LCD Flat Screens: What to look for? Advice Needed.

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by David Mills, Oct 28, 2003.

  1. David Mills

    David Mills Guest

    I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    stay away from / What should I go for?

    I've notice that there are some stats such as:
    -Viewable Size
    -Resolution
    -Constrast Ratio
    -Rerfresh Rate

    One of the reasons I am looking at getting one is because I think it
    will help my eyes which get really, really tired when looking at
    standard monitors.

    Any input or help would be great.
    Thanks for your time.
     
    David Mills, Oct 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. David Mills

    Peter Kemp Guest

    In article <>, David
    Mills <> wrote:

    > I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    > stay away from / What should I go for?



    Try looking at:

    http://www.pcpro.co.uk/

    and follow the 'LABS' link - they recently reviewed 17 and 18 inch
    TFTs. If you can get hold of the paper magazine, so much the better -
    but the online reviews should give you some ideas.......

    Regards
    Peter
     
    Peter Kemp, Oct 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. David Mills

    Thor Guest

    "David Mills" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    > stay away from / What should I go for?
    >
    > I've notice that there are some stats such as:
    > -Viewable Size


    With LCD flat screens, you get the full advertised size, unlike CRTs which
    have an advertised size, and a viewable size that is smaller.

    > -Resolution


    This largely depends on the size of the LCD. Typically 15" LCDs only go up
    to 1024x768. 17" models will go to 1280x1024, etc.

    > -Constrast Ratio


    higher the better. Gives you more contrast between light and dark areas.

    > -Rerfresh Rate


    Usually a non-issue with LCDs. Most run at a nominal 60hz. Refresh doesn't
    work the same way on an LCD, so 60 is fine. On a CRT, 60 wouldn't be
    adequate for comfortable viewing for most folks. But on an LCD it looks
    great.

    Lastly, when you see a "flat screen" advertised, make sure it is really what
    you think it is. I see CRT monitors advertised as "flat screens" all the
    time, and lots of people mistake them for "flat panel" LCDs which are the
    really thin ones. CRT "flat screens" merely refer to the fact that their
    tube face is vertically and/or horizontally flat. It still has the long tube
    neck that necessitates the large cabinet size, which takes up lots of desk
    space. Flat *panel* LCD screens are the popular super thin space-efficient
    monitors.


    ...
     
    Thor, Oct 28, 2003
    #3
  4. David Mills

    David C. Guest

    (David Mills) writes:
    >
    > I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    > stay away from / What should I go for?
    >
    > I've notice that there are some stats such as:
    > -Viewable Size


    This is the physical size of the display. It will be in units of
    diagonal inches. Note that some LCD monitors are wide-screen aspect
    ratios. A 17" widescreen display may be the same height as a 1.33:1
    aspect 15" display.

    > -Resolution


    The number of pixels supported in each dimension. LCD displays only
    look good when running at one resolution, sometimes known as the
    "native" resolution.

    If you run an LCD monitor at a resolution other than the native
    resolution, the picture will look fuzzy or distorted. There isn't
    anything you can do about this - it's the nature of the hardware.

    If you want to run at more than one resolution, use a CRT display and
    forget LCDs.

    > -Constrast Ratio


    The diffeence in brightness between the darkest pixels and the
    brightest pixels. In general, higher is better. But this is
    subjective. I recommend you shop at a store that will let you try
    out various displays. What you find pleasing may not be somthing a
    spec sheet can reveal.

    > -Rerfresh Rate


    For an LCD, this shouldn't matter much.

    -- David
     
    David C., Oct 29, 2003
    #4
  5. David Mills

    Guest

    On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 06:20:11 GMT, (David C.) wrote:

    > (David Mills) writes:


    >> Refresh Rate


    >For an LCD, this shouldn't matter much.


    I would add that, while refresh rate is not an issue in the purchasing
    decision, it is important to refresh at the specification rate. If one
    accidentally forgets to lower the refresh rate when switching from a
    CRT to an LCD, the LCD can become annoyed.

    Roy - Carpe Noctem
     
    , Oct 29, 2003
    #5
  6. David Mills

    Martin Guest

    "David Mills" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    > stay away from / What should I go for?
    >
    > I've notice that there are some stats such as:
    > -Viewable Size
    > -Resolution
    > -Constrast Ratio
    > -Rerfresh Rate


    You may want to add Response Time to that list if you like to play action
    games. Look for 16ms or less Total Response Time to avoid blurring when (if)
    you play.

    Martin



    >
    > One of the reasons I am looking at getting one is because I think it
    > will help my eyes which get really, really tired when looking at
    > standard monitors.
    >
    > Any input or help would be great.
    > Thanks for your time.
    >
     
    Martin, Oct 30, 2003
    #6
  7. David Mills

    Mike Guest

    On 30/10/03 1:57 pm, in article uO8ob.2517$9.net,
    "Martin" <> wrote:

    >
    > "David Mills" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    >> stay away from / What should I go for?
    >>
    >> I've notice that there are some stats such as:
    >> -Viewable Size
    >> -Resolution
    >> -Constrast Ratio
    >> -Rerfresh Rate

    >
    > You may want to add Response Time to that list if you like to play action
    > games. Look for 16ms or less Total Response Time to avoid blurring when (if)
    > you play.
    >
    > Martin
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >> One of the reasons I am looking at getting one is because I think it
    >> will help my eyes which get really, really tired when looking at
    >> standard monitors.
    >>
    >> Any input or help would be great.
    >> Thanks for your time.
    >>

    >
    >

    I've bought a couple now, and you have to be very wary of salesman talk. I
    wouldn't buy one without first seeing it in action, and I immediately close
    the full screen pretty picture the salseman put on as it is carefully chosen
    to have soft edges.

