linux users: You can start getting scared now.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by john, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. john

    john Guest

    Cross Platform Virus Created

    http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744

    I have said before and I am not changing this statment:
    If linux gets as many users as windows, then viruses will be written for it
    also.
    There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.

    --
    Kenny - www.ComputerBoom.com

    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

    -Arthur C. Clarke
    --
     
    john, Apr 10, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. john

    7 Guest

    Re: Windoze installer is viral!!!!!!!!

    "john" <-> wrote:

    > Cross Platform Virus Created
    >
    > http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744
    >
    > I have said before and I am not changing this statment:
    > If linux gets as many users as windows, then viruses will be written for
    > it also.
    > There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.



    The windoze installer is viral and you should not use
    it to repair windoze.
    Police need to conduct raids to arrest anyone selling
    windoze installers.
    It functions similarly to a virus and
    deletes other operating systems such as GNU/Linux while
    SuSE Linux and Ubuntu picks up other Linux installs and windoze
    and does not delete them.
     
    7, Apr 10, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. john

    john Guest

    Re: Windoze installer is viral!!!!!!!!

    Yes you are correct. If you install windows on a second partition after you
    install linux it erases the boot manager of linux. You can boot with the
    linux cd and
    repair it though in most cases...at least thats what I did with suse or
    mandrake, if I can recall... if I am
    mistaken correct me.
    I usually install linux as a second OS after windows... so I have not done
    that many times.
    I have used a bootmanager www.osloader.com that is very good and
    solves all those problems



    --
    Kenny - www.ComputerBoom.com

    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

    -Arthur C. Clarke
    --
    "7" <> wrote in message
    news:JlA_f.51152$...
    > "john" <-> wrote:
    >
    >> Cross Platform Virus Created
    >>
    >> http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744
    >>
    >> I have said before and I am not changing this statment:
    >> If linux gets as many users as windows, then viruses will be written for
    >> it also.
    >> There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.

    >
    >
    > The windoze installer is viral and you should not use
    > it to repair windoze.
    > Police need to conduct raids to arrest anyone selling
    > windoze installers.
    > It functions similarly to a virus and
    > deletes other operating systems such as GNU/Linux while
    > SuSE Linux and Ubuntu picks up other Linux installs and windoze
    > and does not delete them.
    >
    >
     
    john, Apr 10, 2006
    #3
  4. john

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-10, john <-> wrote:
    > Cross Platform Virus Created
    >
    > http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744
    >
    > I have said before and I am not changing this statment:
    > If linux gets as many users as windows, then viruses will be written for it
    > also.
    > There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.


    <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/10/06/linux_vs_windows_viruses/> "To
    mess up a Linux box, you need to work at it; to mess up your Windows box,
    you just need to work on it, ..."

    <http://librenix.com/?inode=21> "... For a Linux binary virus to infect
    executables, those executables must be writable by the user activating the
    virus. That is not likely to be the case. Chances are, the programs are
    owned by root and the user is running from a non-privileged account.
    Further, the less experienced the user, the lower the likelihood that he
    actually owns any executable programs. Therefore, the users who are the
    least savvy about such hazards are also the ones with the least fertile
    home directories for viruses. ..."

    How to write a Linux virus <http://freshmeat.net/projects/viruswriting/>
    (Issued under the GNU Free Documentation License (FDL); see, even the
    malware is FOSS).

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 10, 2006
    #4
  5. john

    Seatoller Guest

    It was on Mon, 10 Apr 2006 23:51:40 +0100, that Whiskers wrote:

    > On 2006-04-10, john <-> wrote:
    >> Cross Platform Virus Created
    >>
    >> http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744
    >>
    >> I have said before and I am not changing this statment: If linux gets as
    >> many users as windows, then viruses will be written for it also.
    >> There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.


    So this "John" know more about linux than the security experts, eh?
    AS the majority of the web runs on linux servers, I wonder why that hasn't
    happened yet...
    Funny how windows users seem to think that all OSs work the same way as
    windoze. Also, the average linux user is more intelligent than
    the average windows user.

