Mail delivery time calculator

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by zvnteq7, Mar 2, 2009.

  1. zvnteq7

    zvnteq7 Guest

    Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to another?

    Thanks
     
    zvnteq7, Mar 2, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. zvnteq7

    VanguardLH Guest

    zvnteq7 wrote:

    > Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    > long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to another?
    >
    > Thanks


    That would be impossible. There could be 2 hops between states in the
    route for your e-mail or there could be a dozen with each adding more
    delay. Some hops are slower than others and vary depending on their
    current load. A node in the route between hosts could be dead or
    unresponsive and it could be hours or days before it gets fixed. A mail
    server could be busy and refuse to accept further mail sessions and the
    sending mail server will have to retry later. There are no "central"
    mail servers in each state that each e-mail service provider (ESP) uses.
    They each operate their own mail server program on their own hosts on
    their own network over various local and backbone network providers.
    The Internet is a *mesh* network (and sometimes a mess network).

    Networks don't have a concept of geograhical "states". That's why it's
    called the WORLD Wide Web, not the Nebraska Wide Web, Madagascar Wide
    Web, Zanzibar Wide Web, Signapore Wide Web, Guam Wide Web, and so on.

    If you want to find out how long it took for a particular e-mail to
    arrive, look at the Received headers. They are prepended to the e-mail
    by each mail host, so the last mail host's Received header (for the
    recipient) will be at the top of the headers and the first mail host
    (for the sender) will be at the bottom. Just look at the timestamps in
    the first and last Received headers, but make sure to accommodate for
    timezone differences. Easiest is just to subtract the timezone offset
    (to equate to GMT) from the timestamps and then compute an absolute
    difference in the GMT-based timestamps.

    If your mail host's Received header said it accepted your e-mail at
    12:10:05 -0600 and the recipient's Received header said it got your
    e-mail at 10:12:15 -0800 then it took 2 minutes 10 seconds to deliver
    your e-mail:

    GMT = timestamp - timezoneOffset

    (12:10:05) - (-0600) = 18:10:05 GMT
    (10:12:15) - (-0800) = 18:12:15 GMT
    ========
    Difference = 00:02:10

    If you want to see how long YOUR e-mails are taking for delivery when
    using whatever is your ESP to the same or variable list of recipients,
    you'll have to compile that list yourself in a spreadsheet. However,
    since routes change, hops in the route vary in responsiveness, servers
    get busy or idle, maintenance happens, various network segments get busy
    or idle depending on the current load on them, and other variables,
    you'll probably see a lot of your e-mails take a few seconds while some
    take hours with a large discrepancy between the two extremes (i.e.,
    delivery will be really short or really long and not much in between).
     
    VanguardLH, Mar 2, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "VanguardLH" <> wrote in message
    news:gohjnl$k3$...
    > zvnteq7 wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    >> long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to another?
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > That would be impossible. There could be 2 hops between states in the
    > route for your e-mail or there could be a dozen with each adding more
    > delay. Some hops are slower than others and vary depending on their
    > current load. A node in the route between hosts could be dead or
    > unresponsive and it could be hours or days before it gets fixed. A mail
    > server could be busy and refuse to accept further mail sessions and the
    > sending mail server will have to retry later. There are no "central"
    > mail servers in each state that each e-mail service provider (ESP) uses.
    > They each operate their own mail server program on their own hosts on
    > their own network over various local and backbone network providers.
    > The Internet is a *mesh* network (and sometimes a mess network).
    >
    > Networks don't have a concept of geograhical "states". That's why it's
    > called the WORLD Wide Web, not the Nebraska Wide Web, Madagascar Wide
    > Web, Zanzibar Wide Web, Signapore Wide Web, Guam Wide Web, and so on.
    >
    > If you want to find out how long it took for a particular e-mail to
    > arrive, look at the Received headers. They are prepended to the e-mail
    > by each mail host, so the last mail host's Received header (for the
    > recipient) will be at the top of the headers and the first mail host
    > (for the sender) will be at the bottom. Just look at the timestamps in
    > the first and last Received headers, but make sure to accommodate for
    > timezone differences. Easiest is just to subtract the timezone offset
    > (to equate to GMT) from the timestamps and then compute an absolute
    > difference in the GMT-based timestamps.
    >
    > If your mail host's Received header said it accepted your e-mail at
    > 12:10:05 -0600 and the recipient's Received header said it got your
    > e-mail at 10:12:15 -0800 then it took 2 minutes 10 seconds to deliver
    > your e-mail:
    >
    > GMT = timestamp - timezoneOffset
    >
    > (12:10:05) - (-0600) = 18:10:05 GMT
    > (10:12:15) - (-0800) = 18:12:15 GMT
    > ========
    > Difference = 00:02:10
    >
    > If you want to see how long YOUR e-mails are taking for delivery when
    > using whatever is your ESP to the same or variable list of recipients,
    > you'll have to compile that list yourself in a spreadsheet. However,
    > since routes change, hops in the route vary in responsiveness, servers
    > get busy or idle, maintenance happens, various network segments get busy
    > or idle depending on the current load on them, and other variables,
    > you'll probably see a lot of your e-mails take a few seconds while some
    > take hours with a large discrepancy between the two extremes (i.e.,
    > delivery will be really short or really long and not much in between).


