Learn from the Best Photographers in the World. We have DVDs.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by v33video@gmail.com, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    If you have a passion for photography, why not learn from the BEST? We
    have the following DVDs at ATTRACTIVE discounted rates. Better prices
    than what the others are selling at!

    We have:

    1. Gary Fong: How to Get Rich As a Photographer
    2. Mike Colon: Reaching the High-End Bride DVD
    3. Gino Lucadamo (all 5 volumes)
    4. Jerry Ghionis (all 3 volumes)
    5. Dean Colins
    6. Masters of Wedding Photography 1 & 2
    7. Joe Buissink DVD: Defining the Moment
    8. Bambi Cantrell : The Definitive Guide to Comtemporary Wedding
    Photography
    9. How to Photograph the Bride Alone Flow Posing
    10. How to Photograph the Bride and Groom Flow Posing
    11. Ryan Schembri Debut
    12. Ryan Schembri Freaking Out in Photoshop
    13. Guy Gowan Adobe Photoshop Cosmetic Technique

    Please visit our site for more visuals and information. We deliver
    worldwide :)

    http://www.veevideo.com
     
    , Feb 21, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. John Navas Guest

    Spam alert. Complaint sent to Google Mail.

    --
    Best regards,
    John Navas
    Panasonic DMC-FZ8 (and several others)
     
    John Navas, Feb 21, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guest

    On Feb 21, 12:03 am, John Navas <> wrote:
    > Spam alert. Complaint sent to Google Mail.
    >
    > --
    > Best regards,
    > John Navas
    > Panasonic DMC-FZ8 (and several others)


    This post is illegal merchandise.

    Everyone knows that www.veevideo.com is selling pirated Videos
    illegally.

    Rest assured that if you are buying anything from this immoral company
    you are not getting the real product.

    If you wish to buy any of these products please respect copyright and
    go directly to the sellers of these copyrighted materials.

    www.VeeVideo.com is the worst thing for our industry and will pay
    heavy fines in the end. They are being pursued aggressively for their
    actions.

    The Digital Wedding Pro series can only be purchased directly from
    www.digitalweddingpro.com

    Allison Lee
    Marketing Manager
    www.digitalweddingpro.com
     
    , Feb 21, 2008
    #3
  4. > This post is illegal merchandise.
    >
    > Everyone knows that www.veevideo.com is selling pirated Videos
    > illegally.
    >
    > Rest assured that if you are buying anything from this immoral
    > company you are not getting the real product.
    >
    > If you wish to buy any of these products please respect
    > copyright and go directly to the sellers of these copyrighted
    > materials.
    >
    > www.VeeVideo.com is the worst thing for our industry and will
    > pay heavy fines in the end. They are being pursued
    > aggressively for their actions.
    >
    > The Digital Wedding Pro series can only be purchased directly
    > from www.digitalweddingpro.com
    >
    > Allison Lee
    > Marketing Manager
    > www.digitalweddingpro.com
    >

    I do not know anything about this particular "service" but I have
    been an "avid" fighter of piracy since my days of writing
    shareware for the Apple ][ on CompuServe and for DOS 4.0 on a PC.
    I figured if I didn't want my work stolen, I shouldn't steal
    others so I simply don't.

    It may be naive, but I still have the romantic view that if more
    people obeyed copyrights on music and movies, we'd not have
    nearly as high prices on CDs and DVDs, which are rising fast, nor
    would there be a war between the IP owners and the pirates as
    well as them who sell ripping or copying software. Too often, the
    sophisticated copy protection causes legit buyers angst.

    I strongly believe the same would be true of software such as
    Windows and so many apps and utilites that use some version of
    activation. Again, if we all bought what we use, I think prices
    could drop because less resources would be devoted to fighting
    the pirates and I think the software would be less buggy because
    side-effect bugs from the copy protection or false positives from
    things like Windoes Genuine Advantage or whatever. And, it would
    allow buyers to use their copyright law guaranteed right to copy
    ONE disc as a backup as well as allow legit buyers the
    flexibility to reinstall when necessary or move - NOT copy - from
    one PC to another.

