Lay Off The Linux-Netbook Returns Issue

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 14, 2009.

  1. It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 14, 2009
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    impossible Guest

    Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    news:h62etj$4jd$...
    > It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.


    When sales of Linux netbooks have plumetted from 25% of the market to less
    than 5%, I suppose returns of Linux netbooks would also decline.

    http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/chrome-linux/

    Still, the Dell marketing manager can't escape the fact that a lot of people
    are attracted , not to Linux, but to to the lower price of machnes with
    Linux installed. Users think they're getting a bargain ersion of Windows,
    only to discover they've simply gotten a cheap and nasty knock-off of
    Windows.

    "Where consumers have returned machines, Finch said, it wasn't because of
    technical problems but because they'd bought a low-priced machine expecting
    Windows and opened it to find a different interface....Issues persist,
    particularly in battery life and power consumption, as well as with the
    number of applications available from major ISVs that run on Linux."

    It always comes down to applications. When will the nixheads learn?
    impossible, Aug 14, 2009
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    impossible Guest

    Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    "impossible" <> wrote in message
    news:ip5hm.46$5n