LCD monitor advice.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by grumpyoldhori, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. My good wife is looking at buying one of these
    19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.

    She in the main wants it to view videos off
    UKnova,Google video etc.

    Could I have some advice on which of these
    would be most suitable.
    Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
    the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
    Thanks in advance

    http://www.tastech.co.nz/monitors.htm
    --
    grumpy
     
    grumpyoldhori, Mar 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. grumpyoldhori

    Mathew Good Guest

    On Wed, 28 Mar 2007 14:40:51 +1200, grumpyoldhori <> wrote:

    >
    > My good wife is looking at buying one of these
    > 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
    >
    > She in the main wants it to view videos off
    > UKnova,Google video etc.
    >
    > Could I have some advice on which of these
    > would be most suitable.
    > Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
    > the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > http://www.tastech.co.nz/monitors.htm




    There are normal Very Basic low end LCD Monitors with low Resolutions..

    Also I doubt think your computer has a Digital Output so the Pictures will, not be that crisp..
     
    Mathew Good, Mar 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. grumpyoldhori

    Shane Guest

    Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know how to
    stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is still going.

    If you can become the root user of your computer do the following
    $ su
    Password:
    # ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org

    If you can use the sudo command instead
    $ sudo ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org

    There are two options for negating the need to change your clock every time
    daylight savings starts or finishes.
    Option 1)
    tzconfig (aka Timezone configuration)

    Option 2)
    Instruct your machine to check with time servers what the correct time is,
    normally done at boot.
    As I recall you use Suse I *think* (without looking it up) the name of the
    file is /etc/boot.local
    In Debian/Ubuntu/RH its called rc.local

    er.. I looked it up and Suse uses /etc/init.d/boot.local

    In any case add the ntpdate command to that file using your favourite text
    editor eg.

    $ sudo kate /etc/init.d/boot.local

    add the line
    ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org

    save and exit.

    Alternatively log out of your computer, and login as root (therefore
    your 'X' will be roots 'X') and from a command prompt run
    # kate /etc/init.d/boot.local

    or
    Hit the 'K' scroll up the menu to 'Utilities' and on that menu start 'Kate'
    From there browse to /etc/init.d and open boot.local


    *All* of the above assumes you have ntpdate installed, and a permanent
    connection (ie. broadband) to the intarweb.
    Your package manager (Yast?) is the first port of call if the former
    HTH
     
    Shane, Mar 28, 2007
    #3
  4. grumpyoldhori

    Chris Hope Guest

    Shane wrote:

    > Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know
    > how to stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is
    > still going.
    >
    > If you can become the root user of your computer do the following
    > $ su
    > Password:
    > # ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
    >
    > If you can use the sudo command instead
    > $ sudo ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
    >
    > There are two options for negating the need to change your clock every
    > time daylight savings starts or finishes.
    > Option 1)
    > tzconfig (aka Timezone configuration)
    >
    > Option 2)
    > Instruct your machine to check with time servers what the correct time
    > is, normally done at boot.
    > As I recall you use Suse I *think* (without looking it up) the name of
    > the file is /etc/boot.local
    > In Debian/Ubuntu/RH its called rc.local
    >
    > er.. I looked it up and Suse uses /etc/init.d/boot.local
    >
    > In any case add the ntpdate command to that file using your favourite
    > text editor eg.
    >
    > $ sudo kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
    >
    > add the line
    > ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
    >
    > save and exit.
    >
    > Alternatively log out of your computer, and login as root (therefore
    > your 'X' will be roots 'X') and from a command prompt run
    > # kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
    >
    > or
    > Hit the 'K' scroll up the menu to 'Utilities' and on that menu start
    > 'Kate' From there browse to /etc/init.d and open boot.local
    >
    >
    > *All* of the above assumes you have ntpdate installed, and a permanent
    > connection (ie. broadband) to the intarweb.
    > Your package manager (Yast?) is the first port of call if the former
    > HTH


    You can set the NTP configuration using Yast, ie you don't need to do
    any of the command line stuff / edit text files. Fire up Yast, then
    select "Network Services" and then "NTP Configuration".

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
     
    Chris Hope, Mar 28, 2007
    #4
  5. grumpyoldhori

    Chris Hope Guest

    Chris Hope wrote:

    > Shane wrote:
    >
    >> Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know
    >> how to stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is
    >> still going.
    >>
    >> If you can become the root user of your computer do the following
    >> $ su
    >> Password:
    >> # ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
    >>
    >> If you can use the sudo command instead
    >> $ sudo ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
    >>
    >> There are two options for negating the need to change your clock
    >> every time daylight savings starts or finishes.
    >> Option 1)
    >> tzconfig (aka Timezone configuration)
    >>
    >> Option 2)
    >> Instruct your machine to check with time servers what the correct
    >> time is, normally done at boot.
    >> As I recall you use Suse I *think* (without looking it up) the name
    >> of the file is /etc/boot.local
    >> In Debian/Ubuntu/RH its called rc.local
    >>
    >> er.. I looked it up and Suse uses /etc/init.d/boot.local
    >>
    >> In any case add the ntpdate command to that file using your favourite
    >> text editor eg.
    >>
    >> $ sudo kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
    >>
    >> add the line
    >> ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
    >>
    >> save and exit.
    >>
    >> Alternatively log out of your computer, and login as root (therefore
    >> your 'X' will be roots 'X') and from a command prompt run
    >> # kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
    >>
    >> or
    >> Hit the 'K' scroll up the menu to 'Utilities' and on that menu start
    >> 'Kate' From there browse to /etc/init.d and open boot.local
    >>
    >>
    >> *All* of the above assumes you have ntpdate installed, and a
    >> permanent connection (ie. broadband) to the intarweb.
    >> Your package manager (Yast?) is the first port of call if the former
    >> HTH

    >
    > You can set the NTP configuration using Yast, ie you don't need to do
    > any of the command line stuff / edit text files. Fire up Yast, then
    > select "Network Services" and then "NTP Configuration".


    Assuming you're using SUSE, of course :)

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
     
    Chris Hope, Mar 28, 2007
    #5
  6. grumpyoldhori

    Shane Guest

    Chris Hope wrote:

    > Chris Hope wrote:


    >> You can set the NTP configuration using Yast, ie you don't need to do
    >> any of the command line stuff / edit text files. Fire up Yast, then
    >> select "Network Services" and then "NTP Configuration".

    >
    > Assuming you're using SUSE, of course :)
    >


    Bah.. far too easy.. how will *that* grow hairs on his chest???
    :)
     
    Shane, Mar 28, 2007
    #6
  7. Shane wrote:

    > Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know how to
    > stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is still going.
    >


    Thanks Shane,worked like a charm with kate,vi is
    just too much hard work for we in our late,late
    thirties.
    --
    grumpy
     
    grumpyoldhori, Mar 28, 2007
    #7
  8. Chris Hope wrote:

    > Assuming you're using SUSE, of course :)
    >

    Still using suse 10,gave up the battle to get the
    wireless card going on 10.2
    --
    grumpy
     
    grumpyoldhori, Mar 28, 2007
    #8
  9. grumpyoldhori

    XPD Guest

    "grumpyoldhori" <> wrote in message
    news:eucg4h$tpd$...
    >
    > My good wife is looking at buying one of these
    > 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
    >
    > She in the main wants it to view videos off
    > UKnova,Google video etc.
    >
    > Could I have some advice on which of these
    > would be most suitable.
    > Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
    > the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
    > Thanks in advance


    CMV are fine for the price, used to sell quite a few and probably 2% ever
    came back with issues (which were promptly resolved).
    Viewsonics are nice monitors as well.....

    TBH most LCDs these days are good for joe average. For daily use, there is
    no real difference between analog and DVI.
     
    XPD, Mar 28, 2007
    #9
  10. grumpyoldhori

    Chris Hope Guest

    grumpyoldhori wrote:

    > Chris Hope wrote:
    >
    >> Assuming you're using SUSE, of course :)
    >>

    > Still using suse 10,gave up the battle to get the
    > wireless card going on 10.2


    Yeah it's funny how some hardware that worked beautifully on older
    versions of a particular distro stops working in later versions. I had
    a customer with Fedora Core 5 and it worked fine but it wasn't possible
    to install FC6. He had a dual processor motherboard but with only one
    processor and for some reason FC6 refused to install on it, apparantly
    due to this processor configuration.

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
     
    Chris Hope, Mar 28, 2007
    #10
  11. XPD wrote:

    > CMV are fine for the price, used to sell quite a few and probably 2% ever
    > came back with issues (which were promptly resolved).
    > Viewsonics are nice monitors as well.....
    >
    > TBH most LCDs these days are good for joe average. For daily use, there is
    > no real difference between analog and DVI.


    Thanks for that,I may recommend to my good wife that
    she grabs a Viewsonic and a video card.
    --
    grumpy
     
    grumpyoldhori, Mar 28, 2007
    #11
  12. grumpyoldhori

    jasen Guest

    On 2007-03-28, grumpyoldhori <> wrote:
    >
    > My good wife is looking at buying one of these
    > 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
    >
    > She in the main wants it to view videos off
    > UKnova,Google video etc.


    pretty much any monitor will be fine for low definition video like that.


    Bye.
    Jasen
     
    jasen, Mar 28, 2007
    #12
  13. grumpyoldhori

    jasen Guest

    On 2007-03-28, Shane <-a-geek.net> wrote:


    >Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2007 15:21:19 +1200

    ....
    >NNTP-Posting-Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2007 03:19:32 +0000 (UTC)


    > Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know how to
    > stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is still going.
    >


    if so why is your clock 2 set miniutes into the future? :)

    also there's no evidence that his computer thinks it's DST

    >> Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2007 14:40:51 +1200


    +1200 is NZST

    >> NNTP-Posting-Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2007 01:24:34 +0000 (UTC)


    It is however over three hours fast.