    > <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/10/06/linux_vs_windows_viruses/> "To
    > mess up a Linux box, you need to work at it; to mess up your Windows
    > box, you just need to work on it, ..."
    >
    > <http://librenix.com/?inode=21> "... For a Linux binary virus to infect
    > executables, those executables must be writable by the user activating
    > the virus. That is not likely to be the case. Chances are, the programs
    > are owned by root and the user is running from a non-privileged account.


    Quite so. Even /if/ the user was to get a virus/worm etc, it would /only/
    affect that particular user & NOT the whole system. :)
    In such a case that particular "user" partition could be nuked, without
    touching any other part of the system. This is partly why previous
    attempts at viruses/worms, have not been successful. They quickly die out.

    > Further, the less experienced the user, the lower the likelihood that he
    > actually owns any executable programs. Therefore, the users who are the
    > least savvy about such hazards are also the ones with the least fertile
    > home directories for viruses. ..."


    Good point :)
    In linux the USER /by default/ does /not/ have admin privleges.

    > How to write a Linux virus <http://freshmeat.net/projects/viruswriting/>
    > (Issued under the GNU Free Documentation License (FDL); see, even the
    > malware is FOSS).


    Worms and viruses are so stunningly effective on Windows, only because
    Windows provides some /atrocious/ functionality which makes it easy for
    worms to strike. It might seem counterintuitive but Windows Registry, &
    a misdesigned Windows Update are the primary culprits that create a
    hospitable environment for worms and other malware.

    The critical flaws in Windows comes from the lack of an executable flag in
    file permissions and a file's type being determined by its filename
    extension. This means that windows will execute a file purely based on its
    filename extension. This fundamental flaw is why Windows will never ever
    be secure.
    Windows has a lot of executables from ade to exe, reg, scr, sys right
    through to xl*. In all there are 45 executables so if a file ends with
    *any* of those, it can be run as a program! Windows lets the user be an
    *admin*, & it's got *least* 45 executables that can activate malware??
    Sheesh! Malware has also got one BIG central target to aim at & hide in -
    The Registry. No such thing exists in linux.

    Linux executables generally depend up which distro your using, rpm (SuSE,
    Fedora), md.rpm (Mandriva), deb (Debian), along with tar, tar.bz2, &
    tar.gz. & NO registry to hide in. Not only that, but if the MD5checksum
    doesn't match the distro's database, the package manager won't even
    download it.

    It's easier to run executables in the Windows world, because the user IS
    the admin. This would require far more steps and far greater effort on the
    part of the Linux user. Instead of just reading an email, a Linux user
    would have to read the email, save the attachment, give the attachment
    executable permissions IF he can, and then run the executable.

    --
    The short life and hard times of a Linux virus
    http://librenix.com/?inode=21
    Linux vs. Windows Viruses
    http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/188
     
    Seatoller, Apr 11, 2006
    #5
  6. john

    Al Klein Guest

    On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 00:34:34 +0300, "john" <-> wrote:

    >Cross Platform Virus Created


    >http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744


    It's a bit of fun reading all the misinformation on that site. There
    are about 4 posters who actually know what they're talking about.
     
    Al Klein, Apr 11, 2006
    #6
  7. No Real Need To (was Re: linux users: You can start getting scared now.)

    john wrote:

    > Cross Platform Virus Created
    >
    > http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744
    >
    > I have said before and I am not changing this statment: If linux gets as
    > many users as windows, then viruses will be written for it also.
    > There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.


    This one isn't a real Linux threat because of what it would take to
    actually run the code. He'd have to *want* to run it and intentionally
    and take steps to do so. In short: <yawn>


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Coming Soon: Filtering rules specific to various real news clients
     
    Blinky the Shark, Apr 11, 2006
    #7
  8. john

    john Guest

    Yes I know all this.
    I am not a "windows user" alone. I use linux also for many years.

    I am just saying.. if hackers can get into super top secret computer
    networks and steal information,
    (which they can and do), they can find a way to make a virus that will bring
    down linux systems.
    Its just a matter of people sitting down and thinking about it.

