Life After MCSE

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. Hello all

    I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started, no
    experience was required... We all know that that was a whole load of bull...
    I have seen soo many people come on the course and drop out because the
    volume of information they have to read let alone remember is far too much
    than a normal human being should be asked to handle... Unfortunatly none of
    the girls could keep up on the course... I am not saying anything bad apart
    from I wish they did...

    Well my question is this... What is it like straight out of MCSE...???

    Looking back on my 1.5 years of MCSA/MCSE.. There is a lot I could be
    doing... I was wondering what is a MCSE grad expected to do in the
    industry..?? Will I be expected to know how to set up a network spanning
    multiple buildings like at a university campus that is hacker proof... OK I
    know nothing is really hacker proof unless u lock it away.. But I haven't
    been taught much about setting up network connections like configuring
    routers, setting up backbones or whats the best way to link multiple
    buildings together... Would I need the help of Cisco professionals.. And if I
    was asked how much would it cost to set up a network of 100 computers, where
    would I go to purchase such an amount..?? Does it matter where..??

    I have basically gone over a scenario of my own that runs along the lines of
    "Can you please make a network for 100 computers that is in 3 different
    sites"... Although I can probably get down to it and do most of it.. the more
    I think of the implications the more I feel like crying...


    I bet it's not going to be that bad but can you guyz please give me some
    examples of your first jobs after MCSE qualifcations..?? No names of
    companies needed... I am just interested in the responsibilities you were
    given, what kind of day-to-day tasks did you do and what was the most
    difficult challenge you faced within the first 6 months of the job...

    Thanks to everyone or anyone who replies to this message in advance...
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=, Jan 3, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    kpg Guest

    Yes.

    (Fris should like this one)
    kpg, Jan 3, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    JaR Guest

    In microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?= climbed on a
    soapbox & opined:

    > Hello all
    >
    > I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    > straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started,
    > no experience<<<Major Snippage>>>>the most difficult challenge you

    faced within the first 6 months of
    > the job...
    >


    And here, mes enfants, we have the heart of the problem. MCSE is *not*
    designed to be a training program. It is intended to be a means of
    certifying that an individual has worked with, and understands Microsoft
    systems. If we read the FAQ at:
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/faq.asp
    we see that:
    "The MCSE on Microsoft Windows 2000 credential is appropriate for IT
    professionals working in the typically complex computing environment of
    medium-to-large organizations. We recommend that an MCSE on Windows 2000
    have at least one year of experience implementing and administering a
    network operating system."

    However, during the dot-com explosion of the '90s, there was so much
    demand for techies, that any monkey with an MCSE could find a job.
    Keeping it was another matter entirely. The world has changed, and loads
    of techs are looking for work or have gotten out of the biz entirely. But
    training companies are still selling poor saps these certs as a way to
    get into the field. The net result is they are pretty much meaningless
    except to get past a resume filter and at least be read by a human. If
    you want to break into the business, try some of the big box retailers
    like CompUSA or whatever is in your area. They'll likely start you at
    close to minimum wage, but hey! you are working around computers.

    I personally went to work for the service department of a large auto
    dealer, and have gradually worked my way into an in-house IT tech
    position. But it's been a long haul,and about all the certification
    process did for me was introduce me to this newsgroup.<BFG>

    Good luck.

    There, that's my first semi-rant of the new year. I feel better now.

    --
    JaR
    Thug 10110
    Click on MCNGP.com and win nerd32768 a career in health care!
    JaR, Jan 3, 2005
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?Q?Frisbee=C2=AE?=, Jan 3, 2005
    #4
  5. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Doom Guest

    "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello all
    >

    <self-doubting snipped>

    So you finally got your MCSE and now you're scared to get a job. Don't you
    think it would have been good idea to find some of this stuff out BEFORE
    investing your time and money. I'll tell you what it's like where I work.
    I'm expected to know everything about pretty much everything. Why just last
    week I had to trouble shoot a scale because and I quote the luser "it's
    plugged into the computer, you HAVE TO KNOW HOW TO FIX IT." If you're
    nervous about entering the "real world" you should be. There are alot of
    stupid lusers who need to be saved from themselves. I predict if you last a
    full year at your first job you'll either find a better job or you'll quit
    IT altogether. Good luck and please don't apply to my company.
    Doom, Jan 3, 2005
    #5
  6. >I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    >straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started, no
    >experience was required...


