Lighting, Background for Shooting Clothing Indoors

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Slonocode, Apr 1, 2004.

  1. Slonocode

    Slonocode Guest

    I'm looking for suggestions on how to setup lighting and background
    conditions for taking pics of clothing indoors.

    Problems I am currently having are:

    Blacks and very dark colors not able to get much detail.

    example
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=63863&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1


    I get white spots that sometimes appear in the photos. This example is not
    as severe as what sometimes happens.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=63871&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1


    Colors look totaly different in same item depending on closeup or full
    length.
    example
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=15769&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1

    You can also find a link to all my other items from the individual links
    above to see a more broad spectrum of the kind of photos I need to shoot.

    Also please don't take this as some kind of advertisement or spam. I'm just
    trying to show the kind of pics I need to take.

    I am currently using a 500watt halogen spotlight for my lightsource and a
    Kodak DC215 Zoom 1 megapixel camera.

    I realize that different colored items probably have different optimal
    lighting and background needs. But I'm looking for the happiest medium
    where I can use the same setup for all items and get "optimal" results.

    I'm looking for things like lighting source, lighting position, background
    colors, background materials. Or anything else that would help obtain more
    consitent photos.

    Also would a better camera ( ie more megapixels ) cure alot of these ills?


    Thanks for any help
    Sloncocode
    Slonocode, Apr 1, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Slonocode

    [BnH] Guest

    Digital has limitation.
    Esp consumer ones.

    There are a few technique you can try :

    - Try taking from an angle to show the contour of the material [beware of
    the moire fx :D]
    - Use center weighted metering to meter the object
    - Use some filter [ I don't know what they use, but a friend who is in the
    textile business asked me this question once and he said .. they use some
    filter infront of the cam ]

    Good luck

    =bob=

    "Slonocode" <> wrote in message
    news:c4gemm$2glsnf$-berlin.de...
    [BnH], Apr 1, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Slonocode

    Sorby Guest

    "Slonocode" <> wrote in message
    news:c4gemm$2glsnf$-berlin.de...
    > I'm looking for suggestions on how to setup lighting and background
    > conditions for taking pics of clothing indoors.
    >
    > Problems I am currently having are:
    >
    > Blacks and very dark colors not able to get much detail.


    <snip>

    > Colors look totaly different in same item depending on closeup or full
    > length.


    <snip>

    > I am currently using a 500watt halogen spotlight for my lightsource and a
    > Kodak DC215 Zoom 1 megapixel camera.
    >
    > I realize that different colored items probably have different optimal
    > lighting and background needs. But I'm looking for the happiest medium
    > where I can use the same setup for all items and get "optimal" results.
    >
    > I'm looking for things like lighting source, lighting position,

    background
    > colors, background materials. Or anything else that would help obtain

    more
    > consitent photos.
    >
    > Also would a better camera ( ie more megapixels ) cure alot of these ills?


    Hi...

    I have just found a review of your camera and see that it has an 'exposure
    lock' option.

    If you can find out how to set the exposure lock (might just mean
    half-pressing the button whilst pointing at a mid-grey sheet of card/paper,
    then reframing the shot before shooting) then use this to ensure that, at
    the very least, all the photos of the same garment, whether close-up or
    full-length, will look the same (or a similar) colour. If the exposure lock
    is set by half-pressing the button then you'll need to do this for each
    shot - but make sure you lock the exposure on the same mid-grey scene - or
    wherever - each time)

    You can also increase or decrease the exposure half-stop
    increments/decrements so use this & your LCD display to get an exposure
    you're happy with - then lock that exposure for all the remaining shots.

    I also notice that some of your eBay shots are out of focus - be sure to use
    a tripod - your camera ISO140 rating is very low for hand-holding in
    relatively dark conditions.

    Have you considered using the camera's inbuilt flash?

    I don't think you need a better camera for this purpose - you just need to
    learn to control the variables better. :eek:)

    Hope this is of some help.