    I'd be interested in your views on this, and others views.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
     
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 21, 2008
    #4
  5. John Navas Guest

    On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 12:57:38 GMT, "HEMI - Powered" <> wrote
    in <Xns9A4B50FF8D7BBReplyScoreID@140.99.99.130>:

    >I do not know anything about this particular "service" but I have
    >been an "avid" fighter of piracy since my days of writing
    >shareware for the Apple ][ on CompuServe and for DOS 4.0 on a PC.
    >I figured if I didn't want my work stolen, I shouldn't steal
    >others so I simply don't.


    Likewise, all the way back to mainframe software..

    >It may be naive, but I still have the romantic view that if more
    >people obeyed copyrights on music and movies, we'd not have
    >nearly as high prices on CDs and DVDs, which are rising fast, nor
    >would there be a war between the IP owners and the pirates as
    >well as them who sell ripping or copying software. Too often, the
    >sophisticated copy protection causes legit buyers angst.


    My take is quite different -- while I don't condone infringement,
    I think the practices of copyright owners are also to blame for the
    widespread disrespect of copyrights, and that if copyright owners were
    more reasonable and respectful of their customers, there would be far
    less infringement. I'm particularly incensed by increases in length of
    copyright protection, which I think are unfair, unreasonable, and
    contrary to the whole notion of copyright protection, not to mention
    having nothing to do with piracy.

    >I strongly believe the same would be true of software such as
    >Windows and so many apps and utilites that use some version of
    >activation.


    Again, my take is quite different -- I think the practices of software
    publishers are also to blame, notably the lack of quality, no right of
    return, and disclaimers of warranty coverage. Way too many companies
    are knowingly shipping crap because they know they can get away with it.
    When you don't respect your customers, don't expect them to respect you.

    >Again, if we all bought what we use, I think prices
    >could drop because less resources would be devoted to fighting
    >the pirates


    I seriously doubt that. In fact, I think prices would tend to rise
    simply because piracy, like it or not, acts to keep prices down.

    >and I think the software would be less buggy because
    >side-effect bugs from the copy protection or false positives from
    >things like Windoes Genuine Advantage or whatever.


    Again, I doubt it. As an active beta tester I know for a fact that many
    companies deliberately ship products with known bugs, some of which are
    quite serious.

    >And, it would
    >allow buyers to use their copyright law guaranteed right to copy
    >ONE disc as a backup as well as allow legit buyers the
    >flexibility to reinstall when necessary or move - NOT copy - from
    >one PC to another.


    I see no evidence that copyright holders would be more reasonable in
    their behavior. If anything, just the opposite.

    >I'd be interested in your views on this, and others views.


    --
    Best regards,
    John Navas
    Panasonic DMC-FZ8 (and several others)
     
    John Navas, Feb 21, 2008
    #5
  6. Mr. Strat Guest

    In article
    <>,
    <> wrote:

    > 1. Gary Fong: How to Get Rich As a Photographer
    > 2. Mike Colon: Reaching the High-End Bride DVD
    > 3. Gino Lucadamo (all 5 volumes)
    > 4. Jerry Ghionis (all 3 volumes)
    > 5. Dean Colins
    > 6. Masters of Wedding Photography 1 & 2
    > 7. Joe Buissink DVD: Defining the Moment
    > 8. Bambi Cantrell : The Definitive Guide to Comtemporary Wedding
    > Photography
    > 9. How to Photograph the Bride Alone Flow Posing
    > 10. How to Photograph the Bride and Groom Flow Posing
    > 11. Ryan Schembri Debut
    > 12. Ryan Schembri Freaking Out in Photoshop
    > 13. Guy Gowan Adobe Photoshop Cosmetic Technique


    Gary Fong I've heard of, and years ago I met Dean Collins. But he's
    dead now. Never heard of the rest of them.
     
    Mr. Strat, Feb 21, 2008
    #6
  7. John Navas added these comments in the current discussion du
    jour ...

    >>It may be naive, but I still have the romantic view that if
    >>more people obeyed copyrights on music and movies, we'd not
    >>have nearly as high prices on CDs and DVDs, which are rising
    >>fast, nor would there be a war between the IP owners and the
    >>pirates as well as them who sell ripping or copying software.
    >>Too often, the sophisticated copy protection causes legit
    >>buyers angst.

    >
    > My take is quite different -- while I don't condone
    > infringement, I think the practices of copyright owners are
    > also to blame for the widespread disrespect of copyrights, and
    > that if copyright owners were more reasonable and respectful
    > of their customers, there would be far less infringement. I'm
    > particularly incensed by increases in length of copyright
    > protection, which I think are unfair, unreasonable, and
    > contrary to the whole notion of copyright protection, not to
    > mention having nothing to do with piracy.