    Very detailed and erudite answer...to the wrong question. Reread OP ;-)
     
    Charlie Darwin, Mar 2, 2009
    #3
  4. zvnteq7

    zvnteq7 Guest

    Charlie Darwin wrote:
    > "VanguardLH" <> wrote in message
    > news:gohjnl$k3$...
    >> zvnteq7 wrote:
    >><snip>



    > Very detailed and erudite answer...to the wrong question. Reread OP ;-)


    You're right, I meant U.S. Postal Service Mail
     
    zvnteq7, Mar 2, 2009
    #4
  5. zvnteq7

    VanguardLH Guest

    Charlie Darwin wrote:

    > "VanguardLH" <> wrote in message
    > news:gohjnl$k3$...
    >> zvnteq7 wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    >>> long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to another?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> That would be impossible. There could be 2 hops between states in the
    >> route for your e-mail or there could be a dozen with each adding more
    >> delay. Some hops are slower than others and vary depending on their
    >> current load. A node in the route between hosts could be dead or
    >> unresponsive and it could be hours or days before it gets fixed. A mail
    >> server could be busy and refuse to accept further mail sessions and the
    >> sending mail server will have to retry later. There are no "central"
    >> mail servers in each state that each e-mail service provider (ESP) uses.
    >> They each operate their own mail server program on their own hosts on
    >> their own network over various local and backbone network providers.
    >> The Internet is a *mesh* network (and sometimes a mess network).
    >>
    >> Networks don't have a concept of geograhical "states". That's why it's
    >> called the WORLD Wide Web, not the Nebraska Wide Web, Madagascar Wide
    >> Web, Zanzibar Wide Web, Signapore Wide Web, Guam Wide Web, and so on.
    >>
    >> If you want to find out how long it took for a particular e-mail to
    >> arrive, look at the Received headers. They are prepended to the e-mail
    >> by each mail host, so the last mail host's Received header (for the
    >> recipient) will be at the top of the headers and the first mail host
    >> (for the sender) will be at the bottom. Just look at the timestamps in
    >> the first and last Received headers, but make sure to accommodate for
    >> timezone differences. Easiest is just to subtract the timezone offset
    >> (to equate to GMT) from the timestamps and then compute an absolute
    >> difference in the GMT-based timestamps.
    >>
    >> If your mail host's Received header said it accepted your e-mail at
    >> 12:10:05 -0600 and the recipient's Received header said it got your
    >> e-mail at 10:12:15 -0800 then it took 2 minutes 10 seconds to deliver
    >> your e-mail:
    >>
    >> GMT = timestamp - timezoneOffset
    >>
    >> (12:10:05) - (-0600) = 18:10:05 GMT
    >> (10:12:15) - (-0800) = 18:12:15 GMT
    >> ========
    >> Difference = 00:02:10
    >>
    >> If you want to see how long YOUR e-mails are taking for delivery when
    >> using whatever is your ESP to the same or variable list of recipients,
    >> you'll have to compile that list yourself in a spreadsheet. However,
    >> since routes change, hops in the route vary in responsiveness, servers
    >> get busy or idle, maintenance happens, various network segments get busy
    >> or idle depending on the current load on them, and other variables,
    >> you'll probably see a lot of your e-mails take a few seconds while some
    >> take hours with a large discrepancy between the two extremes (i.e.,
    >> delivery will be really short or really long and not much in between).

    >
    > Very detailed and erudite answer...to the wrong question. Reread OP ;-)


    "regular letter"

    Considering the prevalence of e-mail, especially for the audience that
    visits here to read that post, do you think "letter" meant postal mail
    or an e-mail? My guess was e-mail.

    If the OP actually meant a postal mailing, and because he is in the USA,
    then he could check at usps.com. Their estimates are the only ones that
    matter because they're the one handling that postal mail.

    Of course, the OP might've been sending the "letter" in a FedEx envelope
    and so obviously it would be FedEx that you get that info.
     
