linux fc4 a quick look....

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Nova, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Nova

    Nova Guest

    I decided to have a quick look at linux today after reading many people
    write how easy it has become. I use windows normally though am forced
    to use many *nix boxes at work for development but that is all from the
    command shell. I was curious to see what a desktop environment was like
    in linux compared to windows...

    I installed fedora core 4, the installer was pretty straight forward,
    had no problems picking up my hardware which is all pretty old hardware
    now and very standard in this particular box. i do like it how all the
    installation questions are asked at the start and then no more are
    needed and only one reboot at the end of installation.. Where as in
    windows the installation is interupted at times for network questions,
    region questions, user setup questions etc etc.

    Anyway so I look at the desktop in Fedora (kde), it's quite nice...

    The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    distribution.

    The linux installation instructions..

    "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:

    tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz

    This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."

    Now compare this to windows..

    "Double click the Firefox Setup 1.5.exe installer to start the install."


    Hmmm, seems it is a lot easier on windows,, double clicking with a mouse
    or just clicking open at the end of the download.. compared to having
    to open a shell, nagigate in the shell to the location that the browser
    saved it in (which probably the majority of computer users will have no
    idea where their browser saved it in).
    Of course they would need to know the cd commands to change directory..
    Then they have to manually uncompress the binary and decide where to put
    that directory...

    Anyway it just seemed strange that the first thing I went to do seemed
    no where near as straight forward as what was required on windows and
    for the majority of people that would be where it ends..

    I then decided to run the auto software updater, I ran it, it asked for
    the root password which i entered, it then sat there doing nothing for
    the next 10 minutes.. wonderful..

    Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..
     
    Nova, Jan 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. Nova

    Shane Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:13:49 +1300, Nova wrote:

    > I decided to have a quick look at linux today after reading many people
    > write how easy it has become. I use windows normally though am forced to
    > use many *nix boxes at work for development but that is all from the
    > command shell. I was curious to see what a desktop environment was like
    > in linux compared to windows...
    >
    > I installed fedora core 4, the installer was pretty straight forward, had
    > no problems picking up my hardware which is all pretty old hardware now
    > and very standard in this particular box. i do like it how all the
    > installation questions are asked at the start and then no more are needed
    > and only one reboot at the end of installation.. Where as in windows the
    > installation is interupted at times for network questions, region
    > questions, user setup questions etc etc.
    >
    > Anyway so I look at the desktop in Fedora (kde), it's quite nice...
    >
    > The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to version
    > 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux distribution.
    >
    > The linux installation instructions..
    >
    > "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >
    > tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >
    > This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >
    > Now compare this to windows..
    >
    > "Double click the Firefox Setup 1.5.exe installer to start the install."
    >
    >
    > Hmmm, seems it is a lot easier on windows,, double clicking with a mouse
    > or just clicking open at the end of the download.. compared to having to
    > open a shell, nagigate in the shell to the location that the browser saved
    > it in (which probably the majority of computer users will have no idea
    > where their browser saved it in). Of course they would need to know the cd
    > commands to change directory.. Then they have to manually uncompress the
    > binary and decide where to put that directory...
    >
    > Anyway it just seemed strange that the first thing I went to do seemed no
    > where near as straight forward as what was required on windows and for the
    > majority of people that would be where it ends..
    >
    > I then decided to run the auto software updater, I ran it, it asked for
    > the root password which i entered, it then sat there doing nothing for the
    > next 10 minutes.. wonderful..
    >
    > Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    > favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    > upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..


    weird.. double clicking the tarball on linux should have bought up
    StuffIt or something similar (kind of like winrar or winzip et al)

    and cd works on windows as well, if I can remember the dagnabbit path

    --
    Why is it that we rejoice at a birth and grieve at a funeral? It is because we
    are not the person involved.
    -- Mark Twain, "Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar"
     