    I don't think your view is inconsistent with mine, John. In fact,
    I fully agree with you. Maybe the answer is a reasonable set of
    actions and rules from both the IP owners and the customers to
    each respect the other's rights, responsibilities, convience,
    right to earn a living, right to have reasonable prices, etc.

    >>I strongly believe the same would be true of software such as
    >>Windows and so many apps and utilites that use some version of
    >>activation.

    >
    > Again, my take is quite different -- I think the practices of
    > software publishers are also to blame, notably the lack of
    > quality, no right of return, and disclaimers of warranty
    > coverage. Way too many companies are knowingly shipping crap
    > because they know they can get away with it. When you don't
    > respect your customers, don't expect them to respect you.


    Same thing. If stores and SW houses allowed returns of
    unprotected SW, then the remaining "pirates", i.e., us little
    guys, would possibly/probably copy the CD/DVD and return the SW,
    mighten they? Now, disclaiming warranty and bullshit EULA, yet
    that is nonsense. In fact, a EULA is enforceable in court, to
    some degree, but isn't a fully valid contract because the user
    has no right to negotiate and must fully agree or not be able to
    use the product. Again, reasonableness on both sides is necessary
    until each has the confidence that the other isn't out to screw
    them or jerk them around. So, I fully agree with you here also.

    >>Again, if we all bought what we use, I think prices
    >>could drop because less resources would be devoted to fighting
    >> the pirates

    >
    > I seriously doubt that. In fact, I think prices would tend to
    > rise simply because piracy, like it or not, acts to keep
    > prices down.


    How does piracy keep prices down? I know someone, a relative, who
    has 100% warez bootleg SW on his PC. That tends to drive prices
    up IMO because the developers want a set level of return on
    investment - although it may be UNreasonable to the customer at
    today's prices - so they will jack up the price to cover the
    perceived piracy. Now, if the threat is unfounded, then your
    point is probably more valid than mine.

    >>and I think the software would be less buggy because
    >>side-effect bugs from the copy protection or false positives
    >>from things like Windoes Genuine Advantage or whatever.

    >
    > Again, I doubt it. As an active beta tester I know for a fact
    > that many companies deliberately ship products with known
    > bugs, some of which are quite serious.


    You and I go way back, John, as you illustrated above. And, I
    know from personal experience with software for many years,
    including the early copy protection on the Apple, that it makes
    the programmers job much more difficult and adds code/complexity
    which makes alpha and beta testing more of a challenge. It CAN be
    done, as you comment on, but what then explains the rising bugs
    as more and more activation and other crap goes on, in addition
    to more glitz and shorter debug time? The less crap code not
    related to the purpose of the product means less bloat, faster
    execution, faster installs, and in my experience (admittedly
    older than yours) more chance for side-effect bugs to slip by.

    >>And, it would
    >>allow buyers to use their copyright law guaranteed right to
    >>copy ONE disc as a backup as well as allow legit buyers the
    >>flexibility to reinstall when necessary or move - NOT copy -
    >>from one PC to another.

    >
    > I see no evidence that copyright holders would be more
    > reasonable in their behavior. If anything, just the opposite.


    Well, as things stand now, you're right. But, just like the
    Israelis and Palistinians, at some point, you HAVE to negotiate.
    Doesn't mean there's a peace treaty at the first Camp David
    meeting or even after 10-20 years, but for both the IP owners and
    the customers, a new paradigm is needed. As I mentioned above,
    each "side" has to be willing to give a little to get a little
    until the escalation in prices and piracy becomes de-escalation.
    I doubt that's easy and may not happen in my lifetime, but I feel
    that we'll never know if the SW and music/movie industry doesn't
    use some sort of focus groups, panels, town halls, something to
    get more in tune and in touch with their customers and be less
    arogant. And, customers have to show their honesty more than I
    perceive they are.

    So, while you may disagree with me, I do not disagree that much
    with you. I think you have many valid points and we should
    combine our ideas somehow.

    Have a great day!

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
     
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 21, 2008
    #7
  8. John Navas Guest

    On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 18:00:45 GMT, "HEMI - Powered" <> wrote
    in <Xns9A4B8463511A7ReplyScoreID@140.99.99.130>:

    >John Navas added these comments in the current discussion du
    >jour ...


