LCD Monitor/TV for picture review

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Robert Strom, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. Robert Strom

    Robert Strom Guest

    Looking for a high image quality LCD Monitor/TV to take on
    location/studio so I can review my images on a screen larger than the
    LCD monitor built into the camera.

    I have taken my camera and hookes the video out cable into many LCD
    TV's in the major electronics stores, and they all badly pixelize the
    images.

    Best quality I have seen is using my Sony 15" CRT broadcast monitor I
    use to edit video with. This monitor weighs about 20 lbs, but the
    quality is as good as could be expected from a television monitor.

    I have also tried using the Benq FP791 17" LCD monitor with a built in
    CF card reader. Quality of images is great, however 2 drawbacks
    1. I must remove the CF card from my camera and put it into the
    monitor to review the image (means I cannot review each image as it is
    shot)
    2. The monitor produces a full screen image which stretches the image
    on my native 3040x2016 pixel images

    With all the digital cameras being sold has no-one come up with a high
    quality, 15" to 17" monitor I can tether to my camera's composite
    video out cable and review my pictures (show my clients) "on the
    fly"?

    Does anyone have any experience using some of the new professional
    broadcast quality LCD TV monitors by sony or Panasonic?

    Does someone make a decent conversion box from composite video to XVGA
    so I could use an off the shelf LCD computer monitor?

    Some manufacturer is missing a tremendous profit potential for digital
    photographers to be able to see their pictures in the field on a
    monitor larger than the 2" LCD monitors built into the camera.

    Bert Storm
     
    Robert Strom, Jan 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. Robert Strom

    Steve Guest

    "Robert Strom" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > With all the digital cameras being sold has no-one come up with a high
    > quality, 15" to 17" monitor I can tether to my camera's composite
    > video out cable and review my pictures (show my clients) "on the
    > fly"?
    >
    > Does anyone have any experience using some of the new professional
    > broadcast quality LCD TV monitors by sony or Panasonic?
    >
    > Does someone make a decent conversion box from composite video to XVGA
    > so I could use an off the shelf LCD computer monitor?


    The issue is not your display device, it is the camera.

    It only outputs a very low resolution image, and it is in composite video as
    well which is the worse possible way of displaying an image.

    You don't say which camera you have but have you thought about using your
    camera in tethered mode connected to your PC.

    Every time you shoot, the image is downloaded to the PC via the USB cable
    and can then be previewed in full resolution.

    Regards,

    Steve
     
    Steve, Jan 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Robert Strom

    Robert Strom Guest

    Steve:
    Thanks for you reply
    I agree the video out on my Fuji S1 is not great, but it looks very
    good on my Sony 15" professional refernce monitor. I suppose it has
    to do with higher quality components and comb filters.

    On every LCD TV I have demo'd the image looks blocky. I even went
    out and bought a BenQ 17" LCD monitor with a built in CF card reader.
    Nice concept except you have to pull the card out of the camera every
    time I want to view an image PLUS the monitor stretches the image
    vertically to fill the scree. I took it back.

    I guess I will have to give in and use my laptop to view the images,
    tethered to my camera. One minor problem is the Fuji software is
    clunky. Maybe when I get an S2 or D200 (or whatever is coming out
    new) the software for the PC may be more user friendly.

    Robert

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:31:31 -0000, "Steve"
    <> wrote:

    >"Robert Strom" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >> With all the digital cameras being sold has no-one come up with a high
    >> quality, 15" to 17" monitor I can tether to my camera's composite
    >> video out cable and review my pictures (show my clients) "on the
    >> fly"?
    >>
    >> Does anyone have any experience using some of the new professional
    >> broadcast quality LCD TV monitors by sony or Panasonic?
    >>
    >> Does someone make a decent conversion box from composite video to XVGA
    >> so I could use an off the shelf LCD computer monitor?

    >
    >The issue is not your display device, it is the camera.
    >
    >It only outputs a very low resolution image, and it is in composite video as
    >well which is the worse possible way of displaying an image.
    >
    >You don't say which camera you have but have you thought about using your
    >camera in tethered mode connected to your PC.
    >
    >Every time you shoot, the image is downloaded to the PC via the USB cable
    >and can then be previewed in full resolution.
    >
    >Regards,
    >
    >Steve
    >
     
    Robert Strom, Jan 30, 2004
    #3
  4. Robert Strom

    Jim Davis Guest

    Re: Re: LCD Monitor/TV for picture review

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:31:31 -0000, "Steve"
    <> wrote/replied to:

    >
    >The issue is not your display device, it is the camera.
    >
    >It only outputs a very low resolution image, and it is in composite video as
    >well which is the worse possible way of displaying an image.