    The best test I've found so far is to load a simple text file and watch the
    screen as you scroll vertically. Can't describe except as the cheaper ones
    quickly get blurred - summat you've got to do to many displays to appreciate
    the differences.
     
    Mike, Oct 30, 2003
    #7
  8. David Mills

    kony Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 19:44:06 +0000, Mike
    <> wrote:

    >On 30/10/03 1:57 pm, in article uO8ob.2517$9.net,
    >"Martin" <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "David Mills" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> I am looking at buying a flat screen for my computer. What should I
    >>> stay away from / What should I go for?
    >>>
    >>> I've notice that there are some stats such as:
    >>> -Viewable Size
    >>> -Resolution
    >>> -Constrast Ratio
    >>> -Rerfresh Rate

    >>
    >> You may want to add Response Time to that list if you like to play action
    >> games. Look for 16ms or less Total Response Time to avoid blurring when (if)
    >> you play.
    >>
    >> Martin
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> One of the reasons I am looking at getting one is because I think it
    >>> will help my eyes which get really, really tired when looking at
    >>> standard monitors.
    >>>
    >>> Any input or help would be great.
    >>> Thanks for your time.
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >I've bought a couple now, and you have to be very wary of salesman talk. I
    >wouldn't buy one without first seeing it in action, and I immediately close
    >the full screen pretty picture the salseman put on as it is carefully chosen
    >to have soft edges.
    >
    >The best test I've found so far is to load a simple text file and watch the
    >screen as you scroll vertically. Can't describe except as the cheaper ones
    >quickly get blurred - summat you've got to do to many displays to appreciate
    >the differences.


    If you have a very accomodating saleperson you might even ask to see
    the speific item you're purchasing, to check for dead pixels... not
    that there won't be any, but some are more distracting than others.


    Dave
     
    kony, Oct 30, 2003
    #8
  9. David Mills

    JIM Guest

    "David C." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    .....<cut>....
    >> -Resolution

    >
    > The number of pixels supported in each dimension. LCD displays only
    > look good when running at one resolution, sometimes known as the
    > "native" resolution.
    >
    > If you run an LCD monitor at a resolution other than the native
    > resolution, the picture will look fuzzy or distorted. There isn't
    > anything you can do about this - it's the nature of the hardware.
    >
    > If you want to run at more than one resolution, use a CRT display and
    > forget LCDs.
    >
    > > -Constrast Ratio

    >
    > The diffeence in brightness between the darkest pixels and the
    > brightest pixels. In general, higher is better. But this is
    > subjective. I recommend you shop at a store that will let you try
    > out various displays. What you find pleasing may not be somthing a
    > spec sheet can reveal.
    >
    > > -Rerfresh Rate

    >
    > For an LCD, this shouldn't matter much.


    These flat boys really look interesting and I would like to consider one. I
    primarily use my rig to manipulate photos, etc., and am wondering if there
    are any LCD type displays out there acceptable for photo processing; i.e.,
    any more difficult to calibrate the thing so your print will come out the
    way it looks on the monitor?

    Jim
     
    JIM, Oct 31, 2003
    #9
  10. David Mills

    andrewunix Guest

    Fri, 31 Oct 2003 07:08:21 GMT, suggested:
    : "David C." <> wrote in message
    : news:...
    : ....<cut>....
    :>> -Resolution
    :>
    :> The number of pixels supported in each dimension. LCD displays only
    :> look good when running at one resolution, sometimes known as the
    :> "native" resolution.
    :>
    :> If you run an LCD monitor at a resolution other than the native
    :> resolution, the picture will look fuzzy or distorted. There isn't
    :> anything you can do about this - it's the nature of the hardware.
    :>
    :> If you want to run at more than one resolution, use a CRT display and
    :> forget LCDs.
    :>
    :> > -Constrast Ratio
    :>
    :> The diffeence in brightness between the darkest pixels and the
    :> brightest pixels. In general, higher is better. But this is
    :> subjective. I recommend you shop at a store that will let you try
    :> out various displays. What you find pleasing may not be somthing a
    :> spec sheet can reveal.
    :>
    :> > -Rerfresh Rate
    :>
    :> For an LCD, this shouldn't matter much.
    :
    : These flat boys really look interesting and I would like to consider one. I
    : primarily use my rig to manipulate photos, etc., and am wondering if there
    : are any LCD type displays out there acceptable for photo processing; i.e.,
    : any more difficult to calibrate the thing so your print will come out the
    : way it looks on the monitor?

    The problem with color accuracy on LCDs is that the colors you see will
    change with viewing angle.

    --
    agreenbu @ nyx . net andrew michael greenburg
     
    andrewunix, Oct 31, 2003
    #10
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