    Shane, Jan 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Nova

    David Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:13:49 +1300, Nova wrote:
    >
    >> I decided to have a quick look at linux today after reading many people
    >> write how easy it has become. I use windows normally though am forced to
    >> use many *nix boxes at work for development but that is all from the
    >> command shell. I was curious to see what a desktop environment was like
    >> in linux compared to windows...
    >>
    >> I installed fedora core 4, the installer was pretty straight forward, had
    >> no problems picking up my hardware which is all pretty old hardware now
    >> and very standard in this particular box. i do like it how all the
    >> installation questions are asked at the start and then no more are needed
    >> and only one reboot at the end of installation.. Where as in windows the
    >> installation is interupted at times for network questions, region
    >> questions, user setup questions etc etc.
    >>
    >> Anyway so I look at the desktop in Fedora (kde), it's quite nice...
    >>
    >> The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to version
    >> 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux distribution.
    >>
    >> The linux installation instructions..
    >>
    >> "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >>
    >> tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >>
    >> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >>
    >> Now compare this to windows..
    >>
    >> "Double click the Firefox Setup 1.5.exe installer to start the install."
    >>
    >>
    >> Hmmm, seems it is a lot easier on windows,, double clicking with a mouse
    >> or just clicking open at the end of the download.. compared to having to
    >> open a shell, nagigate in the shell to the location that the browser saved
    >> it in (which probably the majority of computer users will have no idea
    >> where their browser saved it in). Of course they would need to know the cd
    >> commands to change directory.. Then they have to manually uncompress the
    >> binary and decide where to put that directory...
    >>
    >> Anyway it just seemed strange that the first thing I went to do seemed no
    >> where near as straight forward as what was required on windows and for the
    >> majority of people that would be where it ends..
    >>
    >> I then decided to run the auto software updater, I ran it, it asked for
    >> the root password which i entered, it then sat there doing nothing for the
    >> next 10 minutes.. wonderful..
    >>
    >> Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    >> favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    >> upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..

    >
    > weird.. double clicking the tarball on linux should have bought up
    > StuffIt or something similar (kind of like winrar or winzip et al)
    >
    > and cd works on windows as well, if I can remember the dagnabbit path
    >


    'cd' works on windows, but for upgrading firefox, there is no need to
    use it.

    The difficulty installing software is also one of the reasons I don't
    use linux. If your distribution doesn't include a package you want, and
    the author does not provide binaries for your distribution, you can look
    forward to hours of installing compilers, building stuff, deciphering
    C++ error messages, hunting out dependancies, etc. (Yes i know it's not
    always this hard, automake/conf does a good job, sometimes.)

    But for even an advanced user, this is absurd. If you aren't planning on
    developing or modifying a program, there is no reason to compile, or
    even download its source code. I understand the difficulties created by
    the flexibility of linux, the different file locations, available
    libraries etc, on windows the developer can assume everything is there
    and if he uses any extra libraries etc, he can distribute them with his
    software and know it will work.

    <IMHO>
    I think what linux distros need is a standard for creating applications,
    specifying standard libraries that will always be available, providing
    everything the average application needs, including GUI libraries, C/C++
    standard libraries etc, then combine this with a standardised, but
    flexible installation system, like .msi on windows. RPM/deb is good for
    what it does, but it is nice to be able to choose some settings etc
    while installing the way you can on windows.
    Updating could be automatic, but the developer would control updates (I
    see no reason to get your software from a third party, ie. your distro,
    except for critical/system/distro-specific stuff)

    Of course this standardisation would never please every developer, they
    would find a way to complain about everything, but not using it would be
    their loss; users would not bother installing their software.

    Java/.NET/mono provide this to some extent, look at the success of
    Azureus on linux, however they are not suitable for everything (it's
    alright to have azureus running when all the other software you use is
    relatively lean, but imagine 10 different java apps running using
    resources in a similar fashion to azureus)
    </IMHO>
     
    David, Jan 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Nova

    Gordon Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:13:49 +1300, Nova wrote:

    > Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    > favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    > upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..


    Ironically, I never have to get to the command line to update Firefox,
    a window just come up saying the next update is ready. Do you wish to do
    this now?

    All far too much like MS for my ease of mind.

    And yes, the comand line is all powerful, know the command, issue it. It
    will be done, often to the GUI's bewilderment.

    GUI is good, to a point.
     
    Gordon, Jan 24, 2006
    #4
  5. Nova

    Enkidu Guest

    Nova wrote:
    >
    > The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    > version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    > distribution.
    >
    > The linux installation instructions..
    >
    > "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >
    > tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >
    > This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >

    Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    tarball? Back to Windows with you!!

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 24, 2006
    #5
  6. Nova

    Peter Guest

    Enkidu wrote:

    >> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >>

    > Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    > tarball? Back to Windows with you!!
    >


    Hey, Cliff, this is not nz.politics we should be kind and gentle to those
    feeling their way with Linux.
     