    Don't underestimate the cleverness of these hackers & virus writers. Some of
    them
    have IQs well over 160 and have devoted their lives in learning this stuff.
    Some are considered a threat to the world and they are banned to even be
    near a computer!

    If linux was to go into mainstream they would have a new arena to "play" in.
    And a new "challenge", that would make them sleepless until they found a way
    to bring down the systems. This is what drives them, challenge, and the
    knowledge
    that they are "masters" of computer systems.

    Let me repeat. They would not sleep until they would find a way to
    compromise linux systems.

    They just don't have a reason to hit on linux systems yet.
    But mark my words.
    If Linux becomes mainstream as desktop computers, it will get viruses!

    --
    Kenny - www.ComputerBoom.com

    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

    -Arthur C. Clarke
    --
    "Seatoller" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > It was on Mon, 10 Apr 2006 23:51:40 +0100, that Whiskers wrote:
    >
    >> On 2006-04-10, john <-> wrote:
    >>> Cross Platform Virus Created
    >>>
    >>> http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744
    >>>
    >>> I have said before and I am not changing this statment: If linux gets as
    >>> many users as windows, then viruses will be written for it also.
    >>> There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.

    >
    > So this "John" know more about linux than the security experts, eh?
    > AS the majority of the web runs on linux servers, I wonder why that hasn't
    > happened yet...
    > Funny how windows users seem to think that all OSs work the same way as
    > windoze. Also, the average linux user is more intelligent than
    > the average windows user.
    >
    >> <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/10/06/linux_vs_windows_viruses/> "To
    >> mess up a Linux box, you need to work at it; to mess up your Windows
    >> box, you just need to work on it, ..."
    >>
    >> <http://librenix.com/?inode=21> "... For a Linux binary virus to infect
    >> executables, those executables must be writable by the user activating
    >> the virus. That is not likely to be the case. Chances are, the programs
    >> are owned by root and the user is running from a non-privileged account.

    >
    > Quite so. Even /if/ the user was to get a virus/worm etc, it would /only/
    > affect that particular user & NOT the whole system. :)
    > In such a case that particular "user" partition could be nuked, without
    > touching any other part of the system. This is partly why previous
    > attempts at viruses/worms, have not been successful. They quickly die out.
    >
    >> Further, the less experienced the user, the lower the likelihood that he
    >> actually owns any executable programs. Therefore, the users who are the
    >> least savvy about such hazards are also the ones with the least fertile
    >> home directories for viruses. ..."

    >
    > Good point :)
    > In linux the USER /by default/ does /not/ have admin privleges.
    >
    >> How to write a Linux virus <http://freshmeat.net/projects/viruswriting/>
    >> (Issued under the GNU Free Documentation License (FDL); see, even the
    >> malware is FOSS).

    >
    > Worms and viruses are so stunningly effective on Windows, only because
    > Windows provides some /atrocious/ functionality which makes it easy for
    > worms to strike. It might seem counterintuitive but Windows Registry, &
    > a misdesigned Windows Update are the primary culprits that create a
    > hospitable environment for worms and other malware.
    >
    > The critical flaws in Windows comes from the lack of an executable flag in
    > file permissions and a file's type being determined by its filename
    > extension. This means that windows will execute a file purely based on its
    > filename extension. This fundamental flaw is why Windows will never ever
    > be secure.
    > Windows has a lot of executables from ade to exe, reg, scr, sys right
    > through to xl*. In all there are 45 executables so if a file ends with
    > *any* of those, it can be run as a program! Windows lets the user be an
    > *admin*, & it's got *least* 45 executables that can activate malware??
    > Sheesh! Malware has also got one BIG central target to aim at & hide in -
    > The Registry. No such thing exists in linux.
    >
    > Linux executables generally depend up which distro your using, rpm (SuSE,
    > Fedora), md.rpm (Mandriva), deb (Debian), along with tar, tar.bz2, &
    > tar.gz. & NO registry to hide in. Not only that, but if the MD5checksum
    > doesn't match the distro's database, the package manager won't even
    > download it.
    >
    > It's easier to run executables in the Windows world, because the user IS
    > the admin. This would require far more steps and far greater effort on the
    > part of the Linux user. Instead of just reading an email, a Linux user
    > would have to read the email, save the attachment, give the attachment
    > executable permissions IF he can, and then run the executable.
    >
    > --
    > The short life and hard times of a Linux virus
    > http://librenix.com/?inode=21
    > Linux vs. Windows Viruses
    > http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/188
     
    john, Apr 11, 2006
    #8
  9. john

    john Guest

    I know more than those 4 people combined, read my reply to seatroller above.

