Making Sense of Cisco Spare Parts

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Will, Apr 11, 2007.

  1. Will

    Will Guest

    I'm trying to make sense of Cisco's part number system that uses an equal
    (=) at the end of some part numbers, and it doesn't make a whole lot of
    sense to me so far. Some of the cases that are throwing me for a loop:

    - I have a catalog that has parts with = and no corresponding part without
    the equal. Case in point: 15216-AD1-2-30.3= I see as a spare but cannot
    locate in the catalog a 15216-AD1-2-30.3. What is the meaning of such
    cases?

    - I see cases where the = part has a lower price than the part without the
    equal. Example: 15808-CMP and 15808-CMP=. 15808-CMP is more expensive
    by far.

    I understand the cases where the = part has a higher price, primarily for
    service contracts (which makes sense), and for other items that are
    discounted at time of purchase with a system.

    --
    Will
     
    Will, Apr 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. Will,

    I think part numbers without "=" available only when you "build" the system.
    For example, you build Catalyst 6513 with Sup720, line cards,etc. Or, for
    example, if you order NetFlow cards for Catalyst 4500/Sup5 as "part of the
    deal", or afterwards. These parts are "part of the package". however if you
    want to "add" some auxiliary functionality or redundancy, you have to use
    "spare" parts. It's like having Lego "set" and "spare" pieces. But honestly,
    in most cases there is no difference in pricing, quality or availability
    between "spare" and "non-spare" parts.

    Good luck,

    Mike
    CCNP, CCDP, CCSP, Cisco Voice, MCSE W2K, MCSE+I, Security+, etc.
    CCIE R&S (in progress), CCIE Voice (in progress)
    ------
    Headset Adapters for Cisco IP Phones
    www.ciscoheadsetadapter.com
    www.headsetadapter.com



    "Will" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm trying to make sense of Cisco's part number system that uses an equal
    > (=) at the end of some part numbers, and it doesn't make a whole lot of
    > sense to me so far. Some of the cases that are throwing me for a loop:
    >
    > - I have a catalog that has parts with = and no corresponding part without
    > the equal. Case in point: 15216-AD1-2-30.3= I see as a spare but cannot
    > locate in the catalog a 15216-AD1-2-30.3. What is the meaning of such
    > cases?
    >
    > - I see cases where the = part has a lower price than the part without the
    > equal. Example: 15808-CMP and 15808-CMP=. 15808-CMP is more
    > expensive by far.
    >
    > I understand the cases where the = part has a higher price, primarily for
    > service contracts (which makes sense), and for other items that are
    > discounted at time of purchase with a system.
    >
    > --
    > Will
    >
     
    headsetadapter.com, Apr 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. Will

    Guest

    On 11 Apr, 12:07, "headsetadapter.com" <> wrote:
    > Will,
    >
    > I think part numbers without "=" available only when you "build" the system.
    > For example, you build Catalyst 6513 with Sup720, line cards,etc. Or, for
    > example, if you order NetFlow cards for Catalyst 4500/Sup5 as "part of the
    > deal", or afterwards. These parts are "part of the package". however if you
    > want to "add" some auxiliary functionality or redundancy, you have to use
    > "spare" parts. It's like having Lego "set" and "spare" pieces. But honestly,
    > in most cases there is no difference in pricing, quality or availability
    > between "spare" and "non-spare" parts.
    >
    > Good luck,
    >
    > Mike
    > CCNP, CCDP, CCSP, Cisco Voice, MCSE W2K, MCSE+I, Security+, etc.
    > CCIE R&S (in progress), CCIE Voice (in progress)
    > ------
    > Headset Adapters for Cisco IP Phoneswww.ciscoheadsetadapter.comwww.headsetadapter.com
    >
    > "Will" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > I'm trying to make sense of Cisco's part number system that uses an equal
    > > (=) at the end of some part numbers, and it doesn't make a whole lot of
    > > sense to me so far. Some of the cases that are throwing me for a loop:

    >
    > > - I have a catalog that has parts with = and no corresponding part without
    > > the equal. Case in point: 15216-AD1-2-30.3= I see as a spare but cannot
    > > locate in the catalog a 15216-AD1-2-30.3. What is the meaning of such
    > > cases?

    >
    > > - I see cases where the = part has a lower price than the part without the
    > > equal. Example: 15808-CMP and 15808-CMP=. 15808-CMP is more
    > > expensive by far.

    >
    > > I understand the cases where the = part has a higher price, primarily for
    > > service contracts (which makes sense), and for other items that are
    > > discounted at time of purchase with a system.

    >


    When I worked for a Cisco Partner components ordered without the "="
    were as has been said assumed to comprise an assembly and we checked
    carefully that the components did indeed fit together and interoperate
    and that the correct software was specified.

    Parts ordered with "=" were on the other hand assumed to be discrete
    and no shuch checks were made. IIRC the Cisco ordering system
    did some automatic checking too.

    There was never any price difference at all. That was though a while
    back.

    As an example an order for a 6513 chassis, PSU, sup720,
    fan tray, software and 11 Dual fabric line cards would hopefully
    be flagged up as invalid unless ordered with "=" part numbers.
     
    , Apr 11, 2007
    #3
  4. Will

    Will Guest

    "headsetadapter.com" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I think part numbers without "=" available only when you "build" the
    > system. For example, you build Catalyst 6513 with Sup720, line cards,etc.
    > Or, for example, if you order NetFlow cards for Catalyst 4500/Sup5 as
    > "part of the deal", or afterwards. These parts are "part of the package".
    > however if you want to "add" some auxiliary functionality or redundancy,
    > you have to use "spare" parts. It's like having Lego "set" and "spare"
    > pieces. But honestly, in most cases there is no difference in pricing,
    > quality or availability between "spare" and "non-spare" parts.


    All clear, but I'm still trying to make sense of the special cases I found
    such as:


    >> - I have a catalog that has parts with = and no corresponding part
    >> without the equal. Case in point: 15216-AD1-2-30.3= I see as a spare
    >> but cannot locate in the catalog a 15216-AD1-2-30.3. What is the
    >> meaning of such cases?
    >>
    >> - I see cases where the = part has a lower price than the part without
    >> the equal. Example: 15808-CMP and 15808-CMP=. 15808-CMP is more
    >> expensive by far.



    --
    Will
     
    Will, Apr 11, 2007
    #4
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