Lots of tv on dvd, almost too much!

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Evil, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. Evil

    Evil Guest

    well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    monthly now. Meanwhile, season 2's come out around 6months later?
    (Well, except for LITTLE HOUSE).

    Hell, in a couple/few years, i can see release dates being totally
    crammed with season boxes of tv series, so much that i'll actually
    have to think about what i can and can't buy! And i still haven't
    gotten around to getting the OUTER LIMIT sets. I'm saving for FREAKS
    AND GEEKS and awaiting NEWSRADIO, THREES COMPANY, SPOOKS, LARRY SANDER
    2 (is that every going to happen?), .... and i haven't grabbed
    SOPRANOS 4 yet. *sigh*

    the one saving grace (for me at least) is that tv shows have been
    mostly crap for a while so i'm not eagerly awaiting another DAWSONS
    CREEK or FELICITY or ALIAS dvdset, saving me a ton of cash.

    i suppose i can cancel my cable now :)
     
    Evil, Nov 3, 2003
    #1
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  2. Evil

    jayembee Guest

    (Evil) wrote:

    >well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    >section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    >side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    >monthly now.


    In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    >Hell, in a couple/few years, i can see release dates being totally
    >crammed with season boxes of tv series, so much that i'll actually
    >have to think about what i can and can't buy!


    But that's always the case, even with movies. It's all a matter of
    triage, where you get to decide what you can or can't live without.
    Or live without for the immediate future. Even if you decide that you
    can't get them now, if they exist, you might still be able to get them
    months or years down the road.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Nov 3, 2003
    #2
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  3. Evil

    Mark Spatny Guest

    jayembee, says...
    > The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.


    Here's a wild fact. According to a recent article in the Hollywood
    Reporter, the studios have discovered that for some shows, DVD sales
    bring in as much revenue as syndication. That's HUGE. It will totally
    change the way studios think about marketing, and financing, new series.
     
    Mark Spatny, Nov 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Evil

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, jayembee
    <> wrote:

    > (Evil) wrote:
    >
    > >well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    > >section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    > >side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    > >monthly now.

    >
    > In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    > DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.
    >

    Now the question becomes, will this hurt the large syndication market?

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
     
    Invid Fan, Nov 4, 2003
    #4
  5. Evil

    Rutgar Guest

    On 3 Nov 2003 13:30:39 -0800, (Evil) wrote:

    >well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    >section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    >side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    >monthly now. Meanwhile, season 2's come out around 6months later?
    >(Well, except for LITTLE HOUSE).
    >
    >Hell, in a couple/few years, i can see release dates being totally
    >crammed with season boxes of tv series, so much that i'll actually
    >have to think about what i can and can't buy! And i still haven't
    >gotten around to getting the OUTER LIMIT sets. I'm saving for FREAKS
    >AND GEEKS and awaiting NEWSRADIO, THREES COMPANY, SPOOKS, LARRY SANDER
    >2 (is that every going to happen?), .... and i haven't grabbed
    >SOPRANOS 4 yet. *sigh*
    >
    >the one saving grace (for me at least) is that tv shows have been
    >mostly crap for a while so i'm not eagerly awaiting another DAWSONS
    >CREEK or FELICITY or ALIAS dvdset, saving me a ton of cash.
    >
    >i suppose i can cancel my cable now :)


    I think it's great that so many TV series are coming out on DVD.
    But, like you, I'm falling behind. I have 7 season sets, that I
    haven't been able to watch yet.

    -Sex and the City #4
    -Sopranos #4
    -Xena #2
    -Simpsons #2
    -Babylon 5 #1 (I don't know if I'll ever finish this one. It's really
    not as good as I remembered).
    -Battlestar Galactica (complete) - well except for "Galactica 1980",
    which is probably a good thing.
    -Deep Space Nine (I'm currently only half way through DS-9 Season 5,
    and Season 6 comes out tomorrow)

    However, I'm not complaining.

    - Rutgar
     
    Rutgar, Nov 4, 2003
    #5
  6. Invid Fan wrote:

    >>In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    >>DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    >>believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    >>the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    >>willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    >
    > Now the question becomes, will this hurt the large syndication market?


    ....WHAT syndication market??

    Syndicated reruns went out with Nick at Nite--
    Ever since every local UHF station in the country was bought up by
    either Fox, UPN, or Pax, what few "Seinfeld" and "Frasier" reruns are
    still being sold nowadays are usually banished to the wee-hour airings
    if at all...

    No *wonder* studios have inextricably worked DVD into their post-network
    series budget plans.

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Nov 4, 2003
    #6
  7. "Invid Fan" <> wrote in message
    news:031120032000440236%...
    > In article <>, jayembee
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > (Evil) wrote:
    > >
    > > >well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    > > >section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    > > >side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    > > >monthly now.

