Linksys wireless router

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Andy Mann, Jul 2, 2005.

  1. Andy Mann

    Andy Mann Guest

    I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    router.
    How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    Andy Mann, Jul 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote in message
    news:mzCxe.17151$...
    >I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    > router.
    > How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >

    RTFM. STFW.

    Or maybe post the *model* here? Without knowing that, it would be kind of
    hard to say, wouldn't it?
    Toolman Tim, Jul 2, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Andy Mann

    Guest

    On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:

    |>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    |>router.
    |>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    |>

    LOL, the jerk told you?

    In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there

    If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    number is the first one under Gateway.
    --
    Never argue with an idiot.
    They drag you down to their level,
    then beat you with experience......
    , Jul 2, 2005
    #3
  4. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >
    > |>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    > |>router.
    > |>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    > |>
    >
    > LOL, the jerk told you?
    >
    > In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    > edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >
    > If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    > number is the first one under Gateway.
    >

    Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he needs
    to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific MAC
    addresses. I did both.
    Toolman Tim, Jul 2, 2005
    #4
  5. Andy Mann

    FML Guest

    Andy Mann wrote:
    > I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    > router.
    > How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >
    >

    Read your router manual. Focus on security. You will see things like WEP
    (and maybe WPA depending on how old your router is). Depending on how
    computer savvy your neighbor is, WEP alone may keep him out but it can
    be cracked in a matter of minutes by someone that knows what they are doing.

    Here is an excellent article about wi-fi security:

    http://www.windowssecrets.com/comp/050526/#story1

    Hopefully you don't have to have a Windows Secrets account to view it.
    If they ask you to log in, IMHO it is well worth it to sign up. Brian
    Livingston's biweekly columns are easy to read and full of helpful
    information and you can't beat the price (free) or their privacy policy.
    FML, Jul 2, 2005
    #5
  6. Andy Mann

    FML Guest

    Toolman Tim wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >>|>router.
    >>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>|>
    >>
    >>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>
    >>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>
    >>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>

    >
    > Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    > around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he needs
    > to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific MAC
    > addresses. I did both.
    >
    >
    >

    If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption
    and MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users.
    Anybody with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little bit
    of time to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a matter of
    minutes.

    You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN" at:

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    FML, Jul 2, 2005
    #6
  7. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "FML" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > Toolman Tim wrote:
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >>>|>router.
    >>>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>|>
    >>>
    >>>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>
    >>>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>
    >>>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >> around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >> needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific
    >> MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption and
    > MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users. Anybody
    > with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little bit of time
    > to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a matter of minutes.
    >
    > You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN" at:
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    >

    In my neighborhood, I'm not worried. My wireless signal doesn't even make it
    to the fence posts, much less far enough out for someone to steal Internet
    bandwidth. (I don't have WPA on my old-dog laptop.)

    But that doesn't seem to be the case for the OP. However, I seriously doubt
    his neighbor is going to learn how to crack his WEP. If his has WPA, that's
    even better.
    Toolman Tim, Jul 2, 2005
    #7
  8. Andy Mann

    FML Guest

    Toolman Tim wrote:
    > "FML" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:...
    >
    >>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>
    >>><> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >>>>|>router.
    >>>>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>>|>
    >>>>
    >>>>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>>
    >>>>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>>>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>>
    >>>>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>>>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >>>around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >>>needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific
    >>>MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption and
    >>MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users. Anybody
    >>with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little bit of time
    >>to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a matter of minutes.
    >>
    >>You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN" at:
    >>
    >>http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    >>

    >
    > In my neighborhood, I'm not worried. My wireless signal doesn't even make it
    > to the fence posts, much less far enough out for someone to steal Internet
    > bandwidth. (I don't have WPA on my old-dog laptop.)
    >
    > But that doesn't seem to be the case for the OP. However, I seriously doubt
    > his neighbor is going to learn how to crack his WEP. If his has WPA, that's
    > even better.
    >
    >
    >

    Sounds like you're like me. I live out in the middle of no-where. The
    closest neighbor is 1/4 mile away. I don't even have WEP enabled on
    mine. If somebody wants to come all the way out here and try to get
    close enough to my house (after dealing with an electric gate and a pack
    of very rambunctious doggies), they can go ahead and piggy back onto my
    wifi.

