Macro or Telephoto?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mardon, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. Mardon

    Mardon Guest

    I've been using a Canon 180mm L macro and a Canon 70-200mm L f/2.8
    IS for about a year now. Despite this, I'm still not certain
    exactly how to choose which lens to use for cross-over sized
    subjects; for example, something like a small dog or cat. I know
    the macro is best at smaller aperture settings, yet both lens are
    quite good throughout their range. In practice, I generally use
    the macro for things located within 2 meters (6 feet) of the
    camera and the telephoto for anything located further away but I
    don't know if this is a reasonable way to make the decision.
    Comments?
     
    Mardon, Nov 27, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mardon wrote:
    > I've been using a Canon 180mm L macro and a Canon 70-200mm L f/2.8
    > IS for about a year now. Despite this, I'm still not certain
    > exactly how to choose which lens to use for cross-over sized
    > subjects; for example, something like a small dog or cat. I know
    > the macro is best at smaller aperture settings, yet both lens are
    > quite good throughout their range. In practice, I generally use
    > the macro for things located within 2 meters (6 feet) of the
    > camera and the telephoto for anything located further away but I
    > don't know if this is a reasonable way to make the decision.
    > Comments?


    Well you are really looking at apples and oranges.

    That "L" lens is a dandy. However for most subjects, like a small dog
    or cat, I would pick up the zoom. That zoom should perform great in any
    distance you are likely to be doing and you will have the advantage of the
    zoom, which is likely to be important with a cat or dog. Unless you
    photographing just an eye or something in that range, you don't really need
    the macro.

    Think in terms of subject size not distance. If it is three inches or
    less or it does not move, go with the 180, otherwise use the zoom.

    If you don't like that idea, feel free to use your own. I doubt if you
    are going to go wrong.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia 's Muire duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Nov 27, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mardon

    JimKramer Guest

    Mardon wrote:
    > I've been using a Canon 180mm L macro and a Canon 70-200mm L f/2.8
    > IS for about a year now. Despite this, I'm still not certain
    > exactly how to choose which lens to use for cross-over sized
    > subjects; for example, something like a small dog or cat. I know
    > the macro is best at smaller aperture settings, yet both lens are
    > quite good throughout their range. In practice, I generally use
    > the macro for things located within 2 meters (6 feet) of the
    > camera and the telephoto for anything located further away but I
    > don't know if this is a reasonable way to make the decision.
    > Comments?


    Which one will focus faster and let you get the shot? I know the
    answer :)

    If you really want to get closer with the 70-200 put a short (~12mm)
    extension tube on it.

    Jim
     
    JimKramer, Nov 27, 2006
    #3
  4. Mardon wrote:
    > I've been using a Canon 180mm L macro and a Canon 70-200mm L f/2.8
    > IS for about a year now. Despite this, I'm still not certain
    > exactly how to choose which lens to use for cross-over sized
    > subjects; for example, something like a small dog or cat. I know
    > the macro is best at smaller aperture settings, yet both lens are
    > quite good throughout their range. In practice, I generally use
    > the macro for things located within 2 meters (6 feet) of the
    > camera and the telephoto for anything located further away but I
    > don't know if this is a reasonable way to make the decision.
    > Comments?


    There is not a simple answer. It depends on what your desire is in the
    appearance for the final image. I do a lot of macro photography. I
    have definite objectives on the perspective of the image. I have a
    macro lens which is only macro in the telephoto position (max focal
    length). But when I do tabletop photography this does the normal
    telephoto thing of compressing depth. Yes, I know it is not the focal
    length itself that sets perspective, but the object distance that
    results from framing the objects with a long focal length.

    Anyway, since I want expanded depth for my tabletop work, I do not use
    the telephoto- I use a shorter lens and supplemental (plus) lenses for
    the close focus, since this gives me a better perspective. If you use
    short lenses you can make the cat look like a tiger or leopard, while
    the use of the telephoto lens will make it look relatively smaller.
    Your choice. Sort of like selecting the focal length you want to use
    for portraiture.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Nov 28, 2006
    #4
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