Leica MP2 sells for $400,000 (I figured it out)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I couldn't figure it out. Paintings, furniture, cameras, knives,
    cars, guns; All items with great value owing to superior construction
    are fetching higher and higher prices these days. Yet during every
    previous recession, the sales of luxury goods have fallen. But now I
    know why. It isn't because thousands of now rich Chinese have entered
    the market (though that is part of it) it is because the production
    locations responsible for the superior products are going away. In 10
    years, there will be no more camera production in Japan or likely
    Germany. All of it will go to the Third World. And no matter what
    anyone tells you, this will result in a drop in quality. I think
    what is driving this boom in high-end product prices are perceived
    future scarcities and lack of any future production in areas known for
    quality.
    RichA, Dec 7, 2010
    #1
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  2. RichA

    John A. Guest

    On Mon, 6 Dec 2010 21:24:04 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    wrote:

    >I couldn't figure it out. Paintings, furniture, cameras, knives,
    >cars, guns; All items with great value owing to superior construction
    >are fetching higher and higher prices these days. Yet during every
    >previous recession, the sales of luxury goods have fallen. But now I
    >know why. It isn't because thousands of now rich Chinese have entered
    >the market (though that is part of it) it is because the production
    >locations responsible for the superior products are going away. In 10
    >years, there will be no more camera production in Japan or likely
    >Germany. All of it will go to the Third World. And no matter what
    >anyone tells you, this will result in a drop in quality. I think
    >what is driving this boom in high-end product prices are perceived
    >future scarcities and lack of any future production in areas known for
    >quality.


    "False Consensus"

    Even if you're right about future scarcity of quality goods, I don't
    think most people are paying that much attention.
    John A., Dec 7, 2010
    #2
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  3. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Dec 7, 2:36 am, John A. <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 6 Dec 2010 21:24:04 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I couldn't figure it out.  Paintings, furniture, cameras, knives,
    > >cars, guns;  All items with great value owing to superior construction
    > >are fetching higher and higher prices these days.  Yet during every
    > >previous recession, the sales of luxury goods have fallen.  But now I
    > >know why.  It isn't because thousands of now rich Chinese have entered
    > >the market (though that is part of it) it is because the production
    > >locations responsible for the superior products are going away.  In 10
    > >years, there will be no more camera production in Japan or likely
    > >Germany.  All of it will go to the Third World.  And no matter what
    > >anyone tells you, this will result in a drop in quality.  I  think
    > >what is driving this boom in high-end product prices are perceived
    > >future scarcities and lack of any future production in areas known for
    > >quality.

    >
    > "False Consensus"
    >
    > Even if you're right about future scarcity of quality goods, I don't
    > think most people are paying that much attention.


    No, just the people with the money to buy these things.
    RichA, Dec 7, 2010
    #3
  4. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Tue, 7 Dec 2010 05:23:43 -0800 (PST), RichA <> wrote:
    : On Dec 7, 2:36 am, John A. <> wrote:
    : > On Mon, 6 Dec 2010 21:24:04 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    : > wrote:
    : >
    : > >I couldn't figure it out.  Paintings, furniture, cameras, knives,
    : > >cars, guns;  All items with great value owing to superior construction
    : > >are fetching higher and higher prices these days.  Yet during every
    : > >previous recession, the sales of luxury goods have fallen.  But now I
    : > >know why.  It isn't because thousands of now rich Chinese have entered
    : > >the market (though that is part of it) it is because the production
    : > >locations responsible for the superior products are going away.  In 10
    : > >years, there will be no more camera production in Japan or likely
    : > >Germany.  All of it will go to the Third World.  And no matter what
    : > >anyone tells you, this will result in a drop in quality.  I  think
    : > >what is driving this boom in high-end product prices are perceived
    : > >future scarcities and lack of any future production in areas known for
    : > >quality.
    : >
    : > "False Consensus"
    : >
    : > Even if you're right about future scarcity of quality goods, I don't
    : > think most people are paying that much attention.
    :
    : No, just the people with the money to buy these things.

