Male Kitty

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Plato, Jul 27, 2006.

  1. Plato

    Plato Guest

    My daughter found a kitten on her boyfriends porch and brought it home.
    I insisted that she could only bring it home if it was a female but
    alas, it turned out to be a male. My question is:

    Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    work and sometimes not work.

    I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?
    Plato, Jul 27, 2006
    #1
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  2. Plato

    Frosty Guest

    On or about 26 Jul 2006 22:15:03 -0500, an entity identified as Plato
    <|@|.|> proudly proclaimed:

    >My daughter found a kitten on her boyfriends porch and brought it home.
    >I insisted that she could only bring it home if it was a female but
    >alas, it turned out to be a male. My question is:
    >
    >Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    >neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    >work and sometimes not work.
    >
    >I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    >cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?



    Denut the tom before puberty & he'll not spray.
    BTW, fixing a tom is SO much easier & cheaper than the other.
    Frosty, Jul 27, 2006
    #2
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  3. Frosty wrote:

    > BTW, fixing a tom is SO much easier & cheaper than the other.


    Sure is. You can DIY, if you have a friend to hold him down... :)


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Blinky the Shark, Jul 27, 2006
    #3
  4. Plato wrote:
    > My daughter found a kitten on her boyfriends porch and brought it
    > home. I insisted that she could only bring it home if it was a female
    > but alas, it turned out to be a male. My question is:
    >
    > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    > work and sometimes not work.
    >
    > I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    > cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?


    Do not fail to fix the cat.

    You will shorten his lifespan by quite a lot if you don't have him
    neutered, and if you keep him outside, without neutering him, you will
    have vet bills every time he gets into a fight.

    The operation, I believe, is best done around five months or so. If you
    have it done as soon as the vet says it's okay, the cat will never
    spray. If you don't, he's going to spray outside, on the house and
    anything else he deems his territory. You will therefore have cat piss
    to contend with no matter what, and it's no more pleasant on your car
    tires than it is on your sofa.

    It's very cheap to neuter a male, and you will be repaid many times over
    if you get it done.

    Finally, just so you're aware, spayed female cats also spray at times,
    just like unneutered males. So you're probably better off with the male
    anyway.

    --
    Rhonda Lea Kirk

    When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign,
    that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift
    Rhonda Lea Kirk, Jul 27, 2006
    #4
  5. Rhonda Lea Kirk wrote:

    > Do not fail to fix the cat.


    The cat is fine. Do no fail to *break* the cat. :)


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Blinky the Shark, Jul 27, 2006
    #5
  6. Plato

    Guest

    Blinky the Shark <> wrote:

    |>Frosty wrote:
    |>
    |>> BTW, fixing a tom is SO much easier & cheaper than the other.

    |>Sure is. You can DIY, if you have a friend to hold him down... :)

    Had a cat whose tail got caught in a door and was rotting.

    We gave it 10mg of Valium, which apparently has no effect on a cat.

    So while it was alert we chop'd the tail off with a meat cleaver. One
    holding and screaming thru the process (took two hacks).

    --
    XP on a USB pen drive
    http://tomshardware.co.uk/2005/09/09/windows_in_your_pocket/
    , Jul 27, 2006
    #6
  7. wrote:
    > Blinky the Shark <> wrote:
    >
    >|>Frosty wrote:
    >|>
    >|>> BTW, fixing a tom is SO much easier & cheaper than the other.
    >
    >|>Sure is. You can DIY, if you have a friend to hold him down... :)
    >
    > Had a cat whose tail got caught in a door and was rotting.
    >
    > We gave it 10mg of Valium, which apparently has no effect on a cat.
    >
    > So while it was alert we chop'd the tail off with a meat cleaver. One
    > holding and screaming thru the process (took two hacks).


    Know what the worst part is? "took two hacks". Yow. :)


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Blinky the Shark, Jul 27, 2006
    #7
  8. Blinky the Shark wrote:
    > Rhonda Lea Kirk wrote:
    >
    >> Do not fail to fix the cat.