    --
    Sorby
    Sorby, Apr 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Slonocode

    Ken Burns Guest

    Don't use the on-camera flash as someone else suggested, that's not a good
    way to do product photography. To work successfully with products, you need
    to use a camera that gives you the capability to manually control exposure
    settings and white balance. The camera needs to give a histogram readout so
    you can insure proper exposure. Then you will need to edit in a program
    like Photoshop where you can adjust the white point, black point and gamma
    in the levels adjustment. More than likely your camera uses an auto white
    balance which will not work with shots like this. You need the ability to
    manually select a white balance setting that matches your light source, or
    better yet, manually set the white balance using a neutral gray reference
    like the Kodak 18% gray card.

    A spot light alone is not a very good light source to use. I really can't
    discuss all the aspects of product lighting here, there have been entire
    books written on the subject of lighting and controlling its character. You
    will find that using more than one light source and controlling the degree
    of diffusion and the directionality of the light is what gives product shots
    (fashion or otherwise) their character. If there is a class offered in a
    local school or college, take it. If not, check the local library or book
    store and see if there are any good books on lighting techniques. There is
    a whole lot more to it than just pointing a light at the product.




    "Slonocode" <> wrote in message
    news:c4gemm$2glsnf$-berlin.de...
    > I'm looking for suggestions on how to setup lighting and background
    > conditions for taking pics of clothing indoors.
    >
    > Problems I am currently having are:
    >
    > Blacks and very dark colors not able to get much detail.
    >
    > example
    >

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=63863&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1
    >
    >
    > I get white spots that sometimes appear in the photos. This example is

    not
    > as severe as what sometimes happens.
    >

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=63871&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1
    >
    >
    > Colors look totaly different in same item depending on closeup or full
    > length.
    > example
    >

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=15769&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1
    >
    > You can also find a link to all my other items from the individual links
    > above to see a more broad spectrum of the kind of photos I need to shoot.
    >
    > Also please don't take this as some kind of advertisement or spam. I'm

    just
    > trying to show the kind of pics I need to take.
    >
    > I am currently using a 500watt halogen spotlight for my lightsource and a
    > Kodak DC215 Zoom 1 megapixel camera.
    >
    > I realize that different colored items probably have different optimal
    > lighting and background needs. But I'm looking for the happiest medium
    > where I can use the same setup for all items and get "optimal" results.
    >
    > I'm looking for things like lighting source, lighting position,

    background
    > colors, background materials. Or anything else that would help obtain

    more
    > consitent photos.
    >
    > Also would a better camera ( ie more megapixels ) cure alot of these ills?
    >
    >
    > Thanks for any help
    > Sloncocode
    >
    >
    >
    Ken Burns, Apr 1, 2004
    #4
  5. Slonocode

    Sorby Guest

    "Ken Burns" <> wrote in message
    news:Z0Xac.6593$...
    > Don't use the on-camera flash as someone else suggested, that's not a good
    > way to do product photography.


    Ken - I suggested using the on-camera flash because at the very least the
    product colours might be rendered more accurately than with a light source
    the camera knows nothing about.

    I appreciate it's not the most flattering source of light to present
    products in but, given the original poster's rather humble equipment and
    aspirations, I don't think my advice was off beam.

    Given that the poster's equipment doesn't offer ability to manually control
    the exposures or white balance or display a histogram I would urge him/her
    to at least try using the on-camera flash until such time as they have a
    camera which affords them the control they need. This will at least give
    them a fighting chance of getting the consistency he/she specifically
    requires without having to become experts in the field of product
    photography and without having to buy more expensive equipment.

    --
    Sorby
    Sorby, Apr 1, 2004
    #5
  6. Slonocode

    Slonocode Guest

    Thanks for the responses!

    Actually the on camera flash is always set to auto and I always have to
    retake the photo if the flash doesn't fire. If the flash doesn't fire the
    photos are much too dark to use.

    As per suggested I looked at the exposure settings available in the camera.
    It appears that I can adjust the exposure amount from -2.0 to +2.0 in 0.5
    increments. Where a 1.0 increase doubles amount of light or 1.0 decrease
    cuts amount of light in half. The exposure amount can be locked to an
    amount as well. I have never really played with this so that is definately
    something to try.