    :)

    > # ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org


    yeah, that'll fix it.


    --

    Bye.
    Jasen
     
    jasen, Mar 28, 2007
    #13
  14. jasen wrote:

    > pretty much any monitor will be fine for low definition video like that.
    >
    >
    > Bye.
    > Jasen


    Thanks for that.
    --
    grumpy
     
    grumpyoldhori, Mar 28, 2007
    #14
  15. grumpyoldhori

    Kent Smith Guest

    grumpyoldhori wrote:
    > My good wife is looking at buying one of these
    > 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
    >
    > She in the main wants it to view videos off
    > UKnova,Google video etc.
    >
    > Could I have some advice on which of these
    > would be most suitable.
    > Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
    > the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > http://www.tastech.co.nz/monitors.htm


    Find out what the max resolution capabilities of the video card are. Most
    low end LCD's are 1280x1024 now, if the card only does 1024x768 max, any
    text will look blurry due to scaling. Get a monitor that has the native
    resolution equivalent to a resolution the video card supports.


    -KENT
     
    Kent Smith, Mar 28, 2007
    #15
  16. grumpyoldhori

    Shane Guest

    jasen wrote:

    > On 2007-03-28, Shane <-a-geek.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2007 15:21:19 +1200

    > ...
    >>NNTP-Posting-Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2007 03:19:32 +0000 (UTC)


    > if so why is your clock 2 set miniutes into the future? :)


    erm
    shane@shane-laptop:~$ sudo ntpdate pool.ntp.org
    Password:
    29 Mar 06:46:11 ntpdate[5030]: adjust time server 149.156.70.5
    offset -0.043029 sec
     
    Shane, Mar 28, 2007
    #16
  17. grumpyoldhori

    Fierce Guppy Guest

    XPD wrote:
    > "grumpyoldhori" <> wrote in message
    > news:eucg4h$tpd$...
    >> My good wife is looking at buying one of these
    >> 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
    >>
    >> She in the main wants it to view videos off
    >> UKnova,Google video etc.
    >>
    >> Could I have some advice on which of these
    >> would be most suitable.
    >> Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
    >> the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
    >> Thanks in advance

    >
    > CMV are fine for the price, used to sell quite a few and probably 2% ever
    > came back with issues (which were promptly resolved).
    > Viewsonics are nice monitors as well.....
    >
    > TBH most LCDs these days are good for joe average. For daily use, there is
    > no real difference between analog and DVI.


    The graphics card makes a big difference is this area. Joe Average could
    be inflicted with cataracts and still notice the stark difference in
    quality between DVI and VGA output on my card.

    Fierce Guppy

    (fierce,guppy@paradise,net,nz)
     
    Fierce Guppy, Mar 30, 2007
    #17
  18. In article <460ccdf5$>, says...
    >
    > The graphics card makes a big difference is this area. Joe Average could
    > be inflicted with cataracts and still notice the stark difference in
    > quality between DVI and VGA output on my card.
    >
    > Fierce Guppy
    >


    Interesting. I can't see any difference at all on mine. (GeCube Radeon 9600 XT,
    HP 1955 monitor @1280x1024x32) - I was quite disappointed in a way when I
    discovered that last year <grin>. I mean that in a good way -- it's excellent
    never mind which cable I use.

    -P.

    --
    =========================================
    firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
     
    Peter Huebner, Mar 30, 2007
    #18
  19. grumpyoldhori

    Kent Smith Guest

    Peter Huebner wrote:
    > In article <460ccdf5$>, says...
    >>
    >> The graphics card makes a big difference is this area. Joe Average
    >> could be inflicted with cataracts and still notice the stark
    >> difference in quality between DVI and VGA output on my card.
    >>
    >> Fierce Guppy

    >
    > Interesting. I can't see any difference at all on mine. (GeCube
    > Radeon 9600 XT, HP 1955 monitor @1280x1024x32) - I was quite
    > disappointed in a way when I discovered that last year <grin>. I mean
    > that in a good way -- it's excellent never mind which cable I use.
    >
    > -P.


    The first thing I normally notice on most LCD's using VGA cable is; When
    viewing white text on a dark coloured background (eg the icon labels on a XP
    desktop), it has a ghosting type edge effect - It is not present on DVI.


    -KENT
     
    Kent Smith, Mar 30, 2007
    #19
  20. grumpyoldhori

    jasen Guest

    On 2007-03-30, Kent Smith <> wrote:

    > The first thing I normally notice on most LCD's using VGA cable is; When
    > viewing white text on a dark coloured background (eg the icon labels on a XP
    > desktop), it has a ghosting type edge effect - It is not present on DVI.


    It could just be that your VGA cable is crap.

    Bye.
    Jasen
     
    jasen, Mar 30, 2007
    #20
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