    >
    > The cat is fine. Do no fail to *break* the cat. :)


    An unaltered male is not fine. Not by any stretch of the imagination.

    <gd&r>

    --
    Rhonda Lea Kirk

    Men are like cats.
    Can't live with 'em, and the pelt's too thin for a rug.
    Rhonda Lea Kirk, Jul 27, 2006
    #8
  9. Plato

    pcbutts1 Guest

    How would like it if somebody cut off your balls and you had no say-so what
    so ever, it's cruel. That said my husbands cat is neutered and it still
    tries to spray but nothing comes out, poor thing.

    --


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    "Plato" <|@|.|> wrote in message
    news:44c82f62$0$439$...
    > My daughter found a kitten on her boyfriends porch and brought it home.
    > I insisted that she could only bring it home if it was a female but
    > alas, it turned out to be a male. My question is:
    >
    > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    > work and sometimes not work.
    >
    > I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    > cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?
    >
    pcbutts1, Jul 27, 2006
    #9
  10. Plato

    Jimchip Guest

    On 2006-07-27, Plato <|@|.|> wrote:
    > My daughter found a kitten on her boyfriends porch and brought it home.
    > I insisted that she could only bring it home if it was a female but
    > alas, it turned out to be a male. My question is:
    > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    > work and sometimes not work.


    Neutering makes them...neuter. Cat's seem to piss wherever they damned
    well please but can be trained to use a litter box. The recommendation
    for a single cat is to have two litter boxes. For 2 cats one can get by
    with 3 litter boxes.

    Females would have to be neutered unless you like kittens or you really
    like the sounds they make when they're in heat. Female cats in heat
    sound just a little better than trolls whining because they have been
    binned.

    > I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    > cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?


    If you are taking custody of the cat then you should have it neutered.
    There are enough cat's in the world already and your Frisky shouldn't be
    out catting around making more. If Frisky is some "rare breed" then
    Frisky wouldn't be out at all.

    You should also make sure that Frisky has shots etc. If it's not worth
    the cost then you shouldn't own the pet. Other's might want Frisky so
    there are ways to adopt the cat away. A good initial check-up, shots and
    fixin' costs initially but all of that lasts along time and prevents
    more potentially costly problems.

    --
    "If you took everyone who's ever been to a Dead show, and lined them up,
    they'd stretch halfway to the moon and back...
    and none of them would be complaining."
    -- a local Deadhead in the Seattle Times
    Jimchip, Jul 27, 2006
    #10
  11. pcbutts1 wrote:
    > How would like it if somebody cut off your balls and you had no
    > say-so what so ever, it's cruel. That said my husbands cat is
    > neutered and it still tries to spray but nothing comes out, poor
    > thing.


    You're an idiot, and you know nothing about cats, so shut the **** up.


    --
    Rhonda Lea Kirk

    When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign,
    that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift
    Rhonda Lea Kirk, Jul 27, 2006
    #11
  12. Plato

    Dustin Guest

    Plato <|@|.|> wrote in news:44c82f62$0$439$:

    > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    > work and sometimes not work.


    Neutering is the best thing you can do for him if you intend to keep him
    and you don't want kittens. It's usually best to have it done around 5
    months old. Check with your vet to be sure, and do it when he recommends,
    he won't spray usually ever this way.

    > I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    > cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?


    It's very cheap and it helps to control the already overgrown cat
    population. :) It has longterm health benefits for the cat as well.


    --
    Dustin
    Author of BugHunter - MalWare Removal Tool
    http://bughunter.it-mate.co.uk
    Dustin, Jul 27, 2006
    #12
  13. Plato

    Plato Guest

    Mara wrote:
    >
    > Both my males are neutered and neither spray. Come to think of it, I've never


    Thanks for all the responses. Seems like visit to the doc is order.
    Plato, Jul 27, 2006
    #13
  14. Plato

    Plato Guest

    Dustin wrote:
    >


    Thanks to you and all else who wrote back.

    > > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    > > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    > > work and sometimes not work.

    >
    > Neutering is the best thing you can do for him if you intend to keep him
    > and you don't want kittens. It's usually best to have it done around 5
    > months old. Check with your vet to be sure, and do it when he recommends,
    > he won't spray usually ever this way.
    >
    > > I never had to get this done so I was wondering if it was worth the
    > > cost, or should the cat be kept outside 24/7?

    >
    > It's very cheap and it helps to control the already overgrown cat
    > population. :) It has longterm health benefits for the cat as well.
    Plato, Jul 27, 2006
    #14
  15. "Jimchip" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | On 2006-07-27, Plato <|@|.|> wrote:
    | > My daughter found a kitten on her boyfriends porch and brought it home.
    | > I insisted that she could only bring it home if it was a female but
    | > alas, it turned out to be a male. My question is:
    | > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    | > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    | > work and sometimes not work.

    A little off topic, but what the hell. ; )
    I can see why you came to helpdesk. There is no mention it HAS to be help
    for computers only. : )

    "Jimchip" wrote
    | Neutering makes them...neuter. Cat's seem to piss wherever they damned
    | well please but can be trained to use a litter box.

    I think he means neutering makes them neutral. A neutered male will be less
    likely to run away and spray. If you neuter them early enough in life, they
    won't even try. (I believe the proper age is somewhere close to 1 year old.
    A vet can help you to get a good approximation of age by looking at his
    teeth.) Some claim neutering makes them more docile. I disbelieve the last
    claim. One of my male cats has been neutered and still likes to play and run
    around the house. I guess it affects each individual cat differently.

    Actually litter training is very easy at any age.

    1. get a litter box

    2. fill it with some nice sand like clumping litter or shredded newspapers
    (newspaper requires getting used to the smell.)

    3. Wait. Don't force him. It is a good idea to show him where it is located
    (make sure you pick a good spot, moving it too much could confuse him).

    4. Do nothing while he uses the litter box, give him a treat after he
    finishes and a little praise. Kind of like potty training a child, except
    that cats tend to pick it up more quickly. After all, they naturally would
    rather go somewhere where they can bury their feces. The nice loose sand of
    kitty litter is perfect for them.

    5. A clean litter box is very important, clean it with a scoop at least once
    a day to encourage use. A neglected litter box is an unused litter box. You
    wouldn't want to scratch around in your own feces either.

    6. If he is urinating anywhere he pleases, use a spray bottle with water in
    it. Make sure you rinsed it out of whatever was previously in it before.
    Better yet, use a new one you can buy for a modest price at any garden
    center. Give him a squirt when ever you catch him IN THE ACT of urinating
    anywhere, except outdoors or in the litter box. This can be used for other
    behavioral modifications too. This is the 'carrot and stick' approach (with
    getting a little wet instead of hit with a stick.)

    NEVER squirt him after he has committed the crime and you have just
    discovered it. He could have done it a few minutes or hours ago. He will
    not realize what you are squirting him for and think that you are just being
    mean and try to stay away from you. Think of how a baby would feel. It's
    almost the same thing.

    "Jimchip" wrote
    | The recommendation
    | for a single cat is to have two litter boxes. For 2 cats one |can get by
    | with 3 litter boxes.

    3 litter boxes for two cats? Actually the recommendation from my vet is one
    litter box per cat. However, I have heard differing opinions on this
    subject. I have two cats and two litter boxes and clean them every morning
    using a litter scoop. I use a good odor absorbing litter that clumps when
    wet to get the urine out. (avoid crystals made from silica, somehow that
    doesn't sound safe for a cat to scratch around in.) After one week I dump
    all the litter in the garbage (it ruins compost, unfortunately. I have heard
    you can place it around your house or garden. It's supposed to keep mice and
    other feline prey from getting too close. Humans too, for that matter. LOL
    I don't recommend this practice because of the risk of toxoplasmosis.),
    Clean out the litter boxes using a little bit of bleach and soap, rinse
    well, dry and refill with fresh litter. This helps to prevent
    toxoplasmosis, a nasty bacteria that can be very serious to young children,
    pregnant or nursing women, and the elderly. It takes a week to develop into
    the infectious stage in the litter box. Cats carry the disease, but are not
    affected by it. It is excreted in their feces at one stage in the
    bacteria's life cycle. If you are a longtime or previous cat owner, you may
    have had toxoplasmosis at one time in your life and did not realize it. The
    symptoms are very flu like. If you have had it, (which is VERY likely for
    previous cat owners.) you have the anti-bodies for it and are immune.
    Except in the cases mentioned before. This is why they advise pregnant
    women and elderly to avoid cleaning out the litter box.