    I don't know, I plugged my video cord from my 10D into a hotel TV set
    and was very pleased at the quality of the display.

    Having a calibrated monitor would perhaps make it look better, but
    it's never going to really show the image qualities. Better to shoot
    and do a clip if the customer wants to examine the final product,
    output to a proof printer instantly and show the customer that. Would
    only take a few minutes. No photographer wants a customer leaning over
    his shoulder watching on the monitor and making judgements.

    If it's only perhaps for placement or small stuff, the TV I assure you
    is more than sufficient.
     
    Jim Davis, Feb 10, 2004
    #4
  5. Robert Strom

    Jim Davis Guest

    Re: Re: LCD Monitor/TV for picture review

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 13:24:33 GMT, Robert Strom
    <> wrote/replied to:

    >I guess I will have to give in and use my laptop to view the images,
    >tethered to my camera. One minor problem is the Fuji software is
    >clunky. Maybe when I get an S2 or D200 (or whatever is coming out
    >new) the software for the PC may be more user friendly.


    Didn't Nikon's newest camera have wireless ability? surely this would
    satisfy your needs.

    D2H I think it is.
     
    Jim Davis, Feb 10, 2004
    #5
  6. Robert Strom

    Steve Guest

    Re: Re: LCD Monitor/TV for picture review

    In article:<>,
    Jim Davis <> typed:
    > On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:31:31 -0000, "Steve"
    > <> wrote/replied to:
    >
    >>
    >> The issue is not your display device, it is the camera.
    >>
    >> It only outputs a very low resolution image, and it is in composite
    >> video as well which is the worse possible way of displaying an image.

    >
    > I don't know, I plugged my video cord from my 10D into a hotel TV set
    > and was very pleased at the quality of the display.
    >
    > Having a calibrated monitor would perhaps make it look better, but
    > it's never going to really show the image qualities. Better to shoot
    > and do a clip if the customer wants to examine the final product,
    > output to a proof printer instantly and show the customer that. Would
    > only take a few minutes. No photographer wants a customer leaning over
    > his shoulder watching on the monitor and making judgements.
    >
    > If it's only perhaps for placement or small stuff, the TV I assure you
    > is more than sufficient.


    Hi

    I don't dispute anything you said. I frequently connect my 300D to my TV and
    get perfectly acceptable results.

    The problem was that the original poster was attempting to connect to a high
    resolution LCD display - which will really show up the deficiencies in a
    320x240 interlaced composite video signal!

    Regards,

    Steve
     
    Steve, Feb 10, 2004
    #6
  7. Robert Strom

    Robert Strom Guest

    I was the original poster. The light bulb went off when you said the
    output is 320x240. I had never heard of, or considered this a
    possibility, but it makes sense.

    How could digital camera manufacturers (especially on the high end
    cameras) not see the obvious practicality of reviewing the photos in
    the best resolution possible on a large TV/monitor?

    For me this is one of the best advantages of shooting digitally. My
    clients love the "Poloroid" moment because they get to see where there
    money is going as I shoot. It is awkward to have to give them a slide
    viewing loupe and show them how to use it to enlarge the tiny LCD
    monitor on the camera, but it is still the only way I have found to
    see the best representation of what the camera captured!

    Squinting at pixels, Robert Storm

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 13:01:05 -0000, "Steve"
    <> wrote:

    >In article:<>,
    >Jim Davis <> typed:
    >> On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:31:31 -0000, "Steve"
    >> <> wrote/replied to:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> The issue is not your display device, it is the camera.
    >>>
    >>> It only outputs a very low resolution image, and it is in composite
    >>> video as well which is the worse possible way of displaying an image.

    >>
    >> I don't know, I plugged my video cord from my 10D into a hotel TV set
    >> and was very pleased at the quality of the display.
    >>
    >> Having a calibrated monitor would perhaps make it look better, but
    >> it's never going to really show the image qualities. Better to shoot
    >> and do a clip if the customer wants to examine the final product,
    >> output to a proof printer instantly and show the customer that. Would
    >> only take a few minutes. No photographer wants a customer leaning over
    >> his shoulder watching on the monitor and making judgements.
    >>
    >> If it's only perhaps for placement or small stuff, the TV I assure you
    >> is more than sufficient.