    At the office, it is another story altogether. Full blown WPA2 there.
    FML, Jul 2, 2005
    #8
  9. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "FML" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Toolman Tim wrote:
    >> "FML" <> wrote in message
    >> news:eek:...
    >>
    >>>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>>
    >>>><> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my
    >>>>>wireless
    >>>>>|>router.
    >>>>>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>>>|>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>>>>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>>>
    >>>>>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>>>>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >>>>around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >>>>needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific
    >>>>MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption and
    >>>MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users. Anybody
    >>>with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little bit of time
    >>>to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a matter of minutes.
    >>>
    >>>You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN" at:
    >>>
    >>>http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    >>>

    >>
    >> In my neighborhood, I'm not worried. My wireless signal doesn't even make
    >> it to the fence posts, much less far enough out for someone to steal
    >> Internet bandwidth. (I don't have WPA on my old-dog laptop.)
    >>
    >> But that doesn't seem to be the case for the OP. However, I seriously
    >> doubt his neighbor is going to learn how to crack his WEP. If his has
    >> WPA, that's even better.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Sounds like you're like me. I live out in the middle of no-where. The
    > closest neighbor is 1/4 mile away. I don't even have WEP enabled on mine.
    > If somebody wants to come all the way out here and try to get close enough
    > to my house (after dealing with an electric gate and a pack of very
    > rambunctious doggies), they can go ahead and piggy back onto my wifi.
    >
    > At the office, it is another story altogether. Full blown WPA2 there.
    >

    Yeah - we haven't done wireless at work for two reasons: our environment is
    bad (significant electrical interference from milling equipment, and metal
    siding on all the buildings - we'd have to go with antennae towers and good
    line-of-sight) and cost vs. advantage. To get wi-fi to the outer limits of
    our plant offices would cost significantly higher than normal because of the
    environment, and wouldn't improve productivity enough to justify it.
    Toolman Tim, Jul 2, 2005
    #9
  10. Andy Mann

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Andy Mann wrote:

    > I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    > router.
    > How do I put a password on my system to stop it


    You cannot put a psw on it.

    If the router has a MAC blocking feature, then enable it to block other
    wireless machines from using your network but the ones you want.

    http://compnetworking.about.com/od/wirelesssecurity/tp/wifisecurity.htm

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jul 2, 2005
    #10
  11. Andy Mann

    FML Guest

    Toolman Tim wrote:
    > "FML" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>
    >>>"FML" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:eek:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>><> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my
    >>>>>>wireless
    >>>>>>|>router.
    >>>>>>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>>>>|>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>>>>>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>>>>>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >>>>>around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >>>>>needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific
    >>>>>MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption and
    >>>>MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users. Anybody
    >>>>with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little bit of time
    >>>>to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a matter of minutes.
    >>>>
    >>>>You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN" at:
    >>>>
    >>>>http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>In my neighborhood, I'm not worried. My wireless signal doesn't even make
    >>>it to the fence posts, much less far enough out for someone to steal
    >>>Internet bandwidth. (I don't have WPA on my old-dog laptop.)
    >>>
    >>>But that doesn't seem to be the case for the OP. However, I seriously
    >>>doubt his neighbor is going to learn how to crack his WEP. If his has
    >>>WPA, that's even better.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Sounds like you're like me. I live out in the middle of no-where. The
    >>closest neighbor is 1/4 mile away. I don't even have WEP enabled on mine.
    >>If somebody wants to come all the way out here and try to get close enough
    >>to my house (after dealing with an electric gate and a pack of very
    >>rambunctious doggies), they can go ahead and piggy back onto my wifi.
    >>
    >>At the office, it is another story altogether. Full blown WPA2 there.
    >>

    >
    > Yeah - we haven't done wireless at work for two reasons: our environment is
    > bad (significant electrical interference from milling equipment, and metal
    > siding on all the buildings - we'd have to go with antennae towers and good
    > line-of-sight) and cost vs. advantage. To get wi-fi to the outer limits of
    > our plant offices would cost significantly higher than normal because of the
    > environment, and wouldn't improve productivity enough to justify it.
    >
    >
    >