    --
    Kenny - www.ComputerBoom.com

    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

    -Arthur C. Clarke
    --
    "Al Klein" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 00:34:34 +0300, "john" <-> wrote:
    >
    >>Cross Platform Virus Created

    >
    >>http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744

    >
    > It's a bit of fun reading all the misinformation on that site. There
    > are about 4 posters who actually know what they're talking about.
     
    john, Apr 11, 2006
    #9
  10. john

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "john" <-> wrote in message news:-privat.org...
    > Yes I know all this.
    > I am not a "windows user" alone. I use linux also for many years.
    >
    > I am just saying.. if hackers can get into super top secret computer
    > networks and steal information,
    > (which they can and do), they can find a way to make a virus that will
    > bring down linux systems.
    > Its just a matter of people sitting down and thinking about it.
    >
    > Don't underestimate the cleverness of these hackers & virus writers. Some
    > of them
    > have IQs well over 160 and have devoted their lives in learning this
    > stuff.
    > Some are considered a threat to the world and they are banned to even be
    > near a computer!
    >
    > If linux was to go into mainstream they would have a new arena to "play"
    > in.
    > And a new "challenge", that would make them sleepless until they found a
    > way
    > to bring down the systems. This is what drives them, challenge, and the
    > knowledge
    > that they are "masters" of computer systems.
    >
    > Let me repeat. They would not sleep until they would find a way to
    > compromise linux systems.
    >
    > They just don't have a reason to hit on linux systems yet.
    > But mark my words.
    > If Linux becomes mainstream as desktop computers, it will get viruses!
    >


    Agreed, Linux is a piece of trash just like the rest of them full of holes
    yet to be exploited as the masses are not using that O/S that much and they
    have no real reason to come after Linux. Let the masses use Linux and then
    watch Linux *revealed* by the them.

    It's the same old song and dance by the Linux users in the NG.

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Apr 11, 2006
    #10
  11. john

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-11, john <-> wrote:
    > Yes I know all this.
    > I am not a "windows user" alone. I use linux also for many years.
    >
    > I am just saying.. if hackers can get into super top secret computer
    > networks and steal information,
    > (which they can and do), they can find a way to make a virus that will bring
    > down linux systems.
    > Its just a matter of people sitting down and thinking about it.


    Any system can be compromised by human error or foolishness; that is how
    people 'hack into' government and commercial networks. They find
    passwords, they find un-secured servers, they trick people into revealing
    information.

    > Don't underestimate the cleverness of these hackers & virus writers. Some of
    > them
    > have IQs well over 160 and have devoted their lives in learning this stuff.
    > Some are considered a threat to the world and they are banned to even be
    > near a computer!


    Well, no government likes to made to look incompetent so knee-jerk
    reactions are always happening. Besides, it often is illegal to access a
    government computer without permission, so some sort of punishment is
    inevitable.

    > If linux was to go into mainstream they would have a new arena to "play" in.
    > And a new "challenge", that would make them sleepless until they found a way
    > to bring down the systems. This is what drives them, challenge, and the
    > knowledge
    > that they are "masters" of computer systems.


    That would be why so many Linux and Unix servers are being 'hacked' and
    'crashed' all the time so that the internet hardly ever works.

    > Let me repeat. They would not sleep until they would find a way to
    > compromise linux systems.
    >
    > They just don't have a reason to hit on linux systems yet.
    > But mark my words.
    > If Linux becomes mainstream as desktop computers, it will get viruses!