    Forgive me for being dense, Rich, but what does the Subject line of this
    thread have to do with any of the content posted so far?

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Dec 8, 2010
    #4
  5. RichA

    Bruce Guest

    Robert Coe <> wrote:
    >Forgive me for being dense, Rich, but what does the Subject line of this
    >thread have to do with any of the content posted so far?



    You expect too much from someone who is so unhinged. ;-)
    Bruce, Dec 8, 2010
    #5
  6. RichA

    Rich Guest

    On Dec 7, 9:26 pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 7 Dec 2010 05:23:43 -0800 (PST), RichA <> wrote:
    >
    > : On Dec 7, 2:36 am, John A. <> wrote:
    > : > On Mon, 6 Dec 2010 21:24:04 -0800 (PST), RichA <>: > wrote:
    >
    > : >
    > : > >I couldn't figure it out. Paintings, furniture, cameras, knives,
    > : > >cars, guns; All items with great value owing to superior construction
    > : > >are fetching higher and higher prices these days. Yet during every
    > : > >previous recession, the sales of luxury goods have fallen. But now I
    > : > >know why. It isn't because thousands of now rich Chinese have entered
    > : > >the market (though that is part of it) it is because the production
    > : > >locations responsible for the superior products are going away. In 10
    > : > >years, there will be no more camera production in Japan or likely
    > : > >Germany. All of it will go to the Third World. And no matter what
    > : > >anyone tells you, this will result in a drop in quality. I think
    > : > >what is driving this boom in high-end product prices are perceived
    > : > >future scarcities and lack of any future production in areas known for
    > : > >quality.
    > : >
    > : > "False Consensus"
    > : >
    > : > Even if you're right about future scarcity of quality goods, I don't
    > : > think most people are paying that much attention.
    > :
    > : No, just the people with the money to buy these things.
    >
    > Forgive me for being dense, Rich, but what does the Subject line of this
    > thread have to do with any of the content posted so far?
    >
    > Bob


    That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions. I offered what I
    believe is a reason why a trend was broken, because the sources for
    these goods are drying up. Once everything is made in China (or
    India) nothing will have the ultimate quality it once had. I've seen
    numerous examples of why this is the case and I think the increased
    scarcity or perceived future scarcity of these high-quality products
    is making their price immune to recessional factors.
    Rich, Dec 9, 2010
    #6
  7. RichA

    Bruce Guest

    Rich <> wrote:
    >
    >That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    >times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    >collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.



    That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    interest rates are at an all-time low. Usually, at this point the
    economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.

    In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.

    That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    all kinds are selling at silly high prices.

    I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have? ;-)
    Bruce, Dec 9, 2010
    #7
  8. RichA

    Rich Guest

    On Dec 9, 7:24 am, Bruce <> wrote:
    > Rich <> wrote:
    >
    > >That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    > >times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    > >collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.

    >
    > That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    > interest rates are at an all-time low.  Usually, at this point the
    > economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.
    >
    > In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    > the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    > savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.  
    >
    > That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    > all kinds are selling at silly high prices.
    >
    > I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    > just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have?  ;-)


    Do NOT sell any quality old manual lenses! When Canon and Nikon
    release mirror-less cameras, the prices on all of them will
    skyrocket. Someone already mentioned that about old Pentax 645 lenses
    and really, how many of those $10k digital 645's will they sell? Even
    with the micro 4/3rds (and now Sony NEX) I watched the price of a
    Schneider 25mm f0.95 CCTV lens (which I bought in new condition for
    $150) go from $400 to $700 to $1400 on Ebay. Of course, a new one is
    $2200...I blew out all my OM SLR lenses when digital hit in 2000 and
    that was a big mistake.
    Rich, Dec 9, 2010
    #8
  9. RichA

    Bruce Guest

    Rich <> wrote:
    >On Dec 9, 7:24 am, Bruce <> wrote:
    >> Rich <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    >> >times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    >> >collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.