    Peter, Jan 24, 2006
    #6
  7. Nova

    Enkidu Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >>> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."

    >>
    >> Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    >> tarball? Back to Windows with you!!

    >
    > Hey, Cliff, this is not nz.politics we should be kind and gentle to
    > those feeling their way with Linux.
    >

    Bugger that! Before we'd know it EVERY linux machine would have a GUI.

    Repel the invaders, I say! Keep linux pure!

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 24, 2006
    #7
  8. Nova

    Nova Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Nova wrote:
    >>
    >> The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    >> version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    >> distribution.
    >>
    >> The linux installation instructions..
    >>
    >> "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >>
    >> tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >>
    >> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >>

    > Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    > tarball?


    The first think I did was read the firefox instructions.
    I did also try using the updater in the distro which didn't work.

    Back to Windows with you!!

    Definitely :)

    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff
     
    Nova, Jan 24, 2006
    #8
  9. Nova

    Enkidu Guest

    Nova wrote:
    > Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >> Nova wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    >>> version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    >>> distribution.
    >>>
    >>> The linux installation instructions..
    >>>
    >>> "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >>>
    >>> tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >>>
    >>> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >>>

    >> Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    >> tarball?

    >
    > The first think I did was read the firefox instructions.
    > I did also try using the updater in the distro which didn't work.
    >

    Which really means that *you* failed to get it to work.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 24, 2006
    #9
  10. Nova

    steve Guest

    Nova wrote:

    > Anyway it just seemed strange that the first thing I went to do seemed
    > no where near as straight forward as what was required on windows and
    > for the majority of people that would be where it ends..
    >
    > I then decided to run the auto software updater, I ran it, it asked for
    > the root password which i entered, it then sat there doing nothing for
    > the next 10 minutes.. wonderful..
    >
    > Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    > favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    > upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..


    Linux is best updated using packages for the distro concerned.

    For Fedora Core, you would use a *.rpm file.

    That you could just double-click on and it would install the software.

    For other distros, like Debian, you would double-click on a *.deb file.

    The beauty of the system used in Debian is that if the package you want to
    install needs some OTHER files not currently installed in order to run
    properly, it will get those packages, too, and install them all in the
    right order as well.

    But to go to mozilla.org and download the generic Linux install file
    intended for all distros and not part of any package management scheme,
    then, yes....you do have to make yourself root and run the executable.

    The "tar" thing is just to extract the install files from the compressed
    archive they were downloaded in.

    On my Xandros systems, I just right-click on the tar file in the File
    Manager and select "extract all" from the pop-up menu.

    Then pasting the "sh <filename of install-bin>" into a shell command prompt
    and pressing enter isn't hard......
     
    steve, Jan 24, 2006
    #10
  11. Nova

    steve Guest

    David wrote:

    > The difficulty installing software is also one of the reasons I don't
    > use linux.


    It used to be a hassle.

    Where it remains a problem is in new software under active development. It
    hasn't been "polished" yet.....

    But these days it is easily avoided for most desktop PC users.

    The major Linux distros come with everything - OS and apps - already there.
     
    steve, Jan 24, 2006
    #11
  12. Nova

    steve Guest

    Enkidu wrote:

    > Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    > tarball? Back to Windows with you!!


    To be fair, it was Firefox.......

    But I have to admit, the same thing went through my mind. :)
     
    steve, Jan 24, 2006
    #12
  13. Nova

    JC Guest

    Nova wrote:
    > I decided to have a quick look at linux today after reading many people
    > write how easy it has become. I use windows normally though am forced
    > to use many *nix boxes at work for development but that is all from the
    > command shell. I was curious to see what a desktop environment was like
    > in linux compared to windows...
    >
    > I installed fedora core 4, the installer was pretty straight forward,
    > had no problems picking up my hardware which is all pretty old hardware
    > now and very standard in this particular box. i do like it how all the
    > installation questions are asked at the start and then no more are
    > needed and only one reboot at the end of installation.. Where as in
    > windows the installation is interupted at times for network questions,
    > region questions, user setup questions etc etc.
    >
    > Anyway so I look at the desktop in Fedora (kde), it's quite nice...
    >
    > The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    > version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    > distribution.
    >
    > The linux installation instructions..
    >
    > "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >
    > tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >
    > This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >
    > Now compare this to windows..
    >
    > "Double click the Firefox Setup 1.5.exe installer to start the install."
    >
    >
    > Hmmm, seems it is a lot easier on windows,, double clicking with a mouse
    > or just clicking open at the end of the download.. compared to having
    > to open a shell, nagigate in the shell to the location that the browser
    > saved it in (which probably the majority of computer users will have no
    > idea where their browser saved it in).
    > Of course they would need to know the cd commands to change directory..
    > Then they have to manually uncompress the binary and decide where to put
    > that directory...
    >
    > Anyway it just seemed strange that the first thing I went to do seemed
    > no where near as straight forward as what was required on windows and
    > for the majority of people that would be where it ends..
    >
    > I then decided to run the auto software updater, I ran it, it asked for
    > the root password which i entered, it then sat there doing nothing for
    > the next 10 minutes.. wonderful..
    >
    > Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    > favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    > upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..


