Looking for PCMCIA type I or II network adapter

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Rudy Lopez, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. Rudy Lopez

    Rudy Lopez Guest

    I asked about this before, but I am continuing to have problems with
    this.

    I have an older laptop (a Dell Latitude LM) and the system manual
    swears it has two PCMCIA Type II slots.

    I have a bunch of older PCMCIA cards that fit into it. These are
    mainly modems and network adapters.

    I am trying to set up a wireless network now and every card I have
    tried has turned out to be a Cardbus card no matter what the box says.

    The latest card was a Linksys WPC11 ver 4. The website claims the card
    will fit into a PCMCIA type II slot and tech support claims this is
    true too, however the box says it is a Cardbus card. It looks like a
    Cardbus card and it doesn't fit into the PCMCIA slots on my laptop.

    How can I obtain a wireless adapater that *will* fit into my laptop?
    Rudy Lopez, Oct 22, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Rudy Lopez

    Rudy Lopez Guest

    On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 02:33:13 GMT, Barry Watzman
    <> wrote:

    >The original poster is confusing "Type I" and "Type II" with 16-bit and
    >32-bit (cardbus) PC Cards. They are totally unrelated.
    >


    Actually, I never mentioned 16-bit vs. 32-bit in my original post. I
    strictly was talking about how the Cardbus cards will not fit into my
    laptop which has a PCMCIA type II slots.

    I did some reading in my A-Plus study guide before I asked the
    question here. The book explained the keying differences and
    incompatibilities between the different interfaces.

    I bought a card from e-bay. It arrived and was a different card than
    the one pictured in the auction. It is a Cardbus interface also.

    I have learned three things:

    (1) almost everybody including tech support people at Linksys think
    that the terms PCMCIA, PC-Card and Cardbus are interchangeable.

    (2) online product requirement specs often say "PCMCIA Type II" when
    the card is in fact a Cardbus card.

    (3) Cardbus cards are most easily recognizable by a brass band or
    strip near the edge. If the picture on the box has a brass band the
    card is a Cardbus card no matter what anyone says. The strip isn't
    required by the Cardbus spec as far as I know, but if it is on the
    card the card will NOT fit into a PCMCIA slot.



    So...I am still looking.
    Rudy Lopez, Oct 28, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Rudy Lopez

    el Diablo Guest

    I think this is what Barry was trying to convey:


    Cardbus (32-bit) ---+
    |--- Type I ----+
    16-bit (name ??) ---+ |
    +--- PC Card (PCMCIA)
    Cardbus (32-bit) ---+ |
    |--- Type II ---+
    16-bit (name ??) ---+


    I personally haven't seen any Cardbus Type I Style PC Cards. That
    doesn't mean that they don't exist; just that they don't have a large
    market share.

    Please correct me if I am wrong.


    Barry Watzman wrote:
    > The original poster is confusing "Type I" and "Type II" with 16-bit and
    > 32-bit (cardbus) PC Cards. They are totally unrelated.
    >
    > Type I and Type II ONLY address the physical size (specifically
    > thickness) of the card. Both type 1 and type II cards can be either
    > 16-bit or 32-bit (cardbus) cards.
    >
    > What the OP needs is a 16-bit (non-Cardbus) 802.11 card. Whether it's
    > type I or type II is totally irrelevant, and his confusion of the
    > terminology is not helping matters one bit.
    >
    > Now as to whether or not such a card exists, I'm not sure, but if they
    > do at all, they are likely to be very early cards best found used on

    E-Bay.
    >
    >

    Rudy Lopez wrote:
    > On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 02:33:13 GMT, Barry Watzman
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The original poster is confusing "Type I" and "Type II" with 16-bit and
    >>32-bit (cardbus) PC Cards. They are totally unrelated.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Actually, I never mentioned 16-bit vs. 32-bit in my original post. I
    > strictly was talking about how the Cardbus cards will not fit into my
    > laptop which has a PCMCIA type II slots.
    >
    > I did some reading in my A-Plus study guide before I asked the
    > question here. The book explained the keying differences and
    > incompatibilities between the different interfaces.
    >
    > I bought a card from e-bay. It arrived and was a different card than
    > the one pictured in the auction. It is a Cardbus interface also.
    >
    > I have learned three things:
    >
    > (1) almost everybody including tech support people at Linksys think
    > that the terms PCMCIA, PC-Card and Cardbus are interchangeable.
    >
    > (2) online product requirement specs often say "PCMCIA Type II" when
    > the card is in fact a Cardbus card.
    >
    > (3) Cardbus cards are most easily recognizable by a brass band or
    > strip near the edge. If the picture on the box has a brass band the
    > card is a Cardbus card no matter what anyone says. The strip isn't
    > required by the Cardbus spec as far as I know, but if it is on the
    > card the card will NOT fit into a PCMCIA slot.
    >
    >
    >
    > So...I am still looking.
    el Diablo, Nov 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Rudy Lopez

    AG Guest

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Re: "I personally haven't seen any Cardbus Type I Style PC Cards."
    >
    > No, you guys still don't have it right.
    >
    > The ONLY difference between a type I card and a type II card is the
    > physical THICKNESS of the card; basically, a type II card is "double
    > thick". It has NOTHING to do, EITHER WAY, with whether it's 16-bit or
    > 32-bit (Cardbus). A 16-bit card can by type I or type II, and a 32-bit
    > (Cardbus) card can also be type I or type II.
    >
    > In fact, it's a type II card that you have probably never seen. There are
    > very few type II cards (which are physically obvious because they are
    > quite thick and "take up" two PC-card slots at once for the single card).
    > Primarily, they very old "hard drive cards", and a few network cards with
    > built-in connectors (RJ-45) using a conventional design (a real RJ-45
    > jack, not a n "X-Jack"). Intel and Xircom (which Intel bought) made some
    > cards like that.
    >
    > What the original poster is looking for, I believe, was a 16-bit (non
    > Cardbus) 802.11 wireless card. I'd think that quite a few early 802.11b
    > cards might fit this description, although I'm not certain of that.

    One that would be what he wants is the Orinoco Gold cards. They are non
    cardbus cards.
    What's really strange is that I have a couple of D-Link card that is takes
    up both slots because the plug is so thick. One is a network card and the
    other is USB 2.0.

    AG
    AG, Nov 4, 2004
    #4
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,484
  2. Jose

    SMC wireless adapter USB or PCMCIA?

    Jose, Sep 9, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    646
  3. Jack Torrence

    xD Type H compatible PCMCIA Adapter

    Jack Torrence, Jan 30, 2007, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    737
    Phil Stripling
    Feb 9, 2007
  4. DONOTREPLY
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,238
    Roger Johnstone
    May 12, 2007
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    751
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page