    >> I seriously doubt that. In fact, I think prices would tend to
    >> rise simply because piracy, like it or not, acts to keep
    >> prices down.


    >How does piracy keep prices down? I know someone, a relative, who
    >has 100% warez bootleg SW on his PC. That tends to drive prices
    >up IMO because the developers want a set level of return on
    >investment - although it may be UNreasonable to the customer at
    >today's prices - so they will jack up the price to cover the
    >perceived piracy. Now, if the threat is unfounded, then your
    >point is probably more valid than mine.


    I think piracy keeps prices down because (a) copyright is a legal
    monopoly and (b) lower prices serve to discourage piracy, as I've seen
    firsthand. For example, if a kid has to shell out $18 for a CD just to
    get one cut he likes, then he's more likely to forego purchase and just
    copy it. Make that one cut easily available for purchase at $1, or drop
    the entire CD price down to $10, and he's more likely to buy it.

    I think it's a mistake to assume that piracy somehow has any real effect
    on rate of return on investment -- there's no real evidence I know of
    that any significant amount of piracy gets turned into increased sales
    sufficient to offset the increased costs by copy protection. As pirates
    often say, they just wouldn't be buying it.

    Why then do copyright holders pursue copy protection? I think it's out
    of a misplaced desire for control, in the hope of increasing revenue,
    often by outrageous double-dipping. Why should a consumer that's bought
    a CD have to pay again to have a ring tone of one of the cuts? Yet
    that's just what the music giants want, and piracy has nothing to do
    with it.

    Economics teaches that competition drives prices down toward marginal
    cost, but that doesn't apply to copyright since it's a legal monopoly,
    and there often aren't real substitutes.

    >> Again, I doubt it. As an active beta tester I know for a fact
    >> that many companies deliberately ship products with known
    >> bugs, some of which are quite serious.

    >
    >You and I go way back, John, as you illustrated above. And, I
    >know from personal experience with software for many years,
    >including the early copy protection on the Apple, that it makes
    >the programmers job much more difficult and adds code/complexity
    >which makes alpha and beta testing more of a challenge. It CAN be
    >done, as you comment on, but what then explains the rising bugs
    >as more and more activation and other crap goes on, in addition
    >to more glitz and shorter debug time? The less crap code not
    >related to the purpose of the product means less bloat, faster
    >execution, faster installs, and in my experience (admittedly
    >older than yours) more chance for side-effect bugs to slip by.


    My own take is that copy protection is only a minor factor in this mess,
    that the major factors are massive code bloat, excessive complexity,
    feature creep, poor quality management, and more concern with getting it
    out the door than with getting it out the door right.

    One case in point is Adobe Photoshop Elements 6, where Adobe has
    actually said it delayed writing all the help and documentation until
    after the code was written so that implementation could keep changing
    until the last minute. Yikes! My take as a software quality
    professional is that's absolutely the wrong way to go about it,
    effectively backwards. The right way is to design the app properly,
    with built-in quality, document it, and only then write the code, which
    takes much less time and comes out with much better quality.

    Older experience than me? My first code was written in 1960. ;)
    You?

    >> I see no evidence that copyright holders would be more
    >> reasonable in their behavior. If anything, just the opposite.

    >
    >Well, as things stand now, you're right. But, just like the
    >Israelis and Palistinians, at some point, you HAVE to negotiate.
    >Doesn't mean there's a peace treaty at the first Camp David
    >meeting or even after 10-20 years, but for both the IP owners and
    >the customers, a new paradigm is needed. As I mentioned above,
    >each "side" has to be willing to give a little to get a little
    >until the escalation in prices and piracy becomes de-escalation.


    I don't see this as customers having to give a little -- they've lost
    too much already. I think what's needed is a return to a level playing
    field -- the balance has tilted way too much toward copyright holders,
    which I think has actually exacerbated the problem.

    >I doubt that's easy and may not happen in my lifetime, but I feel
    >that we'll never know if the SW and music/movie industry doesn't
    >use some sort of focus groups, panels, town halls, something to
    >get more in tune and in touch with their customers and be less
    >arogant.


    I agree.

    >And, customers have to show their honesty more than I
    >perceive they are.


    I think customers are basically honest, but perceive they are being
    screwed, so bend the rules more than they normally would.

    >So, while you may disagree with me, I do not disagree that much
    >with you. I think you have many valid points and we should
    >combine our ideas somehow.


