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Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by pcwiznot@mchsi.com, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I'm 56 years old and I work as a mechanic, I make almost 11.00 an hour.
    My problem is I cant take much more of working outside in this heat. I'm
    trying to learn,assimulate, cram as much learning as I can to become a
    tech working in a computer shop. I work [free] after hours helping and
    watching a computer tech,work on computers. I read constantly. My
    problem is I cant afford to go to school, for this. I take on computers
    of friends to fix, I build computers, do you computer tech guys think I
    could ever learn enough, to actually have job at this. Someday I'd like
    to take the a+ exam, maybe? Im sorry for being long winded.
    signed
    , Aug 30, 2007
    #1
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  2. Bill Eitner Guest

    wrote:
    > I'm 56 years old and I work as a mechanic, I make almost 11.00 an hour.


    That seems low for a mechanic.
    Of course I'm in California where the pay rates are relatively
    high. For example, union scale for an automotive mechanic is
    around $30/hour. My brother is 50 and overweight. He works
    as a mechanic at a non-union shop where he can work at a more
    relaxed pace. He currently makes $18/hour and is likely to
    ask for a raise to $20-$25 by next year or go somewhere else.

    Perhaps looking for a better mechanic job might be wise.

    > My problem is I cant take much more of working outside in this heat.


    What are your prospects for retirement? If you only have
    9 years or even 11 years left before full Social Security,
    you may have to just stick it out like my father did. He
    was a mechanic and wanted to retire at 58, but he hung on
    until 65. His last two jobs were civil service (county and
    city). Those jobs didn't pay as well as the prior union
    jobs, but they were more comfortable physically and had
    decent benefits.

    > I'm
    > trying to learn,assimulate, cram as much learning as I can to become a
    > tech working in a computer shop.


    At your age it may have to be your own shop or at-home
    business. There's nothing stopping you from advertising
    and getting that started now. The only problem is that
    under the table side jobs don't contribute to your Social
    Security benefit. Eventually you have to make the business
    legitimate or stay with a regular job up to retirement.

    > I work [free] after hours helping and
    > watching a computer tech,work on computers. I read constantly. My
    > problem is I cant afford to go to school, for this.


    I'm doing it with library books. It takes discipline to
    set aside the time and stick with it, but it can be done.
    There are online resources for extra practice test questions
    when you feel you're getting close (hitting 85% or better
    on the practice tests that come with the books).

    Also, there's something called WIA (Workforce Investment Act).
    It amounts to federal money for training. Do some research
    into it and you may be able to find a WIA subsidized A+
    program in your area. There may be some other kind of
    program you can make use of as well. ROP (Regional
    Occupational Program) comes to mind. Look into it. There
    has to be some kind of social/human services department
    at your county center.

    Ask for/seek whatever help you can find. You may end up going
    in some other direction. For example, truck driving is
    physically easier than being a mechanic in the heat. Further,
    it shouldn't be too tough to beat $11/hour. All I can think
    is that there must be some strange circumstances behind making
    only $11 an hour as a mechanic out in the heat.

    Another resource is Matthew Lesko. Look for his books when
    you're looking for A+ books in your local library system.
    His material is good for turning special (and seemingly
    unfortunate) circumstances into free money for training and/or
    starting a business.

    > I take on computers
    > of friends to fix, I build computers, do you computer tech guys think I
    > could ever learn enough, to actually have job at this.


    That's hard for me to say. I'm 43. Learning stuff is harder
    for me than it was 25 years ago. A lot of booze and meth under
    the bridge in that time. That's my story. I've pissed away
    25 years pretty much living to suit myself. Before I started
    this (training for a new career) I took an online IQ test to
    reassure myself that I was still pretty sharp. The overall
    test result was 135. 100 is considered average. I was ahead
    of the intelligence curve years ago because I was offered a
    chance to skip from 6th grade to 9th grade. It didn't happen
    because my parents said no, but the point is that the
    intellectual capacity was there. There's no way for people
    here to know what your intellectual capacity might be.

    If you're competent and disciplined, you can always fix/build
    computers on the side and eventually grow that into a legitimate
    business. You don't need an A+ or other certifications to work
    with computers just like you don't need ASE certifications to
    work on cars. They are proof of competence to show to others.
    You don't need them to prove anything to yourself. You know
    whether or not you can handle the work. Making money doing it
    makes you a professional. Success or failure in business is
    the real test.

    > Someday I'd like
    > to take the a+ exam, maybe?


    Have you looked into it at all? Do you know that the 2003
    tests have been superseded by 2006 tests? That means the
    books covering the 2003 tests, which are still useful, are
    basically valueless. I remember someone here saying
    something to the effect that if a person can handle the
    2003 tests they will have an easier time with the 2006
    tests. My point is you should be able to find 2003 books
    with their associated disks in libraries for free loan or
    for sale for next to nothing.

    Another thing to think about is the testing costs. There
    are two tests and each is over $100. A major benefit of
    a subsidized training program is that the cost of books
    and tests is saved. For me, setting aside the time to
    home study is a challenge. A scheduled class is much
    better for me. A subsidized class is perfect for me as
    it deals with both the time discipline issue and the
    cost issue. But that's just me. Your situation may
    dictate a different approach.

    In a nutshell, there are variables involved in this that
    you have to examine and work out in a way that best suits
    your situation.

    > Im sorry for being long winded.
    > signed


    Good luck,

    Bill Eitner
    Bill Eitner, Aug 30, 2007
    #2
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