    >
    >Hi
    >
    >I don't dispute anything you said. I frequently connect my 300D to my TV and
    >get perfectly acceptable results.
    >
    >The problem was that the original poster was attempting to connect to a high
    >resolution LCD display - which will really show up the deficiencies in a
    >320x240 interlaced composite video signal!
    >
    >Regards,
    >
    >Steve
    >
     
    Robert Strom, Feb 10, 2004
    #7
  8. Robert Strom

    Adam Drew Guest

    Robert Strom wrote:

    > I was the original poster. The light bulb went off when you said the
    > output is 320x240. I had never heard of, or considered this a
    > possibility, but it makes sense.
    >
    > How could digital camera manufacturers (especially on the high end
    > cameras) not see the obvious practicality of reviewing the photos in
    > the best resolution possible on a large TV/monitor?
    >
    > For me this is one of the best advantages of shooting digitally. My
    > clients love the "Poloroid" moment because they get to see where there
    > money is going as I shoot. It is awkward to have to give them a slide
    > viewing loupe and show them how to use it to enlarge the tiny LCD
    > monitor on the camera, but it is still the only way I have found to
    > see the best representation of what the camera captured!
    >
    > Squinting at pixels, Robert Storm
    >
    > On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 13:01:05 -0000, "Steve"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article:<>,
    >>Jim Davis <> typed:
    >>
    >>>On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:31:31 -0000, "Steve"
    >>><> wrote/replied to:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>The issue is not your display device, it is the camera.
    >>>>
    >>>>It only outputs a very low resolution image, and it is in composite
    >>>>video as well which is the worse possible way of displaying an image.
    >>>
    >>>I don't know, I plugged my video cord from my 10D into a hotel TV set
    >>>and was very pleased at the quality of the display.
    >>>
    >>>Having a calibrated monitor would perhaps make it look better, but
    >>>it's never going to really show the image qualities. Better to shoot
    >>>and do a clip if the customer wants to examine the final product,
    >>>output to a proof printer instantly and show the customer that. Would
    >>>only take a few minutes. No photographer wants a customer leaning over
    >>>his shoulder watching on the monitor and making judgements.
    >>>
    >>>If it's only perhaps for placement or small stuff, the TV I assure you
    >>>is more than sufficient.

    >>
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>I don't dispute anything you said. I frequently connect my 300D to my TV and
    >>get perfectly acceptable results.
    >>
    >>The problem was that the original poster was attempting to connect to a high
    >>resolution LCD display - which will really show up the deficiencies in a
    >>320x240 interlaced composite video signal!
    >>
    >>Regards,
    >>
    >>Steve
    >>

    >
    >

    I use Toast and burn the images to a DVD slideshow. My DVD player is
    connected to my (not Hi-Def) TV via component video and the images look
    fantastic--none of the jittering and whatnot that I get when I connect
    the camera directly to the tv via composite video.

    IIRC the resolution is something like 640x480 or 720x480.

    HTH,
    Adam
     
    Adam Drew, Feb 10, 2004
    #8
  9. Robert Strom

    Jim Davis Guest

    Re: Re: Re: LCD Monitor/TV for picture review

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 13:01:05 -0000, "Steve"
    <> wrote/replied to:

    >
    >I don't dispute anything you said. I frequently connect my 300D to my TV and
    >get perfectly acceptable results.
    >
    >The problem was that the original poster was attempting to connect to a high
    >resolution LCD display - which will really show up the deficiencies in a
    >320x240 interlaced composite video signal!


    Yes, but he was really wanting to have a monitor for the client to see
    immediately after shooting. I pointed out that no matter now good the
    monitor, it's not really good enough to do colour picking or dynamic
    range decisions on. If he wants the client to do cropping and other
    simple stuff, a good TV would be fine.

    I just don't think the extra expense would really pay off. Much better
    to invest in a good Epson proof printer and output to that. The client
    can then see almost exactly what he'll end up with, and it's likely
    cheaper in the long run, since a proofer is much handier than just for
    showing clients on the fly.
     
    Jim Davis, Feb 17, 2004
    #9
  10. Robert Strom

    Jim Davis Guest

    Re: Re: LCD Monitor/TV for picture review

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 16:57:03 GMT, Robert Strom
    <> wrote/replied to:

    >For me this is one of the best advantages of shooting digitally. My
    >clients love the "Poloroid" moment because they get to see where there
    >money is going as I shoot. It is awkward to have to give them a slide
    >viewing loupe and show them how to use it to enlarge the tiny LCD
    >monitor on the camera, but it is still the only way I have found to
    >see the best representation of what the camera captured!


    But this is such a poor representation. Even if you could output to a
    computer monitor, it's poor. Much better like i said to output to
    something like an Epson 5000 proofer.
     
    Jim Davis, Feb 17, 2004
    #10
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