    I don'thave that problem. I own a small business and our "Global
    Headquarters" are in less than 2,500 sqft of office space, LOL.
    The only hardwire is to the servers, everything else is wifi. Works well
    for our little space.
    FML, Jul 2, 2005
    #11
  12. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "FML" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Toolman Tim wrote:
    >> "FML" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"FML" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:eek:...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>><> wrote in message
    >>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my
    >>>>>>>wireless
    >>>>>>>|>router.
    >>>>>>>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>>>>>|>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>>>>>>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>>>>>>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >>>>>>around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >>>>>>needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to
    >>>>>>specific MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption
    >>>>>and MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users.
    >>>>>Anybody with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little
    >>>>>bit of time to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a
    >>>>>matter of minutes.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN"
    >>>>>at:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>In my neighborhood, I'm not worried. My wireless signal doesn't even
    >>>>make it to the fence posts, much less far enough out for someone to
    >>>>steal Internet bandwidth. (I don't have WPA on my old-dog laptop.)
    >>>>
    >>>>But that doesn't seem to be the case for the OP. However, I seriously
    >>>>doubt his neighbor is going to learn how to crack his WEP. If his has
    >>>>WPA, that's even better.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Sounds like you're like me. I live out in the middle of no-where. The
    >>>closest neighbor is 1/4 mile away. I don't even have WEP enabled on mine.
    >>>If somebody wants to come all the way out here and try to get close
    >>>enough to my house (after dealing with an electric gate and a pack of
    >>>very rambunctious doggies), they can go ahead and piggy back onto my
    >>>wifi.
    >>>
    >>>At the office, it is another story altogether. Full blown WPA2 there.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yeah - we haven't done wireless at work for two reasons: our environment
    >> is bad (significant electrical interference from milling equipment, and
    >> metal siding on all the buildings - we'd have to go with antennae towers
    >> and good line-of-sight) and cost vs. advantage. To get wi-fi to the outer
    >> limits of our plant offices would cost significantly higher than normal
    >> because of the environment, and wouldn't improve productivity enough to
    >> justify it.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > I don'thave that problem. I own a small business and our "Global
    > Headquarters" are in less than 2,500 sqft of office space, LOL.
    > The only hardwire is to the servers, everything else is wifi. Works well
    > for our little space.
    >

    That is nice - and I would agree that office installations need the higher
    security.

    When I started in the office at our plant, we were Arcnet (coax) and I think
    it wasn't even star topology. I was always having to replace cards in the
    286/386 systems, and repair coax connections. It didn't take me long to get
    them to switch to CAT3 10-baseT ethernet. And only two or three years after
    that we went to CAT5. Now, our three primary servers have gigabit
    capabilities, but my switches and fiberoptics between them would all have to
    be replaced, and the wiring in one complex isn't up to spec for it either. I
    bet in the next year or so the boss will let me contract someone to replace
    the CAT5 infrastructure. Now that I'm a few years older, I don't want to do
    the wiring again myself <g>
    Toolman Tim, Jul 2, 2005
    #12
  13. Andy Mann

    doS Guest

    why not disable broadcast sid, who needs a manual?

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:HDCxe.22914$...
    >
    > "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote in message
    > news:mzCxe.17151$...
    >>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >> router.
    >> How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>

    > RTFM. STFW.
    >
    > Or maybe post the *model* here? Without knowing that, it would be kind of
    > hard to say, wouldn't it?
    >
    >
    >
    doS, Jul 3, 2005
    #13
  14. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    Well, he'd need a manual (or Internet search, etc.) to know *how* to do
    that. Plus, since the neighbor in question already knows the SID, that
    probably isn't going to stop him either.

    "doS" <> wrote in message
    news:JlFxe.7059$...
    > why not disable broadcast sid, who needs a manual?
    >
    > "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    > news:HDCxe.22914$...
    >>
    >> "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote in message
    >> news:mzCxe.17151$...
    >>>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >>> router.
    >>> How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>

    >> RTFM. STFW.
    >>
    >> Or maybe post the *model* here? Without knowing that, it would be kind of
    >> hard to say, wouldn't it?
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Toolman Tim, Jul 3, 2005
    #14
  15. Andy Mann

    pcbutts1 Guest

    Better yet have a little fun with him. Set up access time limits and watch
    the look on his face when it turns off.