    "Jimchip" wrote
    | Females would have to be neutered unless you like kittens or you really

    It's really kind of hard to neuter a female anything. Actually its
    impossible to do so. ; )
    The word you were looking for was spayed. Females get spayed, Males get
    neutered. : )

    If you need assistance in paying for the operation, look to your local
    humane society or ASPCA (or something like it if you live in another
    country.) They sometimes offer a coupon you can use as a discount at
    participating veterinarians. You can also look for these coupons online.
    It's been awhile, so I don't remember exactly where I got them, but I saved
    about 45% off the price. Also consider yourself lucky. Males are much less
    expensive than females to get 'fixed'.

    To de-claw or not to de-claw? I don't agree with de-clawing at all, not
    only is it the most important defense a cat has, it is also a way they
    express pleasure. The do this by sort of kneading with their front paws.
    De-clawing is like you are cutting your fingers off back to the knuckle.
    OUCH!

    It will take awhile to train him, but it will happen. Just have patience,
    and above all else, love. Eventually, the scratching of furniture will stop
    or become a rare occurrence. Use a behavior modification method (like the
    spray bottle) and purchase or make a scratching post for him to use instead.
    (Try not to use staples or nails while putting on the carpet or rope. He
    could catch his nails on them and get stuck or hurt. Scratching will happen.
    You'll see.)

    If you believe him sensible enough to no longer scratch on furniture and he
    does anyway, this could indicate that he needs his nails trimmed. You can
    tell if he 'clicks' on a hard floor as well. Your vet should teach you
    proper nail trimming techniques. Use a scissor style clipper for cats, not
    the cigar cutter type. The latter is for dogs.

    Only feed your new kitty, 'Dry' cat food, the kind that comes in a bag. The
    canned food is called wet food and is much more expensive. The dry food is
    better for them, it encourages them to drink plenty of water. (You should
    always have a water bowl filled with fresh, clean water at least once a day.
    My cats 'demand' to have it refreshed once in the morning and once at
    night.)This helps avoid kidney,liver and Urinary Tract problems later in
    life that can lead to premature death or painful suffering that can only be
    stopped through euthanasia or 'putting them to sleep'.

    Purina is a good brand to use, they have a very good mix of the vitamins and
    minerals cats need. Start with 'Purina kitten chow', then once he is old
    enough (as indicated on the bag), switch to 'Cat Chow' or 'Natural Blends'
    (I think the latter is the best one, my cats do too.)

    As for keeping the cat outside. It is highly recommended to keep your new
    companion indoors. Indoor cats statistically live longer than outdoor cats.
    However, your cat may have other ideas. Here is a few tips I learned from
    the experience of having an (insistent) outdoor cat.

    1. I only recommend it in rural areas where traffic is light and he will
    have plenty of room to roam without the need to cross roads.
    2. Instead of letting him out at night, train him to only go out during the
    day. Naturally, cats are nocturnal but they can be easily trained to be
    diurnal. Night time is when cats are more likely to get injured from a
    fight with a predator, other cats, or hit by a car.
    3. Have a can of his favorite snack available. A dry but soft snack is
    recommended. When you want him to come in, shake the can as you call his
    name. When he finally does come in (could be awhile, so, have patience),
    give him a treat. You can train him this way so he will eventually come
    when you shake the can or call him.
    4. On days where it is extremely hot, avoid letting him out between 10 AM
    and 4 PM. This is the hottest part of the day. Make sure he has access to
    plenty of cool water. If he does seem like he is too hot or overheating,
    rub rubbing alcohol on the bottoms of his paws. This will help to cool him
    off. If he still doesn't seem to be feeling better get him to a vet. He
    could be in danger of a heat stroke, a common cause of death in household
    pets.
    5. In the wintertime when it is too cold. He probably won't want to go out
    anyway.