    HAHAHAHA!!!!

    >We all know that that was a whole load of bull...


    Rubbish! Now would you like to buy some V*I*A^GR_A?

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Jan 3, 2005
    #6
  7. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Consultant Guest

    heh heh

    "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello all
    >
    > I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    > straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started, no
    > experience was required... We all know that that was a whole load of
    > bull...
    > I have seen soo many people come on the course and drop out because the
    > volume of information they have to read let alone remember is far too much
    > than a normal human being should be asked to handle... Unfortunatly none
    > of
    > the girls could keep up on the course... I am not saying anything bad
    > apart
    > from I wish they did...
    >
    > Well my question is this... What is it like straight out of MCSE...???
    >
    > Looking back on my 1.5 years of MCSA/MCSE.. There is a lot I could be
    > doing... I was wondering what is a MCSE grad expected to do in the
    > industry..?? Will I be expected to know how to set up a network spanning
    > multiple buildings like at a university campus that is hacker proof... OK
    > I
    > know nothing is really hacker proof unless u lock it away.. But I haven't
    > been taught much about setting up network connections like configuring
    > routers, setting up backbones or whats the best way to link multiple
    > buildings together... Would I need the help of Cisco professionals.. And
    > if I
    > was asked how much would it cost to set up a network of 100 computers,
    > where
    > would I go to purchase such an amount..?? Does it matter where..??
    >
    > I have basically gone over a scenario of my own that runs along the lines
    > of
    > "Can you please make a network for 100 computers that is in 3 different
    > sites"... Although I can probably get down to it and do most of it.. the
    > more
    > I think of the implications the more I feel like crying...
    >
    >
    > I bet it's not going to be that bad but can you guyz please give me some
    > examples of your first jobs after MCSE qualifcations..?? No names of
    > companies needed... I am just interested in the responsibilities you were
    > given, what kind of day-to-day tasks did you do and what was the most
    > difficult challenge you faced within the first 6 months of the job...
    >
    > Thanks to everyone or anyone who replies to this message in advance...
    Consultant, Jan 3, 2005
    #7
  8. Hey... It's not like I am a complete moron.... I have had 2 years A Level
    computing and 3 years Computer Sciecne at Sussex Uni... A couple of years
    working as head of IT/Administraion for a very small cleaning company (No
    network or web pressence unfortuantely, just a bunch of staff who don't know
    much about turning on a computer) and now I am finishing MCSA/MCSE....

    What I was trying to say is that basically as someone has mentioned... MCSE
    seems to imply that you should know everything there is to know about
    absolutely everything regarding computers... But MCSE doesn't cover
    everything... It seems to be more of a tutorial of how to use some Microsoft
    products... Nothing more... Just like a Video manual which we all know can be
    a bit difficult... But there are tons of things that MCSE doesn't cover
    including where is the best place to go for purchasing mass quantities of
    computing equipment and how to setup advanced physical network structures...
    Hel... I haven't even seen a server blade throughout the entire course... I
    am very disappointed... And now I am sure every employer is going to expect
    me to be a IT guru for their firm on just about every little thing they can
    think of... I haven't seen any server rooms or been given any information
    about how much resources a computer/network needs to support 10 PCs... 100
    PCs.... 1000 PCs... or 1 million... It seems like we just have to do things
    by trail and error... O and to ask you guyz for help which I have found very
    entertaining but not the most helpful advice I have seen...

    Happy New Year All and Keep Up The Fun.....
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=, Jan 4, 2005
    #8
  9. Hi Cliff.

    A MCSE is a certification that an employer would expect the holder to have a
    "basic" knowledge of the Microsoft operating system such as installing
    operating system, promoting domain controller, configuring dns/wins/dhcp,
    joining clients to the domain, configuring users and groups, troubleshooting
    connectivity/domain problems, configuring Group and security policy,
    installing updates, and the basics on Remote Access, VPN, ipsec, Certificate
    Services, IIS, etc.

    The scenario you describe is not something that would be expected by being
    an MCSE alone. That would require additional experience and be a plus
    towards employment. When you go for a job or fill out a resume, be explicit
    in what you know.

