Linux Headed For More PCs Than Windows

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by impossible, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. impossible

    impossible Guest

    impossible, Oct 31, 2008
    #1
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  2. Hi there,

    impossible wrote:
    > Oh, wait....sorry....it's just another gimmick....some kind of "quick
    > boot" module to amuse people until the real operating system takes over.
    >
    > http://www.informationweek.com/news...icleID=211800393&subSection=Operating Systems
    >
    >
    > Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer market
    > -- as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.


    So if Windows is so marvellous why aren't Dell et al using it as
    their "quick boot" solution?

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 31, 2008
    #2
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  3. Hi there,

    Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    > Hi there,
    >
    > impossible wrote:
    >> Oh, wait....sorry....it's just another gimmick....some kind of "quick
    >> boot" module to amuse people until the real operating system takes over.
    >>
    >> http://www.informationweek.com/news...icleID=211800393&subSection=Operating Systems
    >>
    >>
    >> Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer market
    >> -- as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.

    >
    > So if Windows is so marvellous why aren't Dell et al using it as
    > their "quick boot" solution?


    Oh, that desktop I had a hard disk issue with upon installing Vista?
    The dude who purchased it a couple of days ago is going to wipe Vista
    and install Linux...next time I sell a PC I'm not gonna shell out 85
    quid for a lipstick pig OS just to make it more appealing to buyers.

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 31, 2008
    #3
  4. impossible

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Chris Wilkinson" typed:
    > Hi there,
    >
    > Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >> Hi there,
    >>
    >> impossible wrote:
    >>> Oh, wait....sorry....it's just another gimmick....some kind of
    >>> "quick boot" module to amuse people until the real operating system
    >>> takes over.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.informationweek.com/news...icleID=211800393&subSection=Operating Systems
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer
    >>> market -- as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.

    >>
    >> So if Windows is so marvellous why aren't Dell et al using it as
    >> their "quick boot" solution?

    >
    > Oh, that desktop I had a hard disk issue with upon installing Vista?
    > The dude who purchased it a couple of days ago is going to wipe Vista
    > and install Linux...


    Ouch!

    > next time I sell a PC I'm not gonna shell out 85
    > quid for a lipstick pig OS just to make it more appealing to buyers.


    Next time it might pay to quote it as-is and then give an option of paying
    extra to have Windows install disks included. (I bet nobody pays the exra.)
    That way you avoid having to sully your hands. <g>

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
    ~misfit~, Oct 31, 2008
    #4
  5. impossible

    Will Spencer Guest

    On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 11:19:34 GMT, impossible wrote:

    > Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer market --
    > as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.


    An observation.

    A few years ago (late ninties early 2000's) everyone I knew that didn't use
    Windows used Linux.

    Today everyone that I know who doesn't use Windows uses Mac, and I don't
    know wanyone who uses Linux at all, and I know more people now than I did
    back then.

    -ws

    Key/English 08 - Change We Need.

    Cool game - http://www.virtualskipper-game.com/en/
    Will Spencer, Oct 31, 2008
    #5
  6. Hi there,

    Carnations wrote:
    > On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 18:18:06 +0000, Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >
    >> Oh, that desktop I had a hard disk issue with upon installing Vista? The
    >> dude who purchased it a couple of days ago is going to wipe Vista and
    >> install Linux...next time I sell a PC I'm not gonna shell out 85 quid
    >> for a lipstick pig OS just to make it more appealing to buyers.

    >
    > Did you end up keeping Vista or give it to the buyer on the laptop?


    Laptop? I sold a desktop, but yes I did give him Vista, as it was
    installed, activated, fine-tuned etc...I already have Vista on the
    laptop, which we're keeping.

    I had to smile at the irony of going to the trouble of buying,
    and installing Vista, just to have the first person to look at
    the system buy it to install Linux...

    Damned Murphy! :)

    > If he wasn't going to use it then at least you could have it as something
    > unused on your shelf - ie you could use it but you won't. :eek:)


    I'm likely to build a desktop once we arrive back in Brisbane in
    a couple of months time, and I might spec it to play newer games
    so I'll purchase Vista for that. openSUSE 11.x will still be the
    "daily driver" OS on that machine.

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 31, 2008
    #6
  7. Hi there,

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs "Chris Wilkinson" typed:
    >> Hi there,
    >>
    >> Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >>> Hi there,
    >>>
    >>> impossible wrote:
    >>>> Oh, wait....sorry....it's just another gimmick....some kind of
    >>>> "quick boot" module to amuse people until the real operating system
    >>>> takes over.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.informationweek.com/news...icleID=211800393&subSection=Operating Systems
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer
    >>>> market -- as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.
    >>> So if Windows is so marvellous why aren't Dell et al using it as
    >>> their "quick boot" solution?

    >> Oh, that desktop I had a hard disk issue with upon installing Vista?
    >> The dude who purchased it a couple of days ago is going to wipe Vista
    >> and install Linux...

    >
    > Ouch!


    I managed to not fall over when the guy mentioned that, and
    after my blood-pressure dropped back to near-normal I think
    I even managed a wry smile.. :)

    It doesn't matter; the key thing is that I sold it before we
    left Edinburgh...

