Linux in Consumer Electronics

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Patrick Bold, Aug 30, 2003.

  1. Patrick Bold

    Patrick Bold Guest

    BERLIN (Reuters) - Linux, the fast growing and freely available
    operating system, is set to be the software of choice for future
    televisions, set top boxes and DVD recorders, consumer electronics
    executives and specialists said Thursday.

    http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/technology/tech-tech-linux-consumerelectronics.html?th

    An excerpt:

    Low cost and the freedom to tweak the software are reasons why eight of
    the world's largest consumer electronics makers, including the numbers
    one and two Sony Corp and Matsushita of Japan, have set up an alliance
    to develop and promote Linux for consumer electronics products, last
    month.
    Linux should also create a common standard to connect products from
    different manufacturers which currently build various proprietary
    systems into their devices.

    At the sector's largest trade fair IFA in Berlin, the first Linux
    products are already on show and more will come soon, companies said.

    Linux's key advantage over other operating systems is that the core
    software is freely available and widely embraced. In the cut-throat
    electronics business where profit margins are one or two percent at the
    best of times, every saving is welcome.

    ``The consumer electronics makers sell millions of devices while their
    profit margins are extremely slim. If they have don't have to pay
    royalties it works directly through to their bottom line,'' Martin Fink,
    head of Linux activities at Hewlett-Packard, told Reuters in an
    interview.
    Patrick Bold, Aug 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Patrick Bold

    Gib Bogle Guest

    Patrick Bold wrote:
    > BERLIN (Reuters) - Linux, the fast growing and freely available
    > operating system, is set to be the software of choice for future
    > televisions, set top boxes and DVD recorders, consumer electronics
    > executives and specialists said Thursday.
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/technology/tech-tech-linux-consumerelectronics.html?th
    >
    > An excerpt:
    >
    > Low cost and the freedom to tweak the software are reasons why eight of
    > the world's largest consumer electronics makers, including the numbers
    > one and two Sony Corp and Matsushita of Japan, have set up an alliance
    > to develop and promote Linux for consumer electronics products, last
    > month.
    > Linux should also create a common standard to connect products from
    > different manufacturers which currently build various proprietary
    > systems into their devices.
    >
    > At the sector's largest trade fair IFA in Berlin, the first Linux
    > products are already on show and more will come soon, companies said.
    >
    > Linux's key advantage over other operating systems is that the core
    > software is freely available and widely embraced. In the cut-throat
    > electronics business where profit margins are one or two percent at the
    > best of times, every saving is welcome.
    >
    > ``The consumer electronics makers sell millions of devices while their
    > profit margins are extremely slim. If they have don't have to pay
    > royalties it works directly through to their bottom line,'' Martin Fink,
    > head of Linux activities at Hewlett-Packard, told Reuters in an
    > interview.


    This is the death knell for Windows CE.

    Gib
    Gib Bogle, Aug 31, 2003
    #2
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  3. Patrick Bold

    Evil Bastard Guest

    On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 05:08:44 +0000, Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:

    > FWIW, a Compaq Ipaq 3950 runs Linux far better than it runs WinCE
    > (pocketPC2003).


    It sure does!
    What a sweet little product line!

    I'm just waiting for the 802.11b-enabled iPaqs to get a bit cheaper (as
    well as 802.11b access point hardware).

    When this happens, I'll stick in a diskless Linux, and NFS-mount disks from my
    server. Will be lovely to read websites and email from a cordless iPaq.

    Also, don't put it past me to offer my neighbours a share of my Jetstart
    pipe for $5-$20/month.
    Evil Bastard, Aug 31, 2003
    #3
  4. Patrick Bold

    Gordon Guest

    On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 10:29:02 -0400, Patrick Bold wrote:

    > Linux should also create a common standard to connect products from
    > different manufacturers which currently build various proprietary
    > systems into their devices.


    This I have to see!

    --
    Gordon

    Google knows where to find things, ask at http://www.google.com
    Works for me, will work for you, so be it.
    Gordon, Aug 31, 2003
    #4
  5. On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 11:36:50 +1200, Gib Bogle wrote:


    > This is the death knell for Windows CE.


    The Gong's been sounding for a while for Windows embedded (not CE).

    There is an amazing array of consumer electronics out there _already_
    which are running embedded Linux. The manufacturers mostly choose not to
    reveal it and as the devices are not end-user-upgradeable, noone will
    usually find out.

    The latest generation of wireless routers using broadcom chipsets are the
    most public example, mainly because Linksys released firmware updates and
    it was discovered to be using a customised version of linux compiled with
    a modified GCC (which plays into GPL hands) distributed by Broadcom.


    FWIW, a Compaq Ipaq 3950 runs Linux far better than it runs WinCE
    (pocketPC2003).


    --
    There are 2 sorts of email opt-in lists:
    1: Those which can demonstrate the provenance of every subscription request.
    2: Fraud
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Aug 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Patrick Bold

    Lennier Guest

    On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 11:36:50 +1200, Gib Bogle wrote:

    > This is the death knell for Windows CE.


    Good!

    Lennier
    Lennier, Aug 31, 2003
    #6
  7. On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 17:38:57 +1200, Evil Bastard wrote:

    > I had a 3700 series with a 2-card sleeve - turned the poor thing into an
    > embarrassment ("Is that an iPaq in your pocket or are you just pleased to
    > see me?")


    Indeed, but the 6 hour battery life with wireless on is an advantage. The
    integrated ones don't last long with bluetooth or 802.11 enabled.

    > But let me define *real* bliss:
    >
    > - A slimline Linux PDA, with inbuilt GPS, GPRS, cellphone and 802.11b


    None out there.... yet. Even in Winblows.

    BTW, bluetooth, IR, SD and CF slots are tres useful on that wishlist. I
    have a 256Mb SD card slotted in to keep logging data...


    --
    There are 2 sorts of email opt-in lists:
    1: Those which can demonstrate the provenance of every subscription request.
    2: Fraud
    Uncle StoatWarbler, Aug 31, 2003
    #7
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