    Agreed.

    >Have a great day!


    You too!

    --
    Best regards,
    John Navas
    Panasonic DMC-FZ8 (and several others)
     
    John Navas, Feb 21, 2008
    #8
  9. Mr. Strat Guest

    In article <>, John Navas
    <> wrote:

    > One case in point is Adobe Photoshop Elements 6, where Adobe has
    > actually said it delayed writing all the help and documentation until
    > after the code was written so that implementation could keep changing
    > until the last minute. Yikes! My take as a software quality
    > professional is that's absolutely the wrong way to go about it,
    > effectively backwards. The right way is to design the app properly,
    > with built-in quality, document it, and only then write the code, which
    > takes much less time and comes out with much better quality.


    A software quality control professional?

    Oh, that's hysterical!
     
    Mr. Strat, Feb 21, 2008
    #9
  10. George Kerby Guest

    On 2/21/08 11:05 AM, in article 210220080905234734%,
    "Mr. Strat" <> wrote:

    > In article
    > <>,
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> 1. Gary Fong: How to Get Rich As a Photographer
    >> 2. Mike Colon: Reaching the High-End Bride DVD
    >> 3. Gino Lucadamo (all 5 volumes)
    >> 4. Jerry Ghionis (all 3 volumes)
    >> 5. Dean Colins
    >> 6. Masters of Wedding Photography 1 & 2
    >> 7. Joe Buissink DVD: Defining the Moment
    >> 8. Bambi Cantrell : The Definitive Guide to Comtemporary Wedding
    >> Photography
    >> 9. How to Photograph the Bride Alone Flow Posing
    >> 10. How to Photograph the Bride and Groom Flow Posing
    >> 11. Ryan Schembri Debut
    >> 12. Ryan Schembri Freaking Out in Photoshop
    >> 13. Guy Gowan Adobe Photoshop Cosmetic Technique

    >
    > Gary Fong I've heard of, and years ago I met Dean Collins. But he's
    > dead now. Never heard of the rest of them.

    But a guy named 'colon' talking about reaching for something might be
    interesting...
     
    George Kerby, Feb 21, 2008
    #10
  11. John Navas added these comments in the current discussion du
    jour ...

    John, I've very much enjoyed discussing this topic with you as I
    did the DVD-R and +R differences. I have learned a lot from you
    and I respect your knowledge and opinions. I'm top posting
    instead of replying paragraph by paragraph, though, because I
    sense the cart getting before the horse in some sentences while
    he's in the correct place behind the cart in others. Thus, I do
    not know how to respond without picking an argument with you,
    which I want to avoid.

    So, while I do agree with much of what you say, there's enough
    areas of disagreement that I think I'll let it drop. To end on a
    positive note, I still believe that if both customers and IP
    owners took some of your ideas and some of mine and combined them
    (somehow) into a new way of doing business, the field would be
    leveled and everyone would be happy. I just don't know how to
    make that happen.

    Have a great week and let's try a new topic for debate.

    >>How does piracy keep prices down? I know someone, a relative,
    >>who has 100% warez bootleg SW on his PC. That tends to drive
    >>prices up IMO because the developers want a set level of
    >>return on investment - although it may be UNreasonable to the
    >>customer at today's prices - so they will jack up the price to
    >>cover the perceived piracy. Now, if the threat is unfounded,
    >>then your point is probably more valid than mine.

    >
    > I think piracy keeps prices down because (a) copyright is a
    > legal monopoly and (b) lower prices serve to discourage
    > piracy, as I've seen firsthand. For example, if a kid has to
    > shell out $18 for a CD just to get one cut he likes, then he's
    > more likely to forego purchase and just copy it. Make that
    > one cut easily available for purchase at $1, or drop the
    > entire CD price down to $10, and he's more likely to buy it.
    >
    > I think it's a mistake to assume that piracy somehow has any
    > real effect on rate of return on investment -- there's no real
    > evidence I know of that any significant amount of piracy gets
    > turned into increased sales sufficient to offset the increased
    > costs by copy protection. As pirates often say, they just
    > wouldn't be buying it.
    >
    > Why then do copyright holders pursue copy protection? I think
    > it's out of a misplaced desire for control, in the hope of
    > increasing revenue, often by outrageous double-dipping. Why
    > should a consumer that's bought a CD have to pay again to have
    > a ring tone of one of the cuts? Yet that's just what the
    > music giants want, and piracy has nothing to do with it.
    >
    > Economics teaches that competition drives prices down toward
    > marginal cost, but that doesn't apply to copyright since it's
    > a legal monopoly, and there often aren't real substitutes.
    >
    >>> Again, I doubt it. As an active beta tester I know for a
    >>> fact that many companies deliberately ship products with
    >>> known bugs, some of which are quite serious.

