Macro pictures

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Geir R.Pettersson, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. Hi,
    I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.

    I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    electronic boards.
    I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the board,
    I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    for.
    If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?


    --
    Best Regards
    Geir R.Pettersson

    http://www.arctic-heating.com
    Geir R.Pettersson, Aug 26, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Geir R.Pettersson

    Charles Guest

    On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 08:39:22 +0200, "Geir R.Pettersson"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    >
    >I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    >electronic boards.
    >I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the board,
    >I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    >for.
    >If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?



    Care to expand on the requirements a bit?

    If you just want to take pictures of some printing on a board, lots of
    available options there. Maybe one of the older Nikons, 990,995, or
    their current replacements.

    If you need to have one photo of a board, say 12X12 inches, and be
    able to read small printing on that picture, I think you will need
    lots of pixels, one of the newer cameras with a good close-up lens.
    macro generally means that the image on the sensing device, film or
    ccd, is the same size as the object being photographed.


    --

    - Charles
    -
    -does not play well with others
    Charles, Aug 26, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Geir R.Pettersson

    Charles Guest

    On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 08:39:22 +0200, "Geir R.Pettersson"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    >
    >I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    >electronic boards.
    >I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the board,
    >I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    >for.
    >If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?



    Care to expand on the requirements a bit?

    If you just want to take pictures of some printing on a board, lots of
    available options there. Maybe one of the older Nikons, 990,995, or
    their current replacements.

    If you need to have one photo of a board, say 12X12 inches, and be
    able to read small printing on that picture, I think you will need
    lots of pixels, one of the newer cameras with a good close-up lens.
    macro generally means that the image on the sensing device, film or
    ccd, is the same size as the object being photographed.


    --

    - Charles
    -
    -does not play well with others
    Charles, Aug 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Thanks,

    Look at this link and see the pictures:
    http://akam.no/art.php?artikkelid=8994&side=10

    I want to take pictures with a digital camera, where I am able to see the
    smallest component and see if there is corrosion around the ic circuit. I
    need it for documentation for customers.
    I wonder if I should look for a camera with highest possible MP, or the one
    who say they have best macro function.

    --
    Best Regards
    Geir R.Pettersson

    http://www.arctic-heating.com
    "Charles" <> skrev i melding
    news:...
    > On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 08:39:22 +0200, "Geir R.Pettersson"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    > >
    > >I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    > >electronic boards.
    > >I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the

    board,
    > >I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall

    look
    > >for.
    > >If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?

    >
    >
    > Care to expand on the requirements a bit?
    >
    > If you just want to take pictures of some printing on a board, lots of
    > available options there. Maybe one of the older Nikons, 990,995, or
    > their current replacements.
    >
    > If you need to have one photo of a board, say 12X12 inches, and be
    > able to read small printing on that picture, I think you will need
    > lots of pixels, one of the newer cameras with a good close-up lens.
    > macro generally means that the image on the sensing device, film or
    > ccd, is the same size as the object being photographed.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > - Charles
    > -
    > -does not play well with others
    Geir R.Pettersson, Aug 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Thanks,

    Look at this link and see the pictures:
    http://akam.no/art.php?artikkelid=8994&side=10

    I want to take pictures with a digital camera, where I am able to see the
    smallest component and see if there is corrosion around the ic circuit. I
    need it for documentation for customers.
    I wonder if I should look for a camera with highest possible MP, or the one
    who say they have best macro function.

    --
    Best Regards
    Geir R.Pettersson

    http://www.arctic-heating.com
    "Charles" <> skrev i melding
    news:...
    > On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 08:39:22 +0200, "Geir R.Pettersson"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    > >
    > >I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    > >electronic boards.
    > >I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the

    board,
    > >I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall

    look
    > >for.
    > >If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?

    >
    >
    > Care to expand on the requirements a bit?
    >
    > If you just want to take pictures of some printing on a board, lots of
    > available options there. Maybe one of the older Nikons, 990,995, or
    > their current replacements.
    >
    > If you need to have one photo of a board, say 12X12 inches, and be
    > able to read small printing on that picture, I think you will need
    > lots of pixels, one of the newer cameras with a good close-up lens.
    > macro generally means that the image on the sensing device, film or
    > ccd, is the same size as the object being photographed.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > - Charles
    > -
    > -does not play well with others
    Geir R.Pettersson, Aug 26, 2004
    #5
  6. Geir R.Pettersson

    Colin D Guest

    "Geir R.Pettersson" wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    > I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    >
    > I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    > electronic boards.
    > I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the board,
    > I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    > for.
    > If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?
    >
    > --
    > Best Regards
    > Geir R.Pettersson
    >
    > http://www.arctic-heating.com


    There's more than one answer to your question, mainly depending on:
    a). the size of the board(s) you wish to photograph, e.g. computer
    mainboard size with many very small components, headers, and jumper pins
    labelled, or smaller and simpler boards with perhaps larger print.

    b). whether or not you require the photograph to be accurately linear,
    or whether some barrel or pincushion distortion in the image would be
    tolerable.

    c). The purpose for which the photograph will be used.