    I agree. I installed Ubuntu the other day. I like it except for the fact
    that you have to use command line stuff. I couldnt get it to install
    Thunderbird and it kept asking for something about repositories (sp?)
    If you could just doubleclick and not have to do command line stuff, I
    would make it my fulltime OS. Until they sort it out, I will just leave
    it on my pc as a dual boot option.
     
    JC, Jan 24, 2006
    #13
  14. Nova

    steve Guest

    Enkidu wrote:

    > Which really means that *you* failed to get it to work.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff


    Windows users don't own their machines or accept responsibility for them in
    the same way Linux users are used to.

    :)
     
    steve, Jan 24, 2006
    #14
  15. Nova

    Shane Guest

    On Wed, 25 Jan 2006 09:06:50 +1300, JC wrote:

    > I agree. I installed Ubuntu the other day. I like it except for the fact
    > that you have to use command line stuff. I couldnt get it to install
    > Thunderbird and it kept asking for something about repositories (sp?) If
    > you could just doubleclick and not have to do command line stuff, I would
    > make it my fulltime OS. Until they sort it out, I will just leave it on
    > my pc as a dual boot option.


    synaptic is your friend
    Start | System | Synaptic
    If your repositories are borked, you will need to edit them, with
    something like gedit or kwrite (run as root or sudo)
    /etc/apt/sources.list

    (There are a couple of threads on this NG about the problem)
    hth
    --
    A sine curve goes off to infinity, or at least the end of the blackboard.
    -- Prof. Steiner
     
    Shane, Jan 24, 2006
    #15
  16. Nova

    Nova Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Nova wrote:
    >> Enkidu wrote:
    >>
    >>> Nova wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    >>>> version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    >>>> distribution.
    >>>>
    >>>> The linux installation instructions..
    >>>>
    >>>> "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install
    >>>> Firefox:
    >>>>
    >>>> tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >>>>
    >>>> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >>>>
    >>> Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    >>> tarball?

    >>
    >> The first think I did was read the firefox instructions.
    >> I did also try using the updater in the distro which didn't work.
    >>

    > Which really means that *you* failed to get it to work.


    Yes I failed to get it to work, a default installation in which the
    network was going perfectly and clicking on check for updates did NADA.
    When I clicked for updates it asked for the root password I entered
    it, and then it did nothing.. I am not sure what more was required on
    my behalf, obviously the network was setup correctly as I could connect
    to other machines and the internet..

    As it sat there for 10 minutes without giving any indication of doing
    anything either it doesn't work, or the error reporting is absolutely
    horrid (non existant).

    Either way, it didn't work and so my first impressions aren't great of
    FC4 :).

    Cheers!

    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff
     
    Nova, Jan 24, 2006
    #16
  17. Nova

    Nova Guest

    steve wrote:
    > Nova wrote:
    >
    >> Anyway it just seemed strange that the first thing I went to do seemed
    >> no where near as straight forward as what was required on windows and
    >> for the majority of people that would be where it ends..
    >>
    >> I then decided to run the auto software updater, I ran it, it asked for
    >> the root password which i entered, it then sat there doing nothing for
    >> the next 10 minutes.. wonderful..
    >>
    >> Anyway as it is free it is still pretty cool but due to the lack of me
    >> favourite software being on the OS and having to go into the shell to
    >> upgrade a program seems i am not missing much really..