    You can teach yourself a lot of what you mention. Routers are not that hard
    to do the basics and the same for firewalls. I suggest you buy an old Cisco
    router such as a 2514 - try to get one with all cables, cdroms,
    transceivers and a late IOS. Do the same for a firewall such as the
    Netscreen 5XP [at least version 4 OS] which has the same operating system as
    their high end models. You should be able to get both for under $200 each on
    Ebay. Also consider getting a switch such as the HP Procurve 2512 that is
    managed and has advanced security features - usually on Ebay for around
    $150. There is documentation available for those devices from the
    manufactures websites if you need it. I have all these devices on my home
    network lab.

    Than read and train yourself a lot. There is a ton of good info for free on
    the internet and I buy a lot of books on Amazon "used" for less than half of
    regular price. Post questions is appropriate newsgroups when you have
    further questions. MS has tons of newsgroups. The links below are a start
    for more reading and an example of what is available.

    http://labmice.techtarget.com/
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/default.mspx
    http://www.bookpool.com/.x/m5yz2j6zkr/sm/0735618682
    http://www.bookpool.com/.x/m5yz2jpm8n/sm/0735712328
    http://www.bookpool.com/.x/m5yz2jsg1m/ss?qs=0735620334&x=33&y=11
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/Security/topics/network/firewall.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/guidance/avdind_0.mspx

    As far as buying lots of hardware. I have not done that myself but Dell
    would be a good place to start and then a place like CDW for other needs. Be
    sure to have an idea what you need before purchasing and use the internet to
    research ahead of time. Don't be intimidated by 100 computers in three
    different sites. You might want to study for the basic Cisco certification
    for CCNA to learn more about routing even if you don't plan to take the
    exam. Good luck. --- Steve



    "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello all
    >
    > I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    > straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started, no
    > experience was required... We all know that that was a whole load of
    > bull...
    > I have seen soo many people come on the course and drop out because the
    > volume of information they have to read let alone remember is far too much
    > than a normal human being should be asked to handle... Unfortunatly none
    > of
    > the girls could keep up on the course... I am not saying anything bad
    > apart
    > from I wish they did...
    >
    > Well my question is this... What is it like straight out of MCSE...???
    >
    > Looking back on my 1.5 years of MCSA/MCSE.. There is a lot I could be
    > doing... I was wondering what is a MCSE grad expected to do in the
    > industry..?? Will I be expected to know how to set up a network spanning
    > multiple buildings like at a university campus that is hacker proof... OK
    > I
    > know nothing is really hacker proof unless u lock it away.. But I haven't
    > been taught much about setting up network connections like configuring
    > routers, setting up backbones or whats the best way to link multiple
    > buildings together... Would I need the help of Cisco professionals.. And
    > if I
    > was asked how much would it cost to set up a network of 100 computers,
    > where
    > would I go to purchase such an amount..?? Does it matter where..??
    >
    > I have basically gone over a scenario of my own that runs along the lines
    > of
    > "Can you please make a network for 100 computers that is in 3 different
    > sites"... Although I can probably get down to it and do most of it.. the
    > more
    > I think of the implications the more I feel like crying...
    >
    >
    > I bet it's not going to be that bad but can you guyz please give me some
    > examples of your first jobs after MCSE qualifcations..?? No names of
    > companies needed... I am just interested in the responsibilities you were
    > given, what kind of day-to-day tasks did you do and what was the most
    > difficult challenge you faced within the first 6 months of the job...
    >
    > Thanks to everyone or anyone who replies to this message in advance...
    Steven L Umbach, Jan 4, 2005
    #9
  10. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Nerd32768 Guest

    "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey... It's not like I am a complete moron.... I have had 2 years A Level
    > computing and 3 years Computer Sciecne at Sussex Uni... A couple of years
    > working as head of IT/Administraion for a very small cleaning company (No
    > network or web pressence unfortuantely, just a bunch of staff who don't

    know
    > much about turning on a computer) and now I am finishing MCSA/MCSE....


    you'll need at least 10 years of enterprise experience-the market is dry

    > What I was trying to say is that basically as someone has mentioned...

    MCSE
    > seems to imply that you should know everything there is to know about
    > absolutely everything regarding computers...


    Not for the last 5 years

    > But MCSE doesn't cover
    > everything... It seems to be more of a tutorial of how to use some

    Microsoft
    > products... Nothing more...
    > Just like a Video manual which we all know can be
    > a bit difficult...

    That is exactly the point. it is a MICROSOFT certification, so it is based
    on microsoft products, mainly microsoft servers and active directory.