    >> next time I sell a PC I'm not gonna shell out 85
    >> quid for a lipstick pig OS just to make it more appealing to buyers.

    >
    > Next time it might pay to quote it as-is and then give an option of paying
    > extra to have Windows install disks included. (I bet nobody pays the exra.)
    > That way you avoid having to sully your hands. <g>


    I figured that the majority would consider a PC fully installed and
    ready to run with, to be a better buy - damn my logical thinking!

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Oct 31, 2008
    #7
  8. In message <CSMOk.44652$2>, Chris Wilkinson wrote:

    > openSUSE 11.x will still be the "daily driver" OS on that machine.


    You like SuSE? Never been tempted by, say, Ubuntu or Mandriva?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 1, 2008
    #8
  9. impossible

    impossible Guest

    "Chris Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    news:vSGOk.9994$2...
    > Hi there,
    >
    > impossible wrote:
    >> Oh, wait....sorry....it's just another gimmick....some kind of "quick
    >> boot" module to amuse people until the real operating system takes over.
    >>
    >> http://www.informationweek.com/news...icleID=211800393&subSection=Operating Systems
    >>
    >>
    >> Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer market
    >> -- as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.

    >
    > So if Windows is so marvellous why aren't Dell et al using it as
    > their "quick boot" solution?
    >
    >


    Windows is Dell's operating system of choice, because that's the platform
    that drives all the applications users want. You're clearly thrilled to see
    Linux get some play as a embedded gimmick piece, but really...that's pretty
    pathetic.
    impossible, Nov 1, 2008
    #9
  10. impossible

    impossible Guest

    "Chris Wilkinson" <> wrote in message
    news:uZHOk.172046$2...
    > Hi there,
    >
    > Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >> Hi there,
    >>
    >> impossible wrote:
    >>> Oh, wait....sorry....it's just another gimmick....some kind of "quick
    >>> boot" module to amuse people until the real operating system takes over.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.informationweek.com/news...icleID=211800393&subSection=Operating Systems
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Looks like Linux has finally discovered its niche in the consumer market
    >>> -- as a warm-up act for Windows. Congratulations!.

    >>
    >> So if Windows is so marvellous why aren't Dell et al using it as
    >> their "quick boot" solution?

    >
    > Oh, that desktop I had a hard disk issue with upon installing Vista?
    > The dude who purchased it a couple of days ago is going to wipe Vista
    > and install Linux...next time I sell a PC I'm not gonna shell out 85
    > quid for a lipstick pig OS just to make it more appealing to buyers.
    >


    Why would you pay 85 quid for Linux? You can download it for nothing, like
    any other giveaway piece of trash.
    impossible, Nov 1, 2008
    #10
  11. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > If Debian was RPM based, then I'd probably have considered using Debian
    > when I stopped using Mandrake or RedHat on my desktop boxen.


    Any particular reason for this attachment to RPM-based distros?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 1, 2008
    #11
  12. impossible

    Murray Symon Guest

    Carnations wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 13:37:54 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >>> openSUSE 11.x will still be the "daily driver" OS on that machine.

    >>
    >> You like SuSE? Never been tempted by, say, Ubuntu or Mandriva?

    >
    > I too like SuSE. It is an RPM based distro that is different from the
    > Fedora RPM distros. If Debian was RPM based, then I'd probably have
    > considered using Debian when I stopped using Mandrake or RedHat on my
    > desktop boxen.


    For a long time it was to Debian's advantage that it was NOT based on
    RedHat's Package Manager. Is the package manager your number one
    criteria for selecting a distro? I certainly find Debian's updates
    much faster and more efficient on resources than Suse ever was.
    Murray Symon, Nov 1, 2008
    #12
  13. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 18:39:41 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <>, Carnations wrote:
    >>
    >>> If Debian was RPM based, then I'd probably have considered using Debian
    >>> when I stopped using Mandrake or RedHat on my desktop boxen.

    >>
    >> Any particular reason for this attachment to RPM-based distros?

    >
    > Also, an RPM based distro - Mandrake - was the first one that
    > successfully installed onto the hardware I had at the time, and I suppose
    > familiarity is a factor.


    Same here, and I concentrated primarily on SuSE for a number of years. But
    still, it's worth diversifying, given the way the Linux world works.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 1, 2008
    #13
  14. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > ... and RPM skills seem to be more transportable commercially.


    Which is like saying you should stick with cars with five-speed
    transmissions, and not try any six-speed ones.

    I mean, really: skills in ONE measly command are going to weigh heavily in a
    CV?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 1, 2008
    #14
  15. impossible

    Murray Symon Guest

    Carnations wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 18:47:13 +1300, Murray Symon wrote:
    >
    >> For a long time it was to Debian's advantage that it was NOT based on
    >> RedHat's Package Manager. Is the package manager your number one
    >> criteria for selecting a distro? I certainly find Debian's updates much
    >> faster and more efficient on resources than Suse ever was.

    >
    > when was the last time you used SuSE?


    About May last year (I think it was 10.2). Admittedly I was running
    on an under specc'd machine (256MB RAM). Everything seemed to eat up
    too many bytes and machine cycles.