    >>
    >> That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    >> interest rates are at an all-time low.  Usually, at this point the
    >> economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.
    >>
    >> In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    >> the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    >> savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.  
    >>
    >> That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    >> all kinds are selling at silly high prices.
    >>
    >> I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    >> just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have?  ;-)

    >
    >Do NOT sell any quality old manual lenses!



    I seriously considered selling all my Leica lenses except one because
    the money would buy me a new Leica M9 and two Carl Zeiss ZM lenses.
    That would give me my classic rangefinder outfit with 21mm (ZM), 35mm
    (ZM) and 90mm (Leica) lenses.


    >When Canon and Nikon
    >release mirror-less cameras, the prices on all of them will
    >skyrocket.



    Don't be ridiculous. Did the values of used OM lenses skyrocket when
    Four Thirds was introduced? Did they skyrocket when Micro Four Thirds
    was introduced? No, in both cases. Older lenses aren't much use
    because the wide angle lenses were very few and far between.


    >Someone already mentioned that about old Pentax 645 lenses
    >and really, how many of those $10k digital 645's will they sell?



    I bought several Pentax 645 lenses in anticipation of buying a 645D
    body, but changed my mind when I realised how little support the 645D
    would get from Pentax UK. After more than two decades of selling
    almost entirely to amateurs, Pentax UK cannot possibly support working
    photographers. So the 645D is no more than a pleasant toy for the
    well-heeled amateur.

    Instead, I bought the half share in a Hasselblad H3D-39 that I didn't
    already own. When a Hassy breaks, the support is magnificent.

    By the time I sold the 645 lenses the 645D was available, so I got
    more than double what I paid for them. ;-)


    >Even with the micro 4/3rds (and now Sony NEX) I watched the price of a
    >Schneider 25mm f0.95 CCTV lens (which I bought in new condition for
    >$150) go from $400 to $700 to $1400 on Ebay. Of course, a new one is
    >$2200...I blew out all my OM SLR lenses when digital hit in 2000 and
    >that was a big mistake.



    Why? What use would they be? Only a small number of pro grade lenses
    for the OM series were any good. The rest were consumer-grade, and
    the 2X focal length multiplier when used on (Micro) Four Thirds means
    that even the common wide angle OM Zuikos become telephoto lenses on
    the smaller format.

    People get very sentimental about the OM series, but when I changed
    from Olympus to Nikon back in the 1980s, I felt it was a step up.
    Otherwise, I would not have changed.
    Bruce, Dec 10, 2010
    #9
  10. RichA

    peter Guest

    On 12/9/2010 5:05 PM, Rich wrote:
    > On Dec 9, 7:24 am, Bruce<> wrote:
    >> Rich<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    >>> times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    >>> collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.

    >>
    >> That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    >> interest rates are at an all-time low. Usually, at this point the
    >> economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.
    >>
    >> In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    >> the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    >> savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.
    >>
    >> That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    >> all kinds are selling at silly high prices.
    >>
    >> I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    >> just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have? ;-)

    >
    > Do NOT sell any quality old manual lenses! When Canon and Nikon
    > release mirror-less cameras, the prices on all of them will
    > skyrocket. Someone already mentioned that about old Pentax 645 lenses
    > and really, how many of those $10k digital 645's will they sell? Even
    > with the micro 4/3rds (and now Sony NEX) I watched the price of a
    > Schneider 25mm f0.95 CCTV lens (which I bought in new condition for
    > $150) go from $400 to $700 to $1400 on Ebay. Of course, a new one is
    > $2200...I blew out all my OM SLR lenses when digital hit in 2000 and
    > that was a big mistake.


    Ah! now you are an economist.

    BTW why didn't you answer my prior questions.

    --
    Peter
    peter, Dec 10, 2010
    #10
  11. RichA

    Rich Guest

    On Dec 10, 8:30 am, peter <> wrote:
    > On 12/9/2010 5:05 PM, Rich wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Dec 9, 7:24 am, Bruce<>  wrote:
    > >> Rich<>  wrote:

    >
    > >>> That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    > >>> times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    > >>> collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.