    I realize that a spotlight is not the best light source for this but I often
    have to take pictures in the evenings where I have no access to natural
    sunlight. For my needs the spotlight is pretty adequate for most of my
    photos.

    I guess where I'm coming from is:
    What specifically might I change while photographing very dark or black
    colored garments to get better results?

    Same for really light or khaki colored garments?

    What causes white spots to appear in some photos and what can I do to change
    that?


    While I would love to have the space, time and money to setup a studio like
    environment it's just not feasible for what I need these pictures for.
    Most of the photos are adequate and some are actually quite good for my
    needs. I'm just looking for how I might improve some of the really horrid
    ones.

    Thanks Again
    Slonocode
    Slonocode, Apr 1, 2004
    #6
  7. Slonocode

    zeitgeist Guest

    mixing flash (daylight or cool tone) with a halogen lamp (incandescent or
    warm tone) is asking for trouble. It will throw off any software routines
    to correct.

    get a second flash that you can slave to your camera flash,

    does our camera have a hot shoe to attach a flash? if not you might want to
    consider a better camera that will allow a better flash, get one that you
    can tilt to bounce and then bounce off a side wall or ceiling, use a second
    slave flash to give you directional lighting like you get from that halogen
    lamp, you can still use it as a modeling light to see what you might get
    from the slave flash.

    auto exposure on your camera is seeing a lot of a color and adjusting which
    can also throw off the color balance. so you have a 'cold' light from the
    flash, a warm light from the side and the camera sensor is seeing a field
    view of a yellow fabric, that view varies as you do a close up so the image
    color alters.

    black on black is hard to do, a light much further on the side will skim
    light across the item raising highlights and reveling texture and detail.


    >
    > Actually the on camera flash is always set to auto and I always have to
    > retake the photo if the flash doesn't fire. If the flash doesn't fire the
    > photos are much too dark to use.
    >
    > As per suggested I looked at the exposure settings available in the

    camera.
    > It appears that I can adjust the exposure amount from -2.0 to +2.0 in 0.5
    > increments. Where a 1.0 increase doubles amount of light or 1.0 decrease
    > cuts amount of light in half. The exposure amount can be locked to an
    > amount as well. I have never really played with this so that is

    definately
    > something to try.
    >
    > I realize that a spotlight is not the best light source for this but I

    often
    > have to take pictures in the evenings where I have no access to natural
    > sunlight. For my needs the spotlight is pretty adequate for most of my
    > photos.
    >
    > I guess where I'm coming from is:
    > What specifically might I change while photographing very dark or black
    > colored garments to get better results?
    >
    > Same for really light or khaki colored garments?
    >
    > What causes white spots to appear in some photos and what can I do to

    change
    > that?
    >
    >
    > While I would love to have the space, time and money to setup a studio

    like
    > environment it's just not feasible for what I need these pictures for.
    > Most of the photos are adequate and some are actually quite good for my
    > needs. I'm just looking for how I might improve some of the really horrid
    > ones.
    >
    > Thanks Again
    > Slonocode
    >
    >
    >
    zeitgeist, Apr 2, 2004
    #7
  8. [On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 04:24:21 GMT, "zeitgeist"
    <> wrote:]

    > get a second flash that you can slave to your camera flash


    <snip>

    This is what I used to do during my convential 35mm studio
    days. It's very easy.

    You need to know a little bit about lighting, but the concepts
    aren't all that complicated. A 1 to 2 ratio, etc. Keep the
    lights off the front and out of the eyes. Most people can
    work it out. Add a hair light and you're all set.
    The Other Harry, Apr 2, 2004
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Remove filter when shooting flash indoors?

    , Jul 17, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    826
    Mxsmanic
    Jul 18, 2003
  2. Bob McLain

    Need Help with Basic Lighting, Shooting Problems

    Bob McLain, Nov 24, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    536
    Don Coon
    Nov 25, 2003
  3. john

    Shooting sports at night/indoors

    john, Jul 11, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    2,962
    Roe Thomas
    Jul 13, 2004
  4. John Edwards

    Question on Photo Lighting in indoors.

    John Edwards, Dec 13, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    325
    Paul H.
    Dec 14, 2004
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    756
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page