    > But there are tons of things that MCSE doesn't cover
    > including where is the best place to go for purchasing mass quantities of
    > computing equipment


    you go to a computer company, aand you buy mass quantities of computers.
    Some of the most common are: Dell, HP/Compaq, IBM(lenovo), Gateway, and good
    homemade equipment

    > and how to setup advanced physical network structures...


    again, this is a MICROSOFT certification. Microsoft is a SOFTWARE company.
    If you want t know about advanced physical stuff, get your CCNA, and learn
    everything about CISCO products, or get a vendor-neutral certification from
    CompTIA(Network+)

    > Hel... I haven't even seen a server blade throughout the entire course...

    I
    > am very disappointed...


    when was the last time that microsoft sold blades??? Again: THIS IS A
    MICROSOFT SOFTWARE CERTIFICATION

    > And now I am sure every employer is going to expect
    > me to be a IT guru for their firm on just about every little thing they

    can
    > think of...


    If thats how it is, then i wouldn't want to be you

    > I haven't seen any server rooms


    server rooms...SERVER+

    > or been given any information
    > about how much resources a computer/network needs to support 10 PCs... 100
    > PCs.... 1000 PCs... or 1 million...


    That's because that is entry level computing, and can be figured out with
    6th grade math, and algebra(as needed). If they put that on the test, then
    they will have to change it every f*n day, which would be good for most of
    us, but the exam price would go up, and you would be more upset about
    microsoft certification

    > It seems like we just have to do things
    > by trail and error...


    That's how you lose your job: Google is your best friend, always

    > O and to ask you guyz for help which I have found very
    > entertaining but not the most helpful advice I have seen...


    That's why we became MCNGP certified(for more information, please see
    www.MCNGP.com, the best IT resource in the world)

    > Happy New Year All and Keep Up The Fun.....


    We don't need a new year for all of the fun. things get really interesting
    during the summer.


    Nerd32768
    MCSA , MCNGP, Network+, A+, waiting for Server+ results(all done during 2
    summer breaks)
    Nerd32768, Jan 4, 2005
    #10
  11. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    JaR Guest

    In microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?= climbed on a
    soapbox & opined:

    > And now I am sure every employer is going to expect
    > me to be a IT guru for their firm on just about every little thing
    > they can think of...


    Please do not give that another thought. They will expect you to do not
    much more than walk and chew gum simultaniously.

    Trust me.

    --
    JaR
    Thug 10110
    Click on MCNGP.com and win nerd32768 healthy cynicism!
    JaR, Jan 4, 2005
    #11
  12. I am the IT manager for 2 computer career institutes. In addition to
    graphics and med billing/coding, we teach MOC courses in W2K, W2K3, and
    security. I am a graduate of the W2K program, started as an intern and
    worked my way up.
    Heres how it works:
    No class will prepare you for the real world. Period. Anyone who tells you
    different is an idiot. No college degrees will do so either. It doesn't
    matter what you want to be when you grow up, you have to start small and work
    your way up. Gain the knowledge as you go. An MCSE on your resume looks
    good, but most interviews I have gone to (by the way, I haven't finished
    gaining my MCSE yet, just for the record) they test your knowledge and your
    ability to figure out problems, not how well read you are. I've had
    potential clients put me in front of a broken network, computer, etc, and say
    "fix it!". Gaining the MCSE, or the knowledge from MOC courses, is only a
    launching point. If you look at the test information, they recommend you
    have a minimum of a year real world experience before you start taking the
    exams. That is what I have been doing, and it is paying dividends. In the
    last year I have gone from no job offers to internship offers to minimum wage
    help desk offers to now working as an IT administrator and manager, as well
    as doing consultant work for Merrill Lynch, Target, and numerous other
    companies. It's the experience you gain as you work your way up that makes
    you valuable, and makes the time and sacrifices you put into this career path
    worth it.
    Gather equiptment to practice with. I have a motley collection of old PII's
    (10 or so)that I use at home to test different network setups. Total
    investment in equipment: $600. Microsoft makes evals of all their software
    available, use it to build your skills. It'll pay off in the end.
    =?Utf-8?B?UGFyYW11c0FkbWlu?=, Jan 4, 2005
    #12
  13. Don't worry. You probably won't be expected to learn more than you already
    did in the last 1.5 years.