    --


    The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    NEW Embedded system W/Linux. We now sell DVR cards.
    See it all at http://www.seedsv.com/products.htm
    Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com



    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:ZMCxe.22928$...
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> |>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >> |>router.
    >> |>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >> |>
    >>
    >> LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>
    >> In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >> edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>
    >> If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >> number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>

    > Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    > around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he needs
    > to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific MAC
    > addresses. I did both.
    >
    >
    >
    pcbutts1, Jul 3, 2005
    #15
  16. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    Or maybe disable DNS and route all his traffic to some awful porn site <g>

    "pcbutts1" <> wrote in message
    news:mYGxe.38430$...
    > Better yet have a little fun with him. Set up access time limits and watch
    > the look on his face when it turns off.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > The best live web video on the internet http://www.seedsv.com/webdemo.htm
    > NEW Embedded system W/Linux. We now sell DVR cards.
    > See it all at http://www.seedsv.com/products.htm
    > Sharpvision simply the best http://www.seedsv.com
    >
    >
    >
    > "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    > news:ZMCxe.22928$...
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> |>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my wireless
    >>> |>router.
    >>> |>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>> |>
    >>>
    >>> LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>
    >>> In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>> edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>
    >>> If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>> number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>

    >> Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >> around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >> needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to specific
    >> MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Toolman Tim, Jul 3, 2005
    #16
  17. Andy Mann

    FML Guest

    Toolman Tim wrote:
    > "FML" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >
    >>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>
    >>>"FML" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>"FML" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:eek:...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Toolman Tim wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>><> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>On "Andy Mann" <tom@tom_tom.com> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>|>I have found that my neighbour is getting free wi fi using my
    >>>>>>>>wireless
    >>>>>>>>|>router.
    >>>>>>>>|>How do I put a password on my system to stop it
    >>>>>>>>|>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>LOL, the jerk told you?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>In your browser type in 192.168.0.1
    >>>>>>>>edit your password, or just turn off your wifi from there
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>If 192.xxx doesn't work, in a dos window type in: netstat -r your
    >>>>>>>>number is the first one under Gateway.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Actually, that won't help...that would just keep neighbors from poking
    >>>>>>>around in the router settings. In addition to setting a password, he
    >>>>>>>needs to 1) set up encrytion keys and/or 2) restrict access to
    >>>>>>>specific MAC addresses. I did both.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>If all you are doing to secure your wifi connection is WEP encryption
    >>>>>>and MAC filtering, you are only keeping out the most casual of users.
    >>>>>>Anybody with a wireless card that knows how to read and has a little
    >>>>>>bit of time to learn a few tricks can break into your system in a
    >>>>>>matter of minutes.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>You may want to read "The Six Dumbest Ways to Secure a Wireless LAN"
    >>>>>>at:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>In my neighborhood, I'm not worried. My wireless signal doesn't even
    >>>>>make it to the fence posts, much less far enough out for someone to
    >>>>>steal Internet bandwidth. (I don't have WPA on my old-dog laptop.)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>But that doesn't seem to be the case for the OP. However, I seriously
    >>>>>doubt his neighbor is going to learn how to crack his WEP. If his has
    >>>>>WPA, that's even better.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Sounds like you're like me. I live out in the middle of no-where. The
    >>>>closest neighbor is 1/4 mile away. I don't even have WEP enabled on mine.
    >>>>If somebody wants to come all the way out here and try to get close
    >>>>enough to my house (after dealing with an electric gate and a pack of
    >>>>very rambunctious doggies), they can go ahead and piggy back onto my
    >>>>wifi.
    >>>>
    >>>>At the office, it is another story altogether. Full blown WPA2 there.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Yeah - we haven't done wireless at work for two reasons: our environment
    >>>is bad (significant electrical interference from milling equipment, and
    >>>metal siding on all the buildings - we'd have to go with antennae towers
    >>>and good line-of-sight) and cost vs. advantage. To get wi-fi to the outer
    >>>limits of our plant offices would cost significantly higher than normal
    >>>because of the environment, and wouldn't improve productivity enough to
    >>>justify it.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>I don'thave that problem. I own a small business and our "Global
    >>Headquarters" are in less than 2,500 sqft of office space, LOL.
    >>The only hardwire is to the servers, everything else is wifi. Works well
    >>for our little space.
    >>