    >
    > >> That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    > >> interest rates are at an all-time low.  Usually, at this point the
    > >> economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.

    >
    > >> In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    > >> the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    > >> savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.

    >
    > >> That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    > >> all kinds are selling at silly high prices.

    >
    > >> I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    > >> just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have?  ;-)

    >
    > > Do NOT sell any quality old manual lenses!  When Canon and Nikon
    > > release mirror-less cameras, the prices on all of them will
    > > skyrocket.  Someone already mentioned that about old Pentax 645 lenses
    > > and really, how many of those $10k digital 645's will they sell?  Even
    > > with the micro 4/3rds (and now Sony NEX) I watched the price of a
    > > Schneider 25mm f0.95 CCTV lens (which I bought in new condition for
    > > $150) go from $400 to $700 to $1400 on Ebay.  Of course, a new one is
    > > $2200...I blew out all my OM SLR lenses when digital hit in 2000 and
    > > that was a big mistake.

    >
    > Ah! now you are an economist.


    As a matter of fact...
    Rich, Dec 11, 2010
    #11
  12. RichA

    Rich Guest

    On Dec 9, 7:15 pm, Bruce <> wrote:
    > Rich <> wrote:
    > >On Dec 9, 7:24 am, Bruce <> wrote:
    > >> Rich <> wrote:

    >
    > >> >That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    > >> >times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    > >> >collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.

    >
    > >> That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    > >> interest rates are at an all-time low. Usually, at this point the
    > >> economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.

    >
    > >> In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    > >> the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    > >> savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.

    >
    > >> That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    > >> all kinds are selling at silly high prices.

    >
    > >> I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    > >> just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have? ;-)

    >
    > >Do NOT sell any quality old manual lenses!  

    >
    > I seriously considered selling all my Leica lenses except one because
    > the money would buy me a new Leica M9 and two Carl Zeiss ZM lenses.
    > That would give me my classic rangefinder outfit with 21mm (ZM), 35mm
    > (ZM) and 90mm (Leica) lenses.
    >
    > >When Canon and Nikon
    > >release mirror-less cameras, the prices on all of them will
    > >skyrocket.  

    >
    > Don't be ridiculous.  Did the values of used OM lenses skyrocket when
    > Four Thirds was introduced?  Did they skyrocket when Micro Four Thirds
    > was introduced?


    Yes, to both questions. 5 years ago, an Olympus 180mm f2.8 could be
    had for $150 on Ebay, if one turns up, check what the cost is now.
    Much of the demand was, however, driven by Canon FF users looking for
    decent
    wide angle primes. Olympus 18mm f3.5 lenses went over $1000 each long
    ago.


    > >Someone already mentioned that about old Pentax 645 lenses
    > >and really, how many of those $10k digital 645's will they sell?  

    >
    > I bought several Pentax 645 lenses in anticipation of buying a 645D
    > body, but changed my mind when I realised how little support the 645D
    > would get from Pentax UK.  After more than two decades of selling
    > almost entirely to amateurs, Pentax UK cannot possibly support working
    > photographers.  So the 645D is no more than a pleasant toy for the
    > well-heeled amateur.


    I heard the legacy lenses do not work as well as the new ones, so some
    won't want to hobble the camera. But if I had a choice between it and
    the Nikon D3x for quality static shots, I'd go with the Pentax.
    >
    > Instead, I bought the half share in a Hasselblad H3D-39 that I didn't
    > already own.  When a Hassy breaks, the support is magnificent.


    So I've heard.

    > By the time I sold the 645 lenses the 645D was available, so I got
    > more than double what I paid for them.  ;-)


    So they did rise in value.


    > >Even with the micro 4/3rds (and now Sony NEX) I watched the price of a
    > >Schneider 25mm f0.95 CCTV lens (which I bought in new condition for
    > >$150) go from $400 to $700 to $1400 on Ebay.  Of course, a new one is
    > >$2200...I blew out all my OM SLR lenses when digital hit in 2000 and
    > >that was a big mistake.

