Locking folders

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Addisons, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. Addisons

    Addisons Guest

    I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the option to lock
    out any of my folders. The option to do so is grayed out. I have the only
    administrator account on the computer.


    TIA,
    Hawkeye65
    Addisons, Jan 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. Addisons

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    Addisons spewed forth:
    > I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the option to
    > lock out any of my folders. The option to do so is grayed out. I have
    > the only administrator account on the computer.
    >
    >
    > TIA,
    > Hawkeye65


    What do you mean "lock out"? Are you talking about encryption? Encryption
    doesn't work in XP Home. But there are better solutions on the web. I like
    this one: http://www.truecrypt.org/

    --
    Whenever I think of the past, it brings back so many memories...
    Toolman Tim, Jan 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. Addisons

    samuel Guest

    "Addisons" <> wrote in
    news::

    > I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the
    > option to lock out any of my folders. The option to do so is
    > grayed out. I have the only administrator account on the
    > computer.
    >
    >
    > TIA,
    > Hawkeye65


    did you have a question ?
    samuel, Jan 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Addisons

    Martik Guest

    "Addisons" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the option to lock
    >out any of my folders. The option to do so is grayed out. I have the only
    >administrator account on the computer.
    >
    >
    > TIA,
    > Hawkeye65


    Just select properties and hide the folder, then tools,options, 'do not show
    hidden...'

    Otherwise wade thru this:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;304040
    Martik, Jan 5, 2006
    #4
  5. Addisons

    Martik Guest

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:GH1vf.261$...
    > In news:,
    > Addisons spewed forth:
    >> I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the option to
    >> lock out any of my folders. The option to do so is grayed out. I have
    >> the only administrator account on the computer.
    >>
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >> Hawkeye65

    >
    > What do you mean "lock out"? Are you talking about encryption? Encryption
    > doesn't work in XP Home. But there are better solutions on the web. I like
    > this one: http://www.truecrypt.org/


    That is so cool! Obvious weakness is that the container file could become
    corrupted resulting in a total loss of data. I'll have to investigate the
    device/partition options later.
    Martik, Jan 5, 2006
    #5
  6. "Martik" <> wrote in
    news:1Afvf.36100$AP5.1829@edtnps84:

    >>> I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the
    >>> option to lock out any of my folders. The option to do so is
    >>> grayed out. I have the only administrator account on the
    >>> computer.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> TIA,
    >>> Hawkeye65

    >>
    >> What do you mean "lock out"? Are you talking about encryption?
    >> Encryption doesn't work in XP Home. But there are better
    >> solutions on the web. I like this one: http://www.truecrypt.org/

    >
    > That is so cool! Obvious weakness is that the container file could
    > become corrupted resulting in a total loss of data. I'll have to
    > investigate the device/partition options later.
    >
    >


    I use this Truecrypt and have never had problems. Nevertheless,
    using a system like this does not relieve the user of keeping
    regular archive/backups. I prefer to size my container files such
    that they just fit onto a CD or DVD. Then backups are as simple as
    burning the container file onto the CD/DVD. Everything is then
    backed up, secure, and encrypted so long as you remember your
    passphrase...

    Using Microsoft's Encrypted File System has the disadvantage that
    the key to the encryption is contained in a certificate under the
    user's profile. Unless this certificate is backed up, a system
    crash or profile crash can cause loss of data even though the
    encrypted data itself is archived. It also makes it extremely
    difficult to move data from one machine to another securely (USB
    Drive) or securely access the data over the network from another
    machine. Truecrypt does not suffer these inconveniences.

    HTH,
    john
    John Wunderlich, Jan 5, 2006
    #6
  7. Addisons

    Martik Guest

    "John Wunderlich" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns974293F17CC7Bwunderpsdrscraytheon@138.126.254.210...
    > "Martik" <> wrote in
    > news:1Afvf.36100$AP5.1829@edtnps84:
    >
    >>>> I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the
    >>>> option to lock out any of my folders. The option to do so is
    >>>> grayed out. I have the only administrator account on the
    >>>> computer.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> TIA,
    >>>> Hawkeye65
    >>>
    >>> What do you mean "lock out"? Are you talking about encryption?
    >>> Encryption doesn't work in XP Home. But there are better
    >>> solutions on the web. I like this one: http://www.truecrypt.org/

    >>
    >> That is so cool! Obvious weakness is that the container file could
    >> become corrupted resulting in a total loss of data. I'll have to
    >> investigate the device/partition options later.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I use this Truecrypt and have never had problems. Nevertheless,
    > using a system like this does not relieve the user of keeping
    > regular archive/backups. I prefer to size my container files such
    > that they just fit onto a CD or DVD. Then backups are as simple as
    > burning the container file onto the CD/DVD. Everything is then
    > backed up, secure, and encrypted so long as you remember your
    > passphrase...
    >
    > Using Microsoft's Encrypted File System has the disadvantage that
    > the key to the encryption is contained in a certificate under the
    > user's profile. Unless this certificate is backed up, a system
    > crash or profile crash can cause loss of data even though the
    > encrypted data itself is archived. It also makes it extremely
    > difficult to move data from one machine to another securely (USB
    > Drive) or securely access the data over the network from another
    > machine. Truecrypt does not suffer these inconveniences.



    Thanks, note also that MS Encrypted File System does
    NOT hide the file names.
    Martik, Jan 5, 2006
    #7
  8. Addisons

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:p7ivf.36142$AP5.27530@edtnps84,
    Martik spewed forth:
    > "John Wunderlich" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns974293F17CC7Bwunderpsdrscraytheon@138.126.254.210...
    >> "Martik" <> wrote in
    >> news:1Afvf.36100$AP5.1829@edtnps84:
    >>
    >>>>> I am running WindowsXP Home Edition, SP2. I do not have the
    >>>>> option to lock out any of my folders. The option to do so is
    >>>>> grayed out. I have the only administrator account on the
    >>>>> computer.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> TIA,
    >>>>> Hawkeye65
    >>>>
    >>>> What do you mean "lock out"? Are you talking about encryption?
    >>>> Encryption doesn't work in XP Home. But there are better
    >>>> solutions on the web. I like this one: http://www.truecrypt.org/
    >>>
    >>> That is so cool! Obvious weakness is that the container file could
    >>> become corrupted resulting in a total loss of data. I'll have to
    >>> investigate the device/partition options later.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> I use this Truecrypt and have never had problems. Nevertheless,
    >> using a system like this does not relieve the user of keeping
    >> regular archive/backups. I prefer to size my container files such
    >> that they just fit onto a CD or DVD. Then backups are as simple as
    >> burning the container file onto the CD/DVD. Everything is then
    >> backed up, secure, and encrypted so long as you remember your
    >> passphrase...


    Great tip - thanks :)

    >> Using Microsoft's Encrypted File System has the disadvantage that
    >> the key to the encryption is contained in a certificate under the
    >> user's profile. Unless this certificate is backed up, a system
    >> crash or profile crash can cause loss of data even though the
    >> encrypted data itself is archived. It also makes it extremely
    >> difficult to move data from one machine to another securely (USB
    >> Drive) or securely access the data over the network from another
    >> machine. Truecrypt does not suffer these inconveniences.

    >
    >
    > Thanks, note also that MS Encrypted File System does
    > NOT hide the file names.


    An excellent observation!

    --
    Whenever I think of the past, it brings back so many memories...
    Toolman Tim, Jan 6, 2006
    #8
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