    > >
    > > In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    > > DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > > believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > > the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > > willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.
    > >

    > Now the question becomes, will this hurt the large syndication market?


    That's their problem. They choose to be greedy and cut out parts of shows
    for more commercials, no end credit theme music because of promo that last
    commercial shown before show returned, and screw up the show with popup
    ads...of course I'll pay for DVD sets.
     
    Michael Walker, Nov 4, 2003
    #7
  8. Evil

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <bo6v81$s7p$>, Derek Janssen
    <> wrote:

    > Invid Fan wrote:
    >
    > >>In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    > >>DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > >>believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > >>the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > >>willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    > >
    > > Now the question becomes, will this hurt the large syndication market?

    >
    > ...WHAT syndication market??
    >
    > Syndicated reruns went out with Nick at Nite--
    > Ever since every local UHF station in the country was bought up by
    > either Fox, UPN, or Pax, what few "Seinfeld" and "Frasier" reruns are
    > still being sold nowadays are usually banished to the wee-hour airings
    > if at all...
    >

    Network progaming on those stations is two hours a night. That leaves
    22 hours a day for syndicated programing. (checks local listings) The
    local Fox, UPN and WB stations have syndicated sitcoms from 5pm till
    8pm, then start them again at 10pm. No syndicated dramas, though, until
    the weekends.

    > No *wonder* studios have inextricably worked DVD into their post-network
    > series budget plans.
    >

    Most of these shows would have ended up on one of the countless cable
    stations. Sci Fi would have run even one season shows into the ground,
    but now with stuff like Firefly going to DVD first that has to
    semi-kill that station's interest in it.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
     
    Invid Fan, Nov 4, 2003
    #8
  9. Evil

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, Mark
    Spatny <> wrote:

    > jayembee, says...
    > > The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > > believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > > the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > > willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    >
    > Here's a wild fact. According to a recent article in the Hollywood
    > Reporter, the studios have discovered that for some shows, DVD sales
    > bring in as much revenue as syndication. That's HUGE.


    But is it short term? Have sales of the first season of Buffy died off,
    resulting now in less revenue then syndication?

    > It will totally
    > change the way studios think about marketing, and financing, new series.


    With 'cult' shows like Firefly, you may even see the birth of direct to
    dvd series. Why stop produciton when the network cancels you, if you
    think you can sell the new episodes on dvd?

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
     
    Invid Fan, Nov 4, 2003
    #9
  10. Evil

    CAndersen Guest

    Derek Janssen <> wrote:

    >...WHAT syndication market??
    >
    >Syndicated reruns went out with Nick at Nite--
    >Ever since every local UHF station in the country was bought u


    Those networks only program prime time. There's still lots of time left to
    fill up with syndicated shows.


    --
    Reply address munged. You can figure it out.
     
    CAndersen, Nov 4, 2003
    #10
  11. Evil

    jayembee Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote:

    >jayembee <> wrote:
    >
    >> In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    >> DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    >> believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    >> the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    >> willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.
    >>

    >Now the question becomes, will this hurt the large syndication market?


    I doubt it. The revenue generated by syndication sales is going to be
    lower, certainly, because with DVD on the market, the value of
    syndicated reruns will go down. But I think there will always be a
    market for it, because there will always be a sizable audience of
    people who won't or can't spend money to buy the DVDs when they can
    see the shows "for free" on TV.

    DVD sales haven't stopped movies from getting syndicated.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Nov 4, 2003
    #11
  12. Evil

    jayembee Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote:

    >With 'cult' shows like Firefly, you may even see the birth of direct to
    >dvd series. Why stop produciton when the network cancels you, if you
    >think you can sell the new episodes on dvd?


    It doesn't even need to be "cult" shows. I seem to recall recently --
    I think it might've been one of the reports from the recent TV on DVD
    conference in Burbank, noted on tvshowsondvd.com -- that Joel Surnow
    and/or someone at Fox was saying that the sales of the "24" sets were
    so large that they were considering the possibility of creating a
    direct-to-DVD series. Not necessarily a "24" spin-off, but a series of
    some sort.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Nov 4, 2003
    #12
  13. Evil

    Evil Guest

    jayembee <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > (Evil) wrote:
    >
    > >well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    > >section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    > >side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    > >monthly now.

    >
    > In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    > DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.


    Kinda interesting how it is that the Studios always have to be dragged
    kicking and screaming to a new method of earning Billions and Billions
    of dollars, meanwhile some of them (Disney) go off and work really
    hard to try to lose billions of dollars (EZ-DVD).