    There are ways to compromise Linux systems; viruses are not an effective
    approach though - and each system has to be attacked individually, because
    they are all different, so a kiddy can't just download a block of code and
    plant it in a web site or spam email and sit back while thousands of
    systems fall into his power. Instead, each victim has to be found,
    identified, probed, analysed, and probed again and again before even
    deciding if it is both vulnerable and worth exploiting; that takes a lot
    of knowledge and a great deal of time and effort - just to get control of
    *one* system.

    The most likely way for any Linux system to become compromised starts with
    someone gaining physical access to the machine. Almost all of the Linux
    'exploits' announced include phrases such as 'a user could be tricked into
    ....' or 'a malicious user could ...'. And then the bug is patched,
    sometimes within hours - and often in the same announcement, by the person
    who found the flaw in the first place.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 11, 2006
    #11
  12. john

    Seatoller Guest

    It was on Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:10:12 +0100, that Whiskers wrote:

    > On 2006-04-11, john <-> wrote:
    >> Yes I know all this.
    >> I am not a "windows user" alone. I use linux also for many years.
    >> I am just saying.. if hackers can get into super top secret computer
    >> networks and steal information,
    >> (which they can and do), they can find a way to make a virus that will
    >> bring down linux systems.
    >> Its just a matter of people sitting down and thinking about it.


    > Any system can be compromised by human error or foolishness; that is how
    > people 'hack into' government and commercial networks. They find
    > passwords, they find un-secured servers, they trick people into revealing
    > information.


    He /claims/ to have used linux, yet clearly knows little about how it
    works...or doesn't understand it. I've been hearing this kind of thing
    about linux viruses for the last /ten/ years. A more serious threat to
    linux users is a rootkit. The two things I run on my machines is Rootkit
    Hunter, & also Nmap to check security.

    >> Don't underestimate the cleverness of these hackers & virus writers.
    >> Some of them have IQs well over 160 and have devoted their lives in
    >> learning this stuff. Some are considered a threat to the world and they
    >> are banned to even be near a computer!

    >
    > Well, no government likes to made to look incompetent so knee-jerk
    > reactions are always happening. Besides, it often is illegal to access
    > a government computer without permission, so some sort of punishment is
    > inevitable.


    Up to now most governments use Windows, so his argument is proving the
    point how easy it is to crack Windows.

    >> If linux was to go into mainstream they would have a new arena to
    >> "play" in. And a new "challenge", that would make them sleepless until
    >> they found a way to bring down the systems. This is what drives them,
    >> challenge, and the knowledge
    >> that they are "masters" of computer systems.

    >
    > That would be why so many Linux and Unix servers are being 'hacked' and
    > 'crashed' all the time so that the internet hardly ever works.
    >
    >> Let me repeat. They would not sleep until they would find a way to
    >> compromise linux systems.
    >>
    >> They just don't have a reason to hit on linux systems yet. But mark my
    >> words.
    >> If Linux becomes mainstream as desktop computers, it will get viruses!


    > There are ways to compromise Linux systems; viruses are not an effective
    > approach though


    Not on linux systems, for the very reasons explained in my Message-ID:
    <>.

    Of the linux viruses/worms produced so far, none of them have been
    effective. What /may/ work on one linux distribution, won't work on
    another, & as linux distributions are patched /very/ quickly, the attack
    has soon died out.

    > - and each system has to be attacked individually, because
    > they are all different, so a kiddy can't just download a block of code and
    > plant it in a web site or spam email and sit back while thousands of
    > systems fall into his power.


    Absolutely. Unlike Windows, linux can't be knocked over by "script kiddies".

    > Instead, each victim has to be found,
    > identified, probed, analysed, and probed again and again before even
    > deciding if it is both vulnerable and worth exploiting; that takes a lot
    > of knowledge and a great deal of time and effort - just to get control of
    > *one* system.


    Exactly! That's why they attack Windows, because it's /far/ easier. Linux
    can be hardened, which makes it tougher to crack, & what's making it even
    /harder/ for crackers, is the fact that companies like Novell are
    deploying AppArmor in SuSE linux. This will be activated /by default/ in
    releases of SuSE linux 10.1 onwards. I suspect other companies will follow
    suit. "AppArmor is a Linux application security framework that provides
    mandatory access control for programs, protecting against the exploitation
    of software flaws and compromised systems. AppArmor includes everything
    you need to provide effective containment for programs (including those
    that run as root) to thwart attempted exploits and even zero-day attacks."