    >
    > Why?  What use would they be?  


    Low light. Like using 100 ISO (kind of a must on a 4/3rds sensor) at
    night in a city.

    >Only a small number of pro grade lenses
    > for the OM series were any good.  The rest were consumer-grade, and
    > the 2X focal length multiplier when used on (Micro) Four Thirds means
    > that even the common wide angle OM Zuikos become telephoto lenses on
    > the smaller format.


    Many of the OM lenses produce good results, but Olympus was realistic
    and suggested at least a stop down for digital use. They even had a
    chart. But check out the price of 90mm f2.0 OM macros, 100mm f2.0
    primes on Ebay. Check out the price of the old OM 24mm T-S lens.
    About par or higher with the brand new Canon and most of the buyers of
    the lens ARE Canon users! Because the lens was superb.

    >
    > People get very sentimental about the OM series, but when I changed
    > from Olympus to Nikon back in the 1980s, I felt it was a step up.
    > Otherwise, I would not have changed.


    Sure they are. Because you could shoot two stops slower than with
    Nikon FM and FE's and get images as sharp because it had such a soft
    shutter and mirror slap. Olympus had compactness, decent build,
    better lenses than most, including Nikon and Canon and they cost
    slightly less.
    Rich, Dec 11, 2010
    #12
  13. RichA

    Bruce Guest

    Rich <> wrote:
    >On Dec 9, 7:15 pm, Bruce <> wrote:
    >> Rich <> wrote:
    >> >On Dec 9, 7:24 am, Bruce <> wrote:
    >> >> Rich <> wrote:

    >>
    >> >> >That unlike in other recessions, things like the Leica selling for 5
    >> >> >times beyond its expected price is unusual. Luxury goods and
    >> >> >collectible sales and prices suffer in recessions.

    >>
    >> >> That's because this recession differs from almost all others in that
    >> >> interest rates are at an all-time low. Usually, at this point the
    >> >> economic cycle, interest rates are near their peak.

    >>
    >> >> In these conditions, people with cash to invest are not satisfied with
    >> >> the return on their savings from conventional investments, especially
    >> >> savings accounts, so they look for alternative investments.

    >>
    >> >> That's why gold prices are at an all-time high and why collectables of
    >> >> all kinds are selling at silly high prices.

    >>
    >> >> I keep thinking about selling some or all of my Leica lenses but they
    >> >> just keep rising in value - the best investment I could have? ;-)

    >>
    >> >Do NOT sell any quality old manual lenses!  

    >>
    >> I seriously considered selling all my Leica lenses except one because
    >> the money would buy me a new Leica M9 and two Carl Zeiss ZM lenses.
    >> That would give me my classic rangefinder outfit with 21mm (ZM), 35mm
    >> (ZM) and 90mm (Leica) lenses.
    >>
    >> >When Canon and Nikon
    >> >release mirror-less cameras, the prices on all of them will
    >> >skyrocket.  

    >>
    >> Don't be ridiculous.  Did the values of used OM lenses skyrocket when
    >> Four Thirds was introduced?  Did they skyrocket when Micro Four Thirds
    >> was introduced?

    >
    >Yes, to both questions. 5 years ago, an Olympus 180mm f2.8 could be
    >had for $150 on Ebay, if one turns up, check what the cost is now.
    >Much of the demand was, however, driven by Canon FF users looking for
    >decent
    >wide angle primes. Olympus 18mm f3.5 lenses went over $1000 each long
    >ago.



    So I was right. It had nothing to do with Four Thirds.

    The Canon 5D thrived on older, classic lenses used with adapters. I
    had two 5Ds, a couple of Canon zooms and the rest of my outfit was
    Contax and Nikon glass with adapters. It made it very easy to change
    back to Nikon when I got the D700; by them I only had three Contax
    lenses and all my other primes were Nikkors.


    >> >Someone already mentioned that about old Pentax 645 lenses
    >> >and really, how many of those $10k digital 645's will they sell?  