    VanguardLH, Mar 2, 2009
    #5
  6. zvnteq7

    VanguardLH Guest

    zvnteq7 wrote:

    > Charlie Darwin wrote:
    >> "VanguardLH" <> wrote in message
    >> news:gohjnl$k3$...
    >>> zvnteq7 wrote:
    >>><snip>

    >
    >> Very detailed and erudite answer...to the wrong question. Reread OP ;-)

    >
    > You're right, I meant U.S. Postal Service Mail


    Then go to usps.com to find out what they say for delivery time based on
    WHICH delivery mode you pay for.

    Express Mail
    Priority Mail
    First-class Mail
    Bulk Mail

    Use their "Calculate Postage" wizard to walk through an example scenario
    of whatever type of mailing you intend to track. Based on your
    selections and the start/end locations, they'll tell you an expected
    range for delivery time (you'll see a Speed column when you get to
    choose which service to use based on your prior selections [to determine
    which services are available for your particular package]).

    Since USPS uses truck, train, and airplane to move the postal mail
    items, and until you pick a class of service that can dictate speed of
    delivery, how long it takes depends on your choices and what you send.
     
    VanguardLH, Mar 2, 2009
    #6
  7. zvnteq7

    G. Morgan Guest

    VanguardLH wrote:

    >"regular letter"
    >
    >Considering the prevalence of e-mail, especially for the audience that
    >visits here to read that post, do you think "letter" meant postal mail
    >or an e-mail? My guess was e-mail.
    >
    >If the OP actually meant a postal mailing, and because he is in the USA,
    >then he could check at usps.com. Their estimates are the only ones that
    >matter because they're the one handling that postal mail.
    >
    >Of course, the OP might've been sending the "letter" in a FedEx envelope
    >and so obviously it would be FedEx that you get that info.


    Does it hurt?
     
    G. Morgan, Mar 2, 2009
    #7
  8. zvnteq7

    VanguardLH Guest

    nobody > wrote:

    > VanguardLH wrote:
    >> zvnteq7 wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    >>> long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to another?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> That would be impossible. There could be 2 hops between states in the
    >> route for your e-mail

    > ^^^^^^
    >
    > 8< snippage >8
    >
    > Dude, the OP was talking about SNAILMAIL


    I didn't figure the OP was so stupid as to not realize that the postal
    service provider that he uses would be from where he gets the delivery
    times. However, many users don't know about reading the Received
    headers in e-mail. E-mail and mail are now used interchangeably. So
    why not letter and message? Then consider the venue in which the OP
    asked the question.

    Oh, I forgot. You're God.
     
    VanguardLH, Mar 3, 2009
    #8
  9. zvnteq7

    Me Guest

    "Bill" <> wrote in message
    news:MPG.24162359fb394b50989687@localhost...
    > In article <gohjnl$k3$>, says...
    >>
    >> zvnteq7 wrote:
    >>
    >> > Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    >> > long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to
    >> > another?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks

    >>
    >> That would be impossible. There could be 2 hops between states in the
    >> route for your e-mail or there could be a dozen with each adding more
    >> delay. Some hops are slower than others and vary depending on their
    >> current load.

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > When I read the original post I thought the OP was talking about snail
    > mail.
    >
    > Bill


    Me too because he mentioned the mail being delivered between states. Why
    would that have anything to do with email?
     
    Me, Mar 3, 2009
    #9
  10. zvnteq7

    Mike Easter Guest

    zvnteq7 wrote:
    > Does anyone know of an online chart that gives a general idea of how
    > long it takes for one regular letter to travel from one state to
    > another?


    The variables in the equation are greater than the fixed points.

    That is, about a mile from my house is a huge regional postal center.
    Several states away there will be another regional postal center, which,
    like mine, also provides postal mailboxes.

    If you are measuring the time from posting at the/my postal center to
    delivery in a postal mailbox in some other state's postal center, the time
    will be markedly less than if you are counting the time for a mail carrier
    to pick up the mail from my residence, take it to the nearest carrier
    center from which it will later travel to a regional center and then later
    travel to the distant regional travel center to be distributed to a local
    postal facility where it will be dispensed to the mail carriers which will
    eventually deliver it to some other residence or business.

    The deadtimes at the 6 or more stops are much much greater than the travel
    time between states. If you eliminate most of the deadtimes by picking up
    and delivering at the regional centers, most of the delivery time lag is
    eliminated.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Mar 16, 2009
    #10
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Brian H¹©

    Mail Delivery failure

    Brian H¹©, Jul 3, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    562
    Gary G. Taylor
    Jul 5, 2003
  2. divoch

    Mail delivery error: return Mail User unknown

    divoch, Jan 2, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    1,559
    divoch
    Jan 6, 2004
  3. Mark
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    609
  4. Mick Cant

    Post delivery time fro UK to Philippines

    Mick Cant, May 26, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,374
  5. nod
    Replies:
    23
    Views:
    1,442
    Jonathan Walker
    Oct 24, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page