    Point (a) will determine the pixel count you will need. Small, simple
    boards could get away with 2 or 3 megapixels, mainboard size and detail
    would probably need up to 5 megapixels.

    Point (b) will dictate the lens type needed. Point-and-shoot cameras
    with zoom lenses typically focus very close, yielding full-frame images
    of small objects, but at close range inevitably show barrel or
    pincushion distortion of the image. If that is unacceptable, you will
    need a camera capable of mounting a true macro lens with flat field and
    no linear distortion, probably a digital single-lens reflex with a
    proper macro lens.

    Point(c) has some bearing on points(a) and (b). If the photograph is to
    be used as an in-house technical reference only, then relaxed limits for
    sharpness and distortion would be acceptable, so long as the image could
    be read by technicians. If it is for publication, a higher standard
    would be desirable, and if it is to be used as a pattern for taking
    measurements and manufacturing a new board, then dimensional accuracy
    will be needed.

    Good luck in making your choice.

    Colin D.
    Colin D, Aug 26, 2004
    #6
  7. Geir R.Pettersson

    YoYo Guest

    I do alot of Macro work and I saw the
    web site you showed.
    A Canon 10d or Digital Rebel with a
    Canon 100mm f/2.8 Macro will do better
    then the cameras on the web site.

    "Geir R.Pettersson"
    <> wrote in message
    news:cgk07c$4lo$...
    > Hi,
    > I new to this group, no experience

    with digital camera.
    >
    > I work with electronics, and sometimes

    we need to take pictures of
    > electronic boards.
    > I need to take close up pictures where

    you can read the print on the board,
    > I want to purchase a digital camera,

    but are not sure of what I shall look
    > for.
    > If I want to take macro pictures, what

    should I look for in a camera ?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Best Regards
    > Geir R.Pettersson
    >
    > http://www.arctic-heating.com
    >
    >
    YoYo, Aug 26, 2004
    #7
  8. Geir R.Pettersson wrote:
    > Hi,
    > I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    >
    > I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    > electronic boards.
    > I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the

    board,
    > I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    > for.
    > If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?



    If you are serious about this, you want just about any Digital SLR with
    a real Macro lens. Any of them will do much better than the tested cameras
    and do it easier. You will also want some dedicated lighting equipment and
    maybe a copy stand, or its equalivelent.

    Lighting, macro lens, staging.

    * Lighting is more an art than a science, but once you find out the type of
    lighting that works well for the results you want it should not need much
    adjustment. In general you will want light coming from two or more sides.
    One light on either side or a ring light on the lens should work. Then
    there is the question of hard or soft. I suggest trying both. Hard would
    be small source like bare bulb light, soft would be accomplished by the use
    of diffusion material either shining the light through the material (placed
    in front of the light source or as a tent over the subject, or reflecting
    the light off a large matt reflector.

    * Macro lens is important to be able to sharply focus on a small flat
    subject. The macro "mode" or macro "setting" on a do everything zoom lens
    just is not good enough for serious work.

    * Staging involves being able to support the subject, the lights and the
    camera along with any reflectors and diffusers, in a convenient manner.
    Copy stands usually work well.

    Good Luck.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 26, 2004
    #8
  9. Geir R.Pettersson

    HRosita Guest

    Hi,
    It really depends on how much you want to spend.
    In the non-DSLR field, the cameras with the best macr are the Nikon Coolpix.
    With the old 990 I could take a picture of a page from the phone book.
    Rosita
    HRosita, Aug 26, 2004
    #9
  10. Geir R.Pettersson

    Arty Facting Guest

    Wow Geir!

    I think you should be the one recommending to us!

    Arty

    "Geir R.Pettersson" <> wrote in message
    news:cgk07c$4lo$...
    > Hi,
    > I new to this group, no experience with digital camera.
    >
    > I work with electronics, and sometimes we need to take pictures of
    > electronic boards.
    > I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the

    board,
    > I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    > for.
    > If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Best Regards
    > Geir R.Pettersson
    >
    > http://www.arctic-heating.com
    >
    >
    Arty Facting, Aug 26, 2004
    #10
  11. Geir R.Pettersson

    Alan Meyer Guest

    "Geir R.Pettersson" <> wrote in message
    news:cgk07c$4lo$...
    ....
    > I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the

    board,
    > I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall look
    > for.
    > If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?


    I'll add a few things to what the others have said.
    I'm guessing that if you are photographing circuit boards
    you are _not_ taking extreme macros. By extreme macros
    I mean photographs taken from an inch or two away.
    Therefore most modern cameras will have the macro
    capability you need.