    >>
    >>You and I go way back, John, as you illustrated above. And, I
    >>know from personal experience with software for many years,
    >>including the early copy protection on the Apple, that it
    >>makes the programmers job much more difficult and adds
    >>code/complexity which makes alpha and beta testing more of a
    >>challenge. It CAN be done, as you comment on, but what then
    >>explains the rising bugs as more and more activation and other
    >>crap goes on, in addition to more glitz and shorter debug
    >>time? The less crap code not related to the purpose of the
    >>product means less bloat, faster execution, faster installs,
    >>and in my experience (admittedly older than yours) more
    >>chance for side-effect bugs to slip by.

    >
    > My own take is that copy protection is only a minor factor in
    > this mess, that the major factors are massive code bloat,
    > excessive complexity, feature creep, poor quality management,
    > and more concern with getting it out the door than with
    > getting it out the door right.
    >
    > One case in point is Adobe Photoshop Elements 6, where Adobe
    > has actually said it delayed writing all the help and
    > documentation until after the code was written so that
    > implementation could keep changing until the last minute.
    > Yikes! My take as a software quality professional is that's
    > absolutely the wrong way to go about it, effectively
    > backwards. The right way is to design the app properly, with
    > built-in quality, document it, and only then write the code,
    > which takes much less time and comes out with much better
    > quality.
    >
    > Older experience than me? My first code was written in 1960.
    > ;) You?
    >
    >>> I see no evidence that copyright holders would be more
    >>> reasonable in their behavior. If anything, just the
    >>> opposite.

    >>
    >>Well, as things stand now, you're right. But, just like the
    >>Israelis and Palistinians, at some point, you HAVE to
    >>negotiate. Doesn't mean there's a peace treaty at the first
    >>Camp David meeting or even after 10-20 years, but for both the
    >>IP owners and the customers, a new paradigm is needed. As I
    >>mentioned above, each "side" has to be willing to give a
    >>little to get a little until the escalation in prices and
    >>piracy becomes de-escalation.

    >
    > I don't see this as customers having to give a little --
    > they've lost too much already. I think what's needed is a
    > return to a level playing field -- the balance has tilted way
    > too much toward copyright holders, which I think has actually
    > exacerbated the problem.
    >
    >>I doubt that's easy and may not happen in my lifetime, but I
    >>feel that we'll never know if the SW and music/movie industry
    >>doesn't use some sort of focus groups, panels, town halls,
    >>something to get more in tune and in touch with their
    >>customers and be less arogant.

    >
    > I agree.
    >
    >>And, customers have to show their honesty more than I
    >>perceive they are.

    >
    > I think customers are basically honest, but perceive they are
    > being screwed, so bend the rules more than they normally
    > would.
    >
    >>So, while you may disagree with me, I do not disagree that
    >>much with you. I think you have many valid points and we
    >>should combine our ideas somehow.

    >
    > Agreed.
    >
    >>Have a great day!

    >
    > You too!
    >


    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
     
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 22, 2008
    #11
  12. Guest

    Darn, I just ordered 2 DVD's from veevideo before i found this thread
    while searching, i guess you guys are saying i won't be getting
    original DVD's. If they turn out to be fake, I'll be returning them
    and asking my CC company to do a chargeback.
     
    , Mar 16, 2008
    #12
  13. Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 09:57:26 -0700, l.johnstone wrote:

    > Darn, I just ordered 2 DVD's from veevideo before i found this thread
    > while searching, i guess you guys are saying i won't be getting original
    > DVD's. If they turn out to be fake, I'll be returning them and asking my
    > CC company to do a chargeback.


    If they are fake you should take them to your local trading standards
    office for their inspection.

    Still claim your money back quoting whatever your trading standards
    officer said. You could also inform your local constabulary.

    --
    Neil
    reverse ra and delete l
    Linux user 335851
     
    Neil Ellwood, Mar 17, 2008
    #13
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