    > I also prefer KDE, and SuSE is, or was, the primary distro that KDE
    > colaborated with.
    >
    > That, and the fact that I'm more familiar with using the RPM than APT,
    > and RPM skills seem to be more transportable commercially.


    What skills? As far as I can see they are the basically the same:
    Step 1. update packages from online repository.
    Step 2. install packages and/or upgrade existing packages.
    All the complications seem to arise from those wanting to install
    packages not in the standard respoitory. In my personal opinion (and
    experience) you might as well just build from source in these cases.
    They are usually not in the standard repository for a good reason, the
    least of which being that no one has bothered to QA them.
    Murray Symon, Nov 1, 2008
    #15
  16. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:12:11 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <>, Carnations wrote:
    >>
    >>> ... and RPM skills seem to be more transportable commercially.

    >>
    >> Which is like saying you should stick with cars with five-speed
    >> transmissions, and not try any six-speed ones.
    >>
    >> I mean, really: skills in ONE measly command are going to weigh heavily
    >> in a CV?

    >
    > What percentage of all enterprise installations of Linux are Debian? And
    > what percentage of all enterprise installations of Linux are RedHat?


    Among my own clients, the percentage of Red Hat installations is 0.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 1, 2008
    #16
  17. In message <>, Carnations wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:10:59 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> But still, it's worth diversifying, given the way the Linux world works.

    >
    > I see no point in having to download two different distros just so that I
    > can have a different distro on each desktop box ...


    Think of it as part of your learning. If you want to maximize your job
    prospects, you're going to have to broaden your learning. Simple fact of
    life.

    > ... and I also don't see the point in having to completely blow away an
    > installation if it is working perfectly fine ...


    No need to blow it away, put the new install on a different partition.
    That's what I do when I want to try something new.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 1, 2008
    #17
  18. impossible

    Murray Symon Guest

    Carnations wrote:

    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:25:26 +1300, Murray Symon wrote:
    >
    >> What skills? As far as I can see they are the basically the same:
    >> Step 1. update packages from online repository. Step 2. install
    >> packages and/or upgrade existing packages.
    >> All the complications seem to arise from those wanting to install
    >> packages not in the standard respoitory. In my personal opinion (and
    >> experience) you might as well just build from source in these cases.
    >> They are usually not in the standard repository for a good reason, the
    >> least of which being that no one has bothered to QA them.

    >
    > And that is the REAL reason why the version of Kaffeine that is shipped
    > with SuSE cannot play MP3s and why you cannot install the CSS decrypting
    > library, or the current stable version of RoseGarden instead of the one
    > that was current only up to 6 weeks before the distro shipped.
    >
    > Yeah right!


    However, installing the latest "stable" version of any single package may
    not result in a stable system, due to dependencies and inter-dependencies
    with other packages. This is what separates Debian "stable" from Debian
    "testing". You can make that choice without resorting to third party
    repositories, based on your own requirements. I prefer "stable".

    OpenSuse (when I was using it, circa 10.1/10.2) did not seem to embrace
    the concept of releasing a stable release. There always seemed to be many
    unresolved issues, even with the standard base. At that time they seemed
    to be in transition from one packaging system to another and it wasn't
    clear what was the correct (or best) one to use: YAST, YUM, Smart, et al.
    Have they sorted that out now?

    Murray.
    Murray Symon, Nov 1, 2008
    #18
  19. Hi there,

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <CSMOk.44652$2>, Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >
    >> openSUSE 11.x will still be the "daily driver" OS on that machine.

    >
    > You like SuSE? Never been tempted by, say, Ubuntu or Mandriva?


    I do like it. I'm not a fan of Gnome, so Ubuntu is out although I
    have tested Kubuntu. I've also used Mandrake and Fedora in the past,
    and sporadically I'll test other distros in VMplayer.

    I've never had a major gripe with any of the distros I've used, but
    openSUSE I've liked more than the others. openSUSE 11 has only been
    on the laptop for a few days now, and already I'm impressed with a
    number of aspects, particularly the revitalized software installer,
    which takes much less time to initialize than its predecessor on
    openSUSE 10.3.

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Nov 1, 2008
    #19
  20. Hi there,

    Carnations wrote:
    > On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 13:37:54 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >>> openSUSE 11.x will still be the "daily driver" OS on that machine.

    >> You like SuSE? Never been tempted by, say, Ubuntu or Mandriva?

    >
    > I too like SuSE. It is an RPM based distro that is different from the
    > Fedora RPM distros. If Debian was RPM based, then I'd probably have
    > considered using Debian when I stopped using Mandrake or RedHat on my
    > desktop boxen.


    I'm not bothered about whether its rpm, deb, or another package format
    so long as the distros package manager is simple and efficient. The
    yast package manager in the past has suffered from slow initialization
    and a dependency solver that can trip up sometimes. It was my biggest
    gripe about openSUSE 10.3, but now with openSUSE 11 I'll have to find
    something else to gripe about... :)

    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Edinburgh.
    Chris Wilkinson, Nov 1, 2008
    #20
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