    My advice is: don't panic, do some research (STFW is a good start) and do
    not leave anyone without the answer they expect.

    Recognizing you don't know something is the first step to learn it.

    Welcome and Good luck.

    []s Christian Becker

    MCSE, MCDBA, HP MASE
    MSc Digital Systems Reliability and Safety
    São Paulo, Brazil
    Christian Becker, Jan 5, 2005
    #13
  14. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    JaR <> wrote in
    news:Xns95D35E6FB8836plentespamsuxsofthom@207.46.248.16:

    > In microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?= climbed on a
    > soapbox & opined:
    >
    >> Hello all
    >>
    >> I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    >> straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started,
    >> no experience<<<Major Snippage>>>>the most difficult challenge you

    > faced within the first 6 months of
    >> the job...
    >>

    >
    > And here, mes enfants, we have the heart of the problem. MCSE is *not*
    > designed to be a training program. It is intended to be a means of
    > certifying that an individual has worked with, and understands
    > Microsoft systems. If we read the FAQ at:
    > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/faq.asp
    > we see that:
    > "The MCSE on Microsoft Windows 2000 credential is appropriate for IT
    > professionals working in the typically complex computing environment
    > of medium-to-large organizations. We recommend that an MCSE on Windows
    > 2000 have at least one year of experience implementing and
    > administering a network operating system."
    >
    > However, during the dot-com explosion of the '90s, there was so much
    > demand for techies, that any monkey with an MCSE could find a job.
    > Keeping it was another matter entirely. The world has changed, and
    > loads of techs are looking for work or have gotten out of the biz
    > entirely. But training companies are still selling poor saps these
    > certs as a way to get into the field. The net result is they are
    > pretty much meaningless except to get past a resume filter and at
    > least be read by a human. If you want to break into the business, try
    > some of the big box retailers like CompUSA or whatever is in your
    > area. They'll likely start you at close to minimum wage, but hey! you
    > are working around computers.
    >
    > I personally went to work for the service department of a large auto
    > dealer, and have gradually worked my way into an in-house IT tech
    > position. But it's been a long haul,and about all the certification
    > process did for me was introduce me to this newsgroup.<BFG>
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > There, that's my first semi-rant of the new year. I feel better now.
    >


    *clap clap clap clap*

    my first clap of the new year....



    --
    Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39
    http://www.mcngp.com/
    "Shhhh... Do you smell that? I think is't Albanian Goat Smegma!"
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/google.gif
    Rowdy Yates, Jan 5, 2005
    #14
  15. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere <.> wrote in
    news::

    >>I have spent the last year and a half on my MCSA/MCSE qualifications
    >>straight out of Uni (Computer Science)... Apparently when I started, no
    >>experience was required...

    >
    > HAHAHAHA!!!!
    >
    >>We all know that that was a whole load of bull...

    >
    > Rubbish! Now would you like to buy some V*I*A^GR_A?
    >
    > Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    >


    how about beach front property in Utah? i can give you a great deal!!
    chicks in bikinis all over the beach just sweating in the sun!!

    --
    Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39
    http://www.mcngp.com/
    "Shhhh... Do you smell that? I think is't Albanian Goat Smegma!"
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/google.gif
    Rowdy Yates, Jan 5, 2005
    #15
  16. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    "=?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=" <> wrote in
    news::

    > Hey... It's not like I am a complete moron.... I have had 2 years A


    <longs pointless post snipped>

    if you get an MCSE 2000 - you are expected to know how to work with
    Windows 2000 Server. if you get an MCSE 2003 you are expected to know how
    to work with Windows 2003 server. what part of that do you not
    understand?

    don't worry - no one is going to ask you to redesign SprintUSA's network.
    just try not to use a wheel mouse and drag & drop as if you are playing
    Age of Empires in Hard level while you are working on AD OU's. ;-)


    --
    Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39
    http://www.mcngp.com/
    "Shhhh... Do you smell that? I think is't Albanian Goat Smegma!"
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/google.gif
    Rowdy Yates, Jan 5, 2005
    #16
  17. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Andy Guest