    >>
    >> I bought several Pentax 645 lenses in anticipation of buying a 645D
    >> body, but changed my mind when I realised how little support the 645D
    >> would get from Pentax UK.  After more than two decades of selling
    >> almost entirely to amateurs, Pentax UK cannot possibly support working
    >> photographers.  So the 645D is no more than a pleasant toy for the
    >> well-heeled amateur.

    >
    >I heard the legacy lenses do not work as well as the new ones, so some
    >won't want to hobble the camera. But if I had a choice between it and
    >the Nikon D3x for quality static shots, I'd go with the Pentax.
    >>
    >> Instead, I bought the half share in a Hasselblad H3D-39 that I didn't
    >> already own.  When a Hassy breaks, the support is magnificent.

    >
    >So I've heard.
    >
    >> By the time I sold the 645 lenses the 645D was available, so I got
    >> more than double what I paid for them.  ;-)

    >
    >So they did rise in value.



    I bought them from a bankruptcy sale and sold them at a good price.

    Since I stopped shooting weddings I have had more time to find some
    great deals on equipment, and I took an opportunity to take over a
    share in a camera store from the partner who wanted to retire. It had
    to wait for the sale of my interest in a minilab to be completed,
    which took months, plus the sale of most of my Alpa and Angenieux
    collections, which I am going to miss, but I'm really enjoying being
    involved in retail again.


    >> >Even with the micro 4/3rds (and now Sony NEX) I watched the price of a
    >> >Schneider 25mm f0.95 CCTV lens (which I bought in new condition for
    >> >$150) go from $400 to $700 to $1400 on Ebay.  Of course, a new one is
    >> >$2200...I blew out all my OM SLR lenses when digital hit in 2000 and
    >> >that was a big mistake.

    >>
    >> Why?  What use would they be?  

    >
    >Low light. Like using 100 ISO (kind of a must on a 4/3rds sensor) at
    >night in a city.



    Don't you have a tripod?


    >>Only a small number of pro grade lenses
    >> for the OM series were any good.  The rest were consumer-grade, and
    >> the 2X focal length multiplier when used on (Micro) Four Thirds means
    >> that even the common wide angle OM Zuikos become telephoto lenses on
    >> the smaller format.

    >
    >Many of the OM lenses produce good results, but Olympus was realistic
    >and suggested at least a stop down for digital use. They even had a
    >chart. But check out the price of 90mm f2.0 OM macros, 100mm f2.0
    >primes on Ebay. Check out the price of the old OM 24mm T-S lens.
    >About par or higher with the brand new Canon and most of the buyers of
    >the lens ARE Canon users! Because the lens was superb.



    Once again, it has nothing to do with Four Thirds and everything to do
    with the fabulously versatile Canon EF mount. That's one thing I
    miss after changing from the 5D - there are very few other-mount
    lenses that work on the Nikon F mount, although I'm having fun trying
    out some Leica R lenses on the D3.


    >> People get very sentimental about the OM series, but when I changed
    >> from Olympus to Nikon back in the 1980s, I felt it was a step up.
    >> Otherwise, I would not have changed.

    >
    >Sure they are. Because you could shoot two stops slower than with
    >Nikon FM and FE's and get images as sharp because it had such a soft
    >shutter and mirror slap. Olympus had compactness, decent build,
    >better lenses than most, including Nikon and Canon and they cost
    >slightly less.



    My first Nikon body was an F. When the shutter went off, it scared
    any birds within a 200 metre radius. It was probably of interest to
    seismologists who could trace the whereabouts of Nikon F users with
    their seismographs. It lasted only a few weeks - I'm sure it was
    giving me arthritis, it was so darn heavy. ;-)

    My second Nikon body was an FE2. I've owned most of the manual focus
    Nikon bodies and the FE2 was the sweetest by far. I still have one
    now - I occasionally use it with a 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor to shoot
    buildings in black and white for limited edition prints. Most of
    those are shot with Leica lenses, but there is something unique about
    the signature of that 50mm f/1.8 AIS. It has the same optics as the
    Series E version.
    Bruce, Dec 11, 2010
    #13
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