    Out of the top 500 supercomputers, 74% are running a form of linux. You'd
    think the crackers would be attempting to break into them with viruses! ;-)

    List of the TOP500 supercomputers operating systems:-
    Linux 74%
    Unix 20%
    Mixed 4% (Solaris, etc)
    MAC 1%
    BSD based 0.8%
    Windows 0.2%

    > The most likely way for any Linux system to become compromised starts with
    > someone gaining physical access to the machine.


    There is always a chance that someone with /physical/ access to a machine
    may be able to crack it.

    > Almost all of the Linux 'exploits' announced include phrases such as 'a
    > user could be tricked into ...' or 'a malicious user could ...'. And
    > then the bug is patched, sometimes within hours - and often in the same
    > announcement, by the person who found the flaw in the first place.


    Some facts:-
    There are over 1.2 million developers with Linux skills.
    (Evans Data Corp)

    IBM /alone/ has more than 7000 services professionals working with Linux.

    Robert Francis Group (IBM-sponsored research) found security levels in Linux
    generally exceeded those in Windows, providing a more secure and manageable
    environment out of the box with significantly more functionality in terms
    of security integration and management.

    The Linux kernel programming code is better and more secure than the
    programming code of most proprietary software - based on a four-year
    analysis of the 5.7 million lines of Linux source code conducted by
    five Stanford University researchers.


    --
    The short life and hard times of a Linux virus
    http://librenix.com/?inode=21
    Linux vs. Windows Viruses
    http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/188
     
    Seatoller, Apr 11, 2006
    #12
  13. john

    elaich Guest

    "john" <-> wrote in news:-privat.org:

    > I know more than those 4 people combined, read my reply to seatroller
    > above.


    Of course you do - that's why you came running in here and started this
    thread like you had some new, hot news. You fell for it. LMAO.
     
    elaich, Apr 11, 2006
    #13
  14. john

    Mark Warner Guest

    elaich wrote:
    > "john" <-> wrote:
    >>
    >> I know more than those 4 people combined, read my reply to seatroller
    >> above.

    >
    > Of course you do - that's why you came running in here and started
    > this thread like you had some new, hot news. You fell for it. LMAO.


    Hey, the dude knows how to use a bootloader. He is like a God to me.
    <snicker>

    --
    Mark Warner
    lose .inhibitions when replying
     
    Mark Warner, Apr 11, 2006
    #14
  15. john skrev:
    > Cross Platform Virus Created


    Oh my. You mean it is actually possible for a piece of code to inject
    itself into ELF binaries? I'm shaking!

    > http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=32744


    Why not post a link directly to the source?
    http://news.com.com/2100-1002_3-6059140.html?part=rss&tag=6059140&subj=news

    > I have said before and I am not changing this statment:
    > If linux gets as many users as windows, then viruses will be written for it
    > also.


    Viruses _are_ written for Linux or for software commonly running under
    Linux. Most of these are worms targetting poorly configured personal
    servers. SSH dictionary attacks and unpatched PHP applications are major
    attack vectors, but the number of users affected (i.e. running poorly
    configured personal servers, not the number of people actually running
    Linux) reduces the actual impact.

    > There is no OS that is immune to the stupidity of some geeks.


    No. But there is some difference in how OSes copes with this stupidity,
    and even to what extent the OS is encouraging the mentioned stupidity.
     
    Morten Skarstad, Apr 11, 2006
    #15
  16. john

    Al Klein Guest

    On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 10:21:23 +0300, "john" <-> wrote:

    >I know more than those 4 people combined, read my reply to seatroller above.


    Above? On my screen there was no post above this one in this thread,
    john. Seems as if you don't know as much as you think you do.

    But I doubt that you know as much as any one of them has forgotten.
    You "know" a lot that just isn't so, but that's not knowing.
     
    Al Klein, Apr 11, 2006
    #16
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