    Hi Cliff

    Back in 1999 I finished my certifications. About the same time I got by
    first job as a system administrator. Sure, I knew a lot about NT4, Microsoft
    technologies and such. Or so i thought. What a shock, 3 days into the job, I
    quickly understood one thing. I still had a lot to learn. What do you do in
    such a situation? Well, you begin to read, and learn even more. The first 6
    months on the job, I learnt as much I did prepering for the certifications.
    But this was the real deal.
    Was the certifications a waste of time? No, it gave me some valuable basics
    for doing my job. Sure, I had to learn everyhing about hardware the hard
    way. But, one thing you'll quick learn is that when you work with IT the
    technology is quickly changing. If you took the MCSE track to quickly get a
    high paid system Manageer job, and though "thats it", your wrong. But, if
    you'e the real deal. A person who really has a interest in computers and
    software, you'll rather quickly learn what you need. And you will continue
    to learn every single day.
    So what is my present situation?
    Well, now I'm 28 years old. I've begun the process of upgraring my
    certifications from NT4 to W2k3. I've been working for the same company for
    over 5 years. I've gone the ranks from IT worker, to systems integrator and
    now I'm the IT manager. I've done hand's on work with integrating A.D in a
    network with over 300 servers, several sites, IP subnets etc. I've done 2
    relocations of the computers halls. This is things I never learnt doing my
    first certifications. You learn by doing. You'll meet a lot of challenges,
    all the time. But I would never change my chosen profession.
    So is the MCSE woth it? I think there are pros and cons. If you have a job,
    it is not so important. But, they are a great way of documenting you level
    of competance. Or so it seems:)

    "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey... It's not like I am a complete moron.... I have had 2 years A Level
    > computing and 3 years Computer Sciecne at Sussex Uni... A couple of years
    > working as head of IT/Administraion for a very small cleaning company (No
    > network or web pressence unfortuantely, just a bunch of staff who don't
    > know
    > much about turning on a computer) and now I am finishing MCSA/MCSE....
    >
    > What I was trying to say is that basically as someone has mentioned...
    > MCSE
    > seems to imply that you should know everything there is to know about
    > absolutely everything regarding computers... But MCSE doesn't cover
    > everything... It seems to be more of a tutorial of how to use some
    > Microsoft
    > products... Nothing more... Just like a Video manual which we all know can
    > be
    > a bit difficult... But there are tons of things that MCSE doesn't cover
    > including where is the best place to go for purchasing mass quantities of
    > computing equipment and how to setup advanced physical network
    > structures...
    > Hel... I haven't even seen a server blade throughout the entire course...
    > I
    > am very disappointed... And now I am sure every employer is going to
    > expect
    > me to be a IT guru for their firm on just about every little thing they
    > can
    > think of... I haven't seen any server rooms or been given any information
    > about how much resources a computer/network needs to support 10 PCs... 100
    > PCs.... 1000 PCs... or 1 million... It seems like we just have to do
    > things
    > by trail and error... O and to ask you guyz for help which I have found
    > very
    > entertaining but not the most helpful advice I have seen...
    >
    > Happy New Year All and Keep Up The Fun.....
    >
    >
    Andy, Jan 5, 2005
    #17
  18. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    Back in 1989 I got real drunk one night, and I was at this Todd Rundgren
    concert, you know the one where he was touring the "Nearly Human" album,
    pretty good album, so anyway, I saw this girl, and she was like real hot.
    So my buddy who was with me said I should go up to her and pick her up.
    So I said what the hell. I walked up to her and said she was real hot and
    if she wanted to go have a beer. Then next thing, someone grabbed me by
    the collar from behind and threw me accross the floor. Then this guy
    started kicking me. Turned out to be her boyfriend.. Next thing, the
    girl, who was real hot! - she started kicking me. and my buddy came in to
    save me, but they threw him on the floor as well and they started kicking
    both of us. and...

    oh, what where we talking about again? certifications... right..the MCSE.

    :)

    "Andy" <> wrote in
    news:#mW#:

    > Hi Cliff
    >
    > Back in 1999 I finished my certifications. About the same time I got
    > by first job as a system administrator. Sure, I knew a lot about NT4,
    > Microsoft technologies and such. Or so i thought. What a shock, 3 days
    > into the job, I quickly understood one thing. I still had a lot to
    > learn. What do you do in such a situation? Well, you begin to read,
    > and learn even more. The first 6 months on the job, I learnt as much I
    > did prepering for the certifications. But this was the real deal.
    > Was the certifications a waste of time? No, it gave me some valuable
    > basics for doing my job. Sure, I had to learn everyhing about hardware
    > the hard way. But, one thing you'll quick learn is that when you work
    > with IT the technology is quickly changing. If you took the MCSE track
    > to quickly get a high paid system Manageer job, and though "thats it",
    > your wrong. But, if you'e the real deal. A person who really has a
    > interest in computers and software, you'll rather quickly learn what
    > you need. And you will continue to learn every single day.
    > So what is my present situation?
    > Well, now I'm 28 years old. I've begun the process of upgraring my
    > certifications from NT4 to W2k3. I've been working for the same
    > company for over 5 years. I've gone the ranks from IT worker, to
    > systems integrator and now I'm the IT manager. I've done hand's on
    > work with integrating A.D in a network with over 300 servers, several
    > sites, IP subnets etc. I've done 2 relocations of the computers halls.
    > This is things I never learnt doing my first certifications. You learn
    > by doing. You'll meet a lot of challenges, all the time. But I would
    > never change my chosen profession. So is the MCSE woth it? I think
    > there are pros and cons. If you have a job, it is not so important.
    > But, they are a great way of documenting you level of competance. Or
    > so it seems:)
    >
    > "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hey... It's not like I am a complete moron.... I have had 2 years A
    >> Level computing and 3 years Computer Sciecne at Sussex Uni... A
    >> couple of years working as head of IT/Administraion for a very small
    >> cleaning company (No network or web pressence unfortuantely, just a
    >> bunch of staff who don't know
    >> much about turning on a computer) and now I am finishing
    >> MCSA/MCSE....
    >>
    >> What I was trying to say is that basically as someone has
    >> mentioned... MCSE
    >> seems to imply that you should know everything there is to know about
    >> absolutely everything regarding computers... But MCSE doesn't cover
    >> everything... It seems to be more of a tutorial of how to use some
    >> Microsoft
    >> products... Nothing more... Just like a Video manual which we all
    >> know can be
    >> a bit difficult... But there are tons of things that MCSE doesn't
    >> cover including where is the best place to go for purchasing mass
    >> quantities of computing equipment and how to setup advanced physical
    >> network structures...
    >> Hel... I haven't even seen a server blade throughout the entire
    >> course... I
    >> am very disappointed... And now I am sure every employer is going to
    >> expect
    >> me to be a IT guru for their firm on just about every little thing
    >> they can
    >> think of... I haven't seen any server rooms or been given any
    >> information about how much resources a computer/network needs to
    >> support 10 PCs... 100 PCs.... 1000 PCs... or 1 million... It seems
    >> like we just have to do things
    >> by trail and error... O and to ask you guyz for help which I have
    >> found very
    >> entertaining but not the most helpful advice I have seen...
    >>
    >> Happy New Year All and Keep Up The Fun.....
    >>
    >>

    >
    >




    --
    Rowdy Yates, MCNGP #39
    http://www.mcngp.com/
    "Shhhh... Do you smell that? I think is't Albanian Goat Smegma!"
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/
    http://www.geocities.com/rowdy_yates_mcngp/google.gif
    Rowdy Yates, Jan 5, 2005
    #18
  19. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    kpg Guest


    > *clap clap clap clap*
    >
    > my first clap of the new year....


    You should see a doctor right away.
    kpg, Jan 5, 2005
    #19
  20. =?Utf-8?B?Q2xpZmY=?=

    Ken Briscoe Guest

    In news:,
    kpg <> rambled:
    >
    >> *clap clap clap clap*
    >>
    >> my first clap of the new year....

    >
    > You should see a doctor right away.


    drip drip burn

    --

    KB - MCNGP "silent thug" #26

    Briscobar AT gmail DOT com

    www.mcngp.com will kill you! No, not! Only kidding!
    Ken Briscoe, Jan 5, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. psion
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    607
    =?ISO-8859-15?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=
    May 18, 2004
  2. jriegle

    Flash memory udeful life and data storage life

    jriegle, Oct 17, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    636
    jriegle
    Oct 17, 2003
  3. Koos Nolst Trenite
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    726
    Dale Houstman
    Aug 28, 2005
  4. =?Utf-8?B?bG9sbw==?=
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    764
    Kline Sphere
    Feb 22, 2007
  5. 88059355

    Life Balance Coaching: Balance Work And Life Like A Pro

    88059355, Jan 6, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    612
Loading...

Share This Page