    > >Hell, in a couple/few years, i can see release dates being totally
    > >crammed with season boxes of tv series, so much that i'll actually
    > >have to think about what i can and can't buy!

    >
    > But that's always the case, even with movies. It's all a matter of
    > triage, where you get to decide what you can or can't live without.
    > Or live without for the immediate future. Even if you decide that you
    > can't get them now, if they exist, you might still be able to get them
    > months or years down the road.


    yup. but it's worse with tv. First, with more classic tv shows
    coming out, there's more stuff that i actually want (as opposed to
    most modern movies).

    second, in a couple of years, i'll be on Simpsons S5, Futurama S4,
    Sopranos S5 (or S6?), Married with Children S3, All in the Family S3,
    Jeffersons S3, Threes Company S2, Soap S3, Looney Tunes Box 3, XFiles
    S9 (how many seasons of XF are there?), Frasier S3, Cheers S3, MASH
    S5, ...

    and meanwhile they'll be releasng exponentially more series that i'll
    have to start getting, like NewsRadio, animated The Tick, Seinfeld and
    who knows what else cool, like Courage or Dexter?

    Good thing i don't buy Felicity, Alias, Friends, Star Trek flavors,
    Hercules/Xena, SG-1, Farscape, ....

    yah, i'm only marginally complaining; it's like saying, "There's so
    many good movies out, how am i gonna go see 'em all?" (but i havent'
    said that in quite some time).

    it would be somewhat interesting to see what tv series people are
    collecting.
     
    Evil, Nov 4, 2003
    #13
  14. Evil

    eNo Guest

    "Mark Spatny" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > jayembee, says...
    > > The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    > > believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    > > the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    > > willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    >
    > Here's a wild fact. According to a recent article in the Hollywood
    > Reporter, the studios have discovered that for some shows, DVD sales
    > bring in as much revenue as syndication. That's HUGE. It will totally
    > change the way studios think about marketing, and financing, new series.


    But is that a good thing? Will it move studios away from creating material
    that appeals years down the line, and thus sustains revenues in sindication?
    Or will they come up with material akin to the
    one-week-block-buster-movie-wonder?

    --
    eNo
    "Why am I here?"
     
    eNo, Nov 4, 2003
    #14
  15. Evil

    Justin Guest

    jayembee wrote on [Tue, 04 Nov 2003 04:27:43 GMT]:
    > I doubt it. The revenue generated by syndication sales is going to be
    > lower, certainly, because with DVD on the market, the value of
    > syndicated reruns will go down. But I think there will always be a
    > market for it, because there will always be a sizable audience of
    > people who won't or can't spend money to buy the DVDs when they can
    > see the shows "for free" on TV.


    That, and the fact that most local TV stations need programming to fill
    in the hours when they have no network feed, so reruns of Will&Grace,
    Seinfeld, Friends, Raymond, etc will always be needed. Hell, we still
    get MASH and Cheers on our local channels
     
    Justin, Nov 4, 2003
    #15
  16. Evil

    Justin Guest

    jayembee wrote on [Tue, 04 Nov 2003 04:38:54 GMT]:
    >
    > It doesn't even need to be "cult" shows. I seem to recall recently --
    > I think it might've been one of the reports from the recent TV on DVD
    > conference in Burbank, noted on tvshowsondvd.com -- that Joel Surnow
    > and/or someone at Fox was saying that the sales of the "24" sets were
    > so large that they were considering the possibility of creating a
    > direct-to-DVD series. Not necessarily a "24" spin-off, but a series of
    > some sort.


    That would be great!

    It seems to work somewhat in the Anime market in Japan, and it
    definitely works for Anime sold in the US
     
    Justin, Nov 4, 2003
    #16
  17. Evil

    Justin Guest

    Evil wrote on [4 Nov 2003 08:21:22 -0800]:
    > jayembee <> wrote in message news:<>...
    >> (Evil) wrote:
    >>
    >> >well not quite, but it's gettign there. Just last year, the TV on DVD
    >> >section in Best Buy was a single bookcase, now it's almost the entire
    >> >side of an aisle wya. And there are new series being released almost
    >> >monthly now.

    >>
    >> In the past year, TV series releases have accounted for about 10% of
    >> DVD sales. The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    >> believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    >> the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    >> willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    >
    > Kinda interesting how it is that the Studios always have to be dragged
    > kicking and screaming to a new method of earning Billions and Billions
    > of dollars, meanwhile some of them (Disney) go off and work really
    > hard to try to lose billions of dollars (EZ-DVD).


    Actually, these are easier to understand once you look at it from their
    point of view, which is to make money. If you sell a series on DVD, a
    supposedly "forever" format, then you have made one sale forever to that
    person, and they can watch it as many times as they want and not pay you
    another penny. Whereas with DIVX and EZ-DVD they control how often you
    watch it and get money every time.

