth of field (what's considered "in focus") is
    largely depends on how much you're enlarging the image.

    Phil
     
    Phil Cole, Mar 23, 2005
    #18
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