    >
    > That is nice - and I would agree that office installations need the higher
    > security.
    >
    > When I started in the office at our plant, we were Arcnet (coax) and I think
    > it wasn't even star topology. I was always having to replace cards in the
    > 286/386 systems, and repair coax connections. It didn't take me long to get
    > them to switch to CAT3 10-baseT ethernet. And only two or three years after
    > that we went to CAT5. Now, our three primary servers have gigabit
    > capabilities, but my switches and fiberoptics between them would all have to
    > be replaced, and the wiring in one complex isn't up to spec for it either. I
    > bet in the next year or so the boss will let me contract someone to replace
    > the CAT5 infrastructure. Now that I'm a few years older, I don't want to do
    > the wiring again myself <g>
    >
    >
    >

    Yep. I'm definitely done crawling around laying cable. Been there...done
    that. I just found out last week that Verizon is about two blocks from
    my office with their "Fiber to the Premises" buildout here in the Dallas
    area. I am going to look into that. From what I've seen so far, looks
    like I'll be able to triple my speed for about half the price of my
    current pipe. May have to chuck the whole wifi thing and go with "Fiber
    to the Desktop". It has been a very good year (knock on wood) and I need
    to invest some profits back into the business or my taxes are going to
    eat me alive. I'd rather upgrade the office to full blown fiber than
    give it to Uncle Sam.
    FML, Jul 3, 2005
    #17
  18. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    <snip>

    >> When I started in the office at our plant, we were Arcnet (coax) and I
    >> think it wasn't even star topology. I was always having to replace cards
    >> in the 286/386 systems, and repair coax connections. It didn't take me
    >> long to get them to switch to CAT3 10-baseT ethernet. And only two or
    >> three years after that we went to CAT5. Now, our three primary servers
    >> have gigabit capabilities, but my switches and fiberoptics between them
    >> would all have to be replaced, and the wiring in one complex isn't up to
    >> spec for it either. I bet in the next year or so the boss will let me
    >> contract someone to replace the CAT5 infrastructure. Now that I'm a few
    >> years older, I don't want to do the wiring again myself <g>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Yep. I'm definitely done crawling around laying cable. Been there...done
    > that. I just found out last week that Verizon is about two blocks from my
    > office with their "Fiber to the Premises" buildout here in the Dallas
    > area. I am going to look into that. From what I've seen so far, looks like
    > I'll be able to triple my speed for about half the price of my current
    > pipe. May have to chuck the whole wifi thing and go with "Fiber to the
    > Desktop". It has been a very good year (knock on wood) and I need to
    > invest some profits back into the business or my taxes are going to eat me
    > alive. I'd rather upgrade the office to full blown fiber than give it to
    > Uncle Sam.
    >

    Way cool! We have fiber going down the highway about a mile from the office.
    The comm company putting it in has already contacted us, but we'd have to
    pay several grand to get that extra mile put in. So it's not in the works
    for us...at least not for now. Since our business uses the 'net rather
    lightly, (40 some email addresses, limited access to the web for most
    users), we can't justify the upgrade.
    Toolman Tim, Jul 3, 2005
    #18
  19. Andy Mann