    > yup. but it's worse with tv. First, with more classic tv shows
    > coming out, there's more stuff that i actually want (as opposed to
    > most modern movies).
    >
    > second, in a couple of years, i'll be on Simpsons S5, Futurama S4,
    > Sopranos S5 (or S6?), Married with Children S3, All in the Family S3,
    > Jeffersons S3, Threes Company S2, Soap S3, Looney Tunes Box 3, XFiles
    > S9 (how many seasons of XF are there?), Frasier S3, Cheers S3, MASH
    > S5, ...


    X-Files Season 9, the last, will probably be out next May is my guess
    and will complete that one.

    As for what I am currently getting, Buffy will end next year, Dark Angel
    has ended, Firefly is a one season deal, of course Roswell will start up
    probably with the 6 month per season schedule for 3 seasons worth.

    > and meanwhile they'll be releasng exponentially more series that i'll
    > have to start getting, like NewsRadio, animated The Tick, Seinfeld and
    > who knows what else cool, like Courage or Dexter?


    The tick was only 13 episodes though, wasn't it? What about all the
    other shows that were cancelled before their time, like Space Above and
    Beyond, Cupid, etc.

    > Good thing i don't buy Felicity, Alias, Friends, Star Trek flavors,
    > Hercules/Xena, SG-1, Farscape, ....


    Xena.....

    > it would be somewhat interesting to see what tv series people are
    > collecting.


    Apart from above, we have Sports Night, Clerks animated, and Angel
     
    Justin, Nov 4, 2003
    #17
  18. Evil

    Justin Guest

    eNo wrote on [Tue, 4 Nov 2003 08:29:06 -0800]:
    > But is that a good thing? Will it move studios away from creating material
    > that appeals years down the line, and thus sustains revenues in sindication?
    > Or will they come up with material akin to the
    > one-week-block-buster-movie-wonder?


    Do they really concentrate on content that will survive past season one
    though? Look at the new season.... We have a romeo and juliet update,
    can you imagine that going on for more than a season? We have coupling,
    an Americanised version of a British version of Friends, already
    cancelled, we have Tru Calling, a possibly good show that will more than
    likely wind up cancelled because of it being on Thursday nights. But
    Eliza Dushku running....

    and do you really think Reality TV is material worth rewatching?
     
    Justin, Nov 4, 2003
    #18
  19. Evil

    Matt Ackeret Guest

    In article <>,
    Mark Spatny <> wrote:
    >jayembee, says...
    >> The studios are paying attention. Where before they
    >> believed that there wasn't a market for TV series on video because of
    >> the large syndication market here, they now realize that people *are*
    >> willing to plunk down money to own TV shows.

    >
    >Here's a wild fact. According to a recent article in the Hollywood
    >Reporter, the studios have discovered that for some shows, DVD sales
    >bring in as much revenue as syndication.


    I don't think that's much of a "wild fact".

    I haven't regularly watched a show in syndication for *many* years,
    because they're way hacked up. The last time I tried was L.A. Law several
    years ago on A&E (I was too young to enjoy dramas like that when it originally
    aired). Within several days, I noticed that there were segments in the
    "previously on" at the beginning that actually weren't shown! This was
    starting from the very beginning.

    I'm just waiting for more shows to come out on DVD. I'm not buying
    many (I'll likely *eventually* get the Trek shows, and if Blake's 7 ever
    comes out, that.. but even for the Trek shows, I may wait for super duper
    DVD, and buy the existing set dirt cheap), but I have rented some from
    netflix, and will rent more in the future.

    Actually, there was a bit in StudioBriefing on imdb within the past few
    weeks about direct-to-DVD TV shows! One was a version of '24'. No, I don't
    mean a version of the existing show, but another story. (Yes, I know they're
    technically not the same as regular "TV shows" if they didn't originally air
    on broadcast/cable, but you get the idea.)
     
    Matt Ackeret, Nov 5, 2003
    #19
  20. Evil

    Metlhd3138 Guest

    >>...WHAT syndication market??
    >>
    >>Syndicated reruns went out with Nick at Nite--
    >>Ever since every local UHF station in the country was bought u

    >
    >Those networks only program prime time. There's still lots of time left to
    >fill up with syndicated shows.


    Plus there are shows which you may not want the whole series of, but which are
    good for viewing when nothing else good is on (ie, everybody loves raymond,
    becker, etc). I mean, i really cant see a dvd market for "8 simple rules" or
    "grounded for life" but i can see those shows doing very well on syndication.
     
    Metlhd3138, Nov 5, 2003
    #20
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