looking for feed back before purchase

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by map, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. map

    map Guest

    hi everyone,

    after reading lots of reviews, I'm looking for users feedback before
    purchasing my 1st DSLR.
    does anyone have experience with the 400D and the D80?
    (I took both in a shop. D80 is certainly more comfortable and feels more
    robust but I use a light weight F75 for years that has a handgrip about
    between the 400d and the d80)
    I will probably buy the sigma 17-70 f2.8/4.5 or the tamron 17-50 f2.8.
    again, experience with those?
    (If I choose the D80, I'll perhaps take the 17-135 but I couldn't find
    any review. (but there is already a recent post for that topic) )
    I read tamron is better quality and tokina worst. can a lens break or
    collect dust after years of non professional use?
    last thing : the 400D handgrip is too small for me but I imagine to
    emprove it with some rubber : the one used for tennis raquets. any idea
    about that?

    thank you very much for sharing multiple experience/ideas.
     
    map, Nov 4, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. map

    bmoag Guest

    If you are planning to buy lenses and not leverage an existing collection of
    autofocus lenses you have an abundance of choices.
    My personal preference is for the D80. The Nikon D200/80/70 dSLRs have very
    sophisticated programming and options that distinguish them from other
    cameras using the ubiquitous sony made imaging sensors.
    My personal opinion is that dSLRs are very heavy point and shoot cameras if
    you only plan to shoot jpegs. In addition to camera and lenses an investment
    in an imaging processing program, and particularly investing the time to
    learn the basics, so you can shoot in raw will improve your results more
    than anything. These dSLRs are more sophisticated than the F75 and to get
    the most out of them require familiarity with the peculiarities of digital
    imaging as well as general photography.
    You can get excellent results more simply with a more advanced P&S type
    camera, e,g, the long zooms with built in image stabilization.
    If you do not already have Nikon autofocus lenses you may want to look into
    the Sony Alpha. It has the same sensor as the Nikon plus vibration reduction
    built into the camera body and the kit 17-80 lens is highly rated. The Nikon
    has more sophisticated in camera processing options and controls but you may
    never even be aware these exist.
    The 18-70 Nikon kit lens is an excellent value and you may want to consider
    geting this with the camera unless you need the f2.8 aperture for some
    specific reason. The Tamron and Sigma perform comparably to the Nikon and
    Sony kit lenses and are probably better than the comparable Canon kit
    lenses. The Nikon 18-135 is an unknown and early written reviews are not
    always trustworthy. However the only really horrible lens in the Nikon
    catalogue is the 55-200.
    If you like Canons, go with Canon. If you wait a month or so Pentax will be
    out with a comparable 10mp sony sensor camera.
    And the truth is that 6mp sensors have more than enough picture information
    for the vast majority of users.
     
    bmoag, Nov 5, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. map

    map Guest

    bmoag a écrit :
    > If you are planning to buy lenses and not leverage an existing collection of
    > autofocus lenses you have an abundance of choices.
    > My personal preference is for the D80. The Nikon D200/80/70 dSLRs have very
    > sophisticated programming and options that distinguish them from other
    > cameras using the ubiquitous sony made imaging sensors.
    > My personal opinion is that dSLRs are very heavy point and shoot cameras if
    > you only plan to shoot jpegs. In addition to camera and lenses an investment
    > in an imaging processing program, and particularly investing the time to
    > learn the basics, so you can shoot in raw will improve your results more
    > than anything. These dSLRs are more sophisticated than the F75 and to get
    > the most out of them require familiarity with the peculiarities of digital
    > imaging as well as general photography.
    > You can get excellent results more simply with a more advanced P&S type
    > camera, e,g, the long zooms with built in image stabilization.
    > If you do not already have Nikon autofocus lenses you may want to look into
    > the Sony Alpha. It has the same sensor as the Nikon plus vibration reduction
    > built into the camera body and the kit 17-80 lens is highly rated. The Nikon
    > has more sophisticated in camera processing options and controls but you may
    > never even be aware these exist.
    > The 18-70 Nikon kit lens is an excellent value and you may want to consider
    > geting this with the camera unless you need the f2.8 aperture for some
    > specific reason. The Tamron and Sigma perform comparably to the Nikon and
    > Sony kit lenses and are probably better than the comparable Canon kit
    > lenses. The Nikon 18-135 is an unknown and early written reviews are not
    > always trustworthy. However the only really horrible lens in the Nikon
    > catalogue is the 55-200.
    > If you like Canons, go with Canon. If you wait a month or so Pentax will be
    > out with a comparable 10mp sony sensor camera.
    > And the truth is that 6mp sensors have more than enough picture information
    > for the vast majority of users.
    >
    >

    thank you for your extensive answer.
    to go further, I'm interested in dSLR for the viewfinder, sensitivity
    and control. I think I'll get only the jpg for 90% of my shootings,
    but for particular contrasty or particular pictures, I'll use the raw
    and post process. I don't know for the moment how this will take time :
    I wonder if it is possible to write scripts and apply on a set of
    images. for a few shots, i'll probably want to correct barrel distortion
    and vigneting but I don't know if it is easy (for exemple by getting the
    good parameters out of the jpeg/raw file)
    the sony dSLR is also interesting but is the first of sony and I think
    it is possible that in 5/10 years sony stops digital photography as
    minoltat did (yes, it is not highly probable). it is less risky for
    canon and nikon I guess.
    you said the sony kit 17-80 lens is highly rated. where did you find a
    review? I couldn't find one.
    (f2.8 is interesting for me 'cause I like shooting indoor without flash
    or just a little fillin flash and I love dark atmospheres)
     
    map, Nov 5, 2006
    #3
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Phil Collin

    Feed Back Requested

    Phil Collin, Oct 12, 2006, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    20
    Views:
    876
    Phil Collin
    Oct 16, 2006
  2. Tim Bryant
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    851
    Evan Platt
    Feb 13, 2007
  3. Eddie Willis

    any feed back on the ASUS M2N-E Motherboard?

    Eddie Willis, Sep 3, 2006, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    414
    John Barnes
    Sep 3, 2006
  4. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,429
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
  5. JSIC (Justified Soley In Christ)

    Constructive Feed Back

    JSIC (Justified Soley In Christ), Jul 27, 2005, in forum: MCDST
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    376
    JSIC (Justified Soley In Christ)
    Jul 29, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page