    Finally, get regular vet checkups and make sure all his shots are up to
    date.

    I hope these tips have helped.

    Have anymore questions about your new friend, you can email me at
    . I have had cats since I was a little boy. I have
    obtained quite a bit of knowledge on them and I am a member on the board of
    my local ASPCA. (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.)
    No, I am not a vegetarian or 'stop the slaughter' type. Leave that to PETA.
    Here is the ASPCA's web site and they can help answer your questions too.
    http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer



    --
    Happy Computing! :) (or catting?) LOL
    Randall Smith, Jul 27, 2006
    #15
  16. Plato

    Dan Evans Guest

    "Plato" <|@|.|> wrote in message
    news:44c82f62$0$439$...

    > Yes I know male cats are born to spray. In your experience does
    > neutering them take away the urge to spray or does neutering sometimes
    > work and sometimes not work.


    I've found that they don't spray after nuetering.

    Dan





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    Dan Evans, Jul 27, 2006
    #16
  17. Plato

    Dan Evans Guest

    "Randall Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:0KZxg.58111$...
    > Some claim neutering makes them more docile. I disbelieve the last
    > claim. One of my male cats has been neutered and still likes to play and
    > run
    > around the house. I guess it affects each individual cat differently.


    Docile in the sense they don't wander off for weeks at a time and get into
    fights.

    Dan





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    Dan Evans, Jul 27, 2006
    #17
  18. Plato

    Margolotta Guest

    On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 05:04:12 +0100, pcbutts1 wrote
    (in article <>):

    > How would like it if somebody cut off your balls and you had no say-so what
    > so ever, it's cruel. That said my husbands cat is neutered and it still
    > tries to spray but nothing comes out, poor thing.
    >
    >


    pcbutts is *FEMALE*?!?! I'd never have guessed. Or maybe it's gay...

    Anyway, so you'd never neuter or spay a cat. So you'd be able to find homes
    for the 2,000 or so kittens he could sire in his lifetime?

    If your husband's cat still attempts to spray then the operation wasn't done
    properly. A neutered tom won't attempt to spray because he won't feel the
    urge to.
    Margolotta, Jul 27, 2006
    #18
  19. "Dan Evans" <> wrote in message
    news:44c887ac$0$7164$...
    |
    | "Randall Smith" <> wrote in message
    | news:0KZxg.58111$...
    | > Some claim neutering makes them more docile. I disbelieve the last
    | > claim. One of my male cats has been neutered and still likes to play and
    | > run
    | > around the house. I guess it affects each individual cat differently.
    |
    | Docile in the sense they don't wander off for weeks at a time and get into
    | fights.
    |
    | Dan

    OOPS. You're right. My bad. Now I must open the back of my head and check
    my neural network to see why I didn't think of that. LOL : P
    Randall Smith, Jul 27, 2006
    #19
  20. Plato

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2006 23:56:15 -0400, Rhonda Lea Kirk wrote:

    > Blinky the Shark wrote:
    >> Rhonda Lea Kirk wrote:
    >>
    >>> Do not fail to fix the cat.

    >>
    >> The cat is fine. Do no fail to *break* the cat. :)

    >
    > An unaltered male is not fine. Not by any stretch of the imagination.
    >


    Oh hell no, those things piss all over the place. We adopted a male kitty
    from a shelter for my son and I made damn sure the thing had all it's
    shots and was neutered.

    --
    COOSN-266-06-25794

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    Meat Plow, Jul 27, 2006
    #20
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