    >
    > Linux is best updated using packages for the distro concerned.
    >
    > For Fedora Core, you would use a *.rpm file.
    >
    > That you could just double-click on and it would install the software.
    >
    > For other distros, like Debian, you would double-click on a *.deb file.
    >
    > The beauty of the system used in Debian is that if the package you want to
    > install needs some OTHER files not currently installed in order to run
    > properly, it will get those packages, too, and install them all in the
    > right order as well.
    >
    > But to go to mozilla.org and download the generic Linux install file
    > intended for all distros and not part of any package management scheme,
    > then, yes....you do have to make yourself root and run the executable.
    >
    > The "tar" thing is just to extract the install files from the compressed
    > archive they were downloaded in.
    >
    > On my Xandros systems, I just right-click on the tar file in the File
    > Manager and select "extract all" from the pop-up menu.
    >
    > Then pasting the "sh <filename of install-bin>" into a shell command prompt
    > and pressing enter isn't hard......
    >
    >


    hi, yeah I am aware you can use RPM's but was more just trying to follow
    the instructions of the vendor which I assume most people would if they
    are on a new OS for the first time, and following the instructions at
    firefox, it gave no information about using the distro's own updating
    systems or installers, most windows users are used to either having an
    autoupdater in the vendors software, or just going to the webpage and
    downloading a new installation which they then just click open and it
    updates the installed software.. This is perhaps just poor
    documentation at firefox or lack of thought.

    Unfortunately in this case the distro's own updater wasn't working and I
    really couldn't be bothered wasting time finding out why. I am going to
    try Ubantu next as have heard that is a pretty well packaged distro.

    thanks for the reply, one thing that linux does have going for it is
    that most of the people that use it are enthusiasts so support is
    generally pretty good and free :).
     
    Nova, Jan 24, 2006
    #17
  18. Nova

    Nova Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Nova wrote:
    >>
    >> The first thing I decide to do is upgrade firefox on the system to
    >> version 1.5. i browse to the firefox website and download the linux
    >> distribution.
    >>
    >> The linux installation instructions..
    >>
    >> "Extract the tarball in the directory where you want to install Firefox:
    >>
    >> tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.tar.gz
    >>
    >> This will create a firefox subdirectory of that directory."
    >>

    > Duh! You install a distro and the FIRST thing you do is install a
    > tarball? Back to Windows with you!!
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff


    No, you didn't read, I merely pointed out that is what the vendors
    instructions say to do, but thanks for people so helpful anyway, always
    good to get helpful advise from people like yourself.

    Cheers!
     
    Nova, Jan 24, 2006
    #18
  19. Nova

    Chris Hope Guest

    Nova wrote:

    [snip]

    > I am going to try Ubantu next as have heard that is a pretty well
    > packaged distro.


    One you might want to also try is Mepis. It's a Debian based distro on
    one cd that works as a live cd which you can choose to install if you
    want once you have it going. I've had a couple of customers try loads
    and loads of distros and for both of them Mepis turned out to be their
    favourite.

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
     
    Chris Hope, Jan 24, 2006
    #19
  20. Nova

    steve Guest

    Nova wrote:

    > hi, yeah I am aware you can use RPM's but was more just trying to follow
    > the instructions of the vendor which I assume most people would if they
    > are on a new OS for the first time, and following the instructions at
    > firefox, it gave no information about using the distro's own updating
    > systems or installers, most windows users are used to either having an
    > autoupdater in the vendors software, or just going to the webpage and
    > downloading a new installation which they then just click open and it
    > updates the installed software.. This is perhaps just poor
    > documentation at firefox or lack of thought.


    You do raise an interesting point. With the better Linux distros today, they
    do tend to be the source for most software.....via their package management
    system.

    This IS a bit different to Windows where - aside from MS software - you
    would get software from someone else....though usually in a self-extracting
    executable "setup.exe".......and hope you manage to keep each 'setup.exe'
    in a meaningful named folder.

    :)

    > Unfortunately in this case the distro's own updater wasn't working and I
    > really couldn't be bothered wasting time finding out why. I am going to
    > try Ubantu next as have heard that is a pretty well packaged distro.


    I used to be a die-hard Red Hat user......but their move to Fedora Core put
    me off and I haven't gone back after trying FC2 and 3. I didn't bother with
    4.

    There are now better distros out there with more reliable sources of
    updates.

    > thanks for the reply, one thing that linux does have going for it is
    > that most of the people that use it are enthusiasts so support is
    > generally pretty good and free :).


    Ta. Glad to help.....if it was any.
     
    steve, Jan 25, 2006
    #20
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