    FML Guest

    Toolman Tim wrote:
    > <snip>
    >
    >>>When I started in the office at our plant, we were Arcnet (coax) and I
    >>>think it wasn't even star topology. I was always having to replace cards
    >>>in the 286/386 systems, and repair coax connections. It didn't take me
    >>>long to get them to switch to CAT3 10-baseT ethernet. And only two or
    >>>three years after that we went to CAT5. Now, our three primary servers
    >>>have gigabit capabilities, but my switches and fiberoptics between them
    >>>would all have to be replaced, and the wiring in one complex isn't up to
    >>>spec for it either. I bet in the next year or so the boss will let me
    >>>contract someone to replace the CAT5 infrastructure. Now that I'm a few
    >>>years older, I don't want to do the wiring again myself <g>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>Yep. I'm definitely done crawling around laying cable. Been there...done
    >>that. I just found out last week that Verizon is about two blocks from my
    >>office with their "Fiber to the Premises" buildout here in the Dallas
    >>area. I am going to look into that. From what I've seen so far, looks like
    >>I'll be able to triple my speed for about half the price of my current
    >>pipe. May have to chuck the whole wifi thing and go with "Fiber to the
    >>Desktop". It has been a very good year (knock on wood) and I need to
    >>invest some profits back into the business or my taxes are going to eat me
    >>alive. I'd rather upgrade the office to full blown fiber than give it to
    >>Uncle Sam.
    >>

    >
    > Way cool! We have fiber going down the highway about a mile from the office.
    > The comm company putting it in has already contacted us, but we'd have to
    > pay several grand to get that extra mile put in. So it's not in the works
    > for us...at least not for now. Since our business uses the 'net rather
    > lightly, (40 some email addresses, limited access to the web for most
    > users), we can't justify the upgrade.
    >
    >
    >

    That last mile has always been the killer. That's what's so cool about
    this Verizon thing. They bring the fiber to your premises for "free".
    I'd have to upgrade practically everything inside the office and buy
    their services (which is cheaper than the fractional T1 that I'm on
    now). We are smaller than you but we support a lot of our clients via
    VPN so we need a fat pipeline. Plus, since I'm the owner and I am a
    total geek our IT budget is very generous.
    FML, Jul 3, 2005
    #19
  20. Andy Mann

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "FML" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Toolman Tim wrote:
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>>>When I started in the office at our plant, we were Arcnet (coax) and I
    >>>>think it wasn't even star topology. I was always having to replace cards
    >>>>in the 286/386 systems, and repair coax connections. It didn't take me
    >>>>long to get them to switch to CAT3 10-baseT ethernet. And only two or
    >>>>three years after that we went to CAT5. Now, our three primary servers
    >>>>have gigabit capabilities, but my switches and fiberoptics between them
    >>>>would all have to be replaced, and the wiring in one complex isn't up to
    >>>>spec for it either. I bet in the next year or so the boss will let me
    >>>>contract someone to replace the CAT5 infrastructure. Now that I'm a few
    >>>>years older, I don't want to do the wiring again myself <g>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>Yep. I'm definitely done crawling around laying cable. Been there...done
    >>>that. I just found out last week that Verizon is about two blocks from my
    >>>office with their "Fiber to the Premises" buildout here in the Dallas
    >>>area. I am going to look into that. From what I've seen so far, looks
    >>>like I'll be able to triple my speed for about half the price of my
    >>>current pipe. May have to chuck the whole wifi thing and go with "Fiber
    >>>to the Desktop". It has been a very good year (knock on wood) and I need
    >>>to invest some profits back into the business or my taxes are going to
    >>>eat me alive. I'd rather upgrade the office to full blown fiber than give
    >>>it to Uncle Sam.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Way cool! We have fiber going down the highway about a mile from the
    >> office. The comm company putting it in has already contacted us, but we'd
    >> have to pay several grand to get that extra mile put in. So it's not in
    >> the works for us...at least not for now. Since our business uses the 'net
    >> rather lightly, (40 some email addresses, limited access to the web for
    >> most users), we can't justify the upgrade.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > That last mile has always been the killer. That's what's so cool about
    > this Verizon thing. They bring the fiber to your premises for "free". I'd
    > have to upgrade practically everything inside the office and buy their
    > services (which is cheaper than the fractional T1 that I'm on now). We are
    > smaller than you but we support a lot of our clients via VPN so we need a
    > fat pipeline. Plus, since I'm the owner and I am a total geek our IT
    > budget is very generous.
    >

    That helps a lot! We have Charter Pipeline cable - their fastest connection,
    I think 3gb or something. We looked a a fractional T1, but it's like
    everything else out here in the sticks - either not available or way too
    much $$. And while my bosses like their toys, they are not inclined to spend
    much cash on toys for the rest of us <g>
    Toolman Tim, Jul 3, 2005
    #20
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