    Presumably, for minimum distortion, you'll want to shoot
    at a moderate telephoto setting. The "normal" and wide-angle
    perspectives may cause both image distortion and difficulty
    focussing in a close-up shot. The problems come
    because the far edge of the circuit board in a close-up will
    be further away from the lens than the center of the board.
    With a telephoto, the ratio of difference between center-to-lens
    and edge-to-lens will be lower. So you need a camera with
    some telephoto capability as well as macro capability.

    Obviously, you need a camera with a tripod socket.

    It would be handy to have a socket for a cable shutter release,
    though if you have a very stable tripod you may be able
    to trip the shutter on a long exposure without jarring the
    camera without a camera. Alternatively, a 2 second timer
    would also work well. Press the shutter release, remove
    your finger, and two seconds later the exposure is made with
    no human induced vibration. 10 second timers are fine too,
    but will slow you down more.

    You want manual control over exposure and flash. I'm
    sure you'll want to turn flash off, set the exposure for good
    depth of field, use your own lighting, and use a long
    exposure time (rather than a short time with a wider
    open lens that has less depth of field.)

    And you want lots of megapixels. My personal observation
    is that fine detail is improved by high megapixel counts. It
    is true that you have to multiply pixel count by 4 in order to
    halve the feature size on an image (a theoretical "doubling"
    of sharpness.) However, I believe the eye perceives even
    small increases in sharpness as very significant. Since this
    is a professional project and your customers may be evaluating
    your work based on the quality of the image they see, if your
    project can justify the cost, I'd go for at least 5 MP, and 6 or
    more is even better - especially if they'll ever view these images
    on a CRT screen, where they can see all the pixels, as opposed
    to small prints.

    Let us know what you finally decide.

    Alan
    Alan Meyer, Aug 26, 2004
    #11
  12. Alan Meyer wrote:
    > "Geir R.Pettersson" <> wrote in message
    > news:cgk07c$4lo$...
    > ...
    >> I need to take close up pictures where you can read the print on the

    board,
    >> I want to purchase a digital camera, but are not sure of what I shall

    look
    >> for.
    >> If I want to take macro pictures, what should I look for in a camera ?

    >
    > I'll add a few things to what the others have said.
    > I'm guessing that if you are photographing circuit boards
    > you are _not_ taking extreme macros. By extreme macros
    > I mean photographs taken from an inch or two away.
    > Therefore most modern cameras will have the macro
    > capability you need.


    While you are right that most cameras will be able to create images that
    can read the words on the boards, but the results will NOT be a good as
    could be obtained with a true macro lens. A true macro has been optimized
    for the close distance and most has a good flat field

    >
    > Presumably, for minimum distortion, you'll want to shoot
    > at a moderate telephoto setting. The "normal" and wide-angle
    > perspectives may cause both image distortion and difficulty
    > focussing in a close-up shot. The problems come
    > because the far edge of the circuit board in a close-up will
    > be further away from the lens than the center of the board.
    > With a telephoto, the ratio of difference between center-to-lens
    > and edge-to-lens will be lower. So you need a camera with
    > some telephoto capability as well as macro capability.


    That is a very good point and since I neglected to mention it. I am glad
    you pointed it out. on a digital SLR a lens between about 60-100 mm would
    be a good choice.

    >
    > Obviously, you need a camera with a tripod socket.
    >
    > It would be handy to have a socket for a cable shutter release,
    > though if you have a very stable tripod you may be able
    > to trip the shutter on a long exposure without jarring the
    > camera without a camera. Alternatively, a 2 second timer
    > would also work well. Press the shutter release, remove
    > your finger, and two seconds later the exposure is made with
    > no human induced vibration. 10 second timers are fine too,
    > but will slow you down more.
    >
    > You want manual control over exposure and flash. I'm
    > sure you'll want to turn flash off, set the exposure for good
    > depth of field, use your own lighting, and use a long
    > exposure time (rather than a short time with a wider
    > open lens that has less depth of field.)
    >
    > And you want lots of megapixels. My personal observation
    > is that fine detail is improved by high megapixel counts. It
    > is true that you have to multiply pixel count by 4 in order to
    > halve the feature size on an image (a theoretical "doubling"
    > of sharpness.) However, I believe the eye perceives even
    > small increases in sharpness as very significant. Since this
    > is a professional project and your customers may be evaluating
    > your work based on the quality of the image they see, if your
    > project can justify the cost, I'd go for at least 5 MP, and 6 or
    > more is even better - especially if they'll ever view these images
    > on a CRT screen, where they can see all the pixels, as opposed
    > to small prints.
    >
    > Let us know what you finally decide.


    All good useful comments.

    >
    > Alan


    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 27, 2004
    #12
  13. Geir R.Pettersson

    Pepe Guest

    Pepe, Aug 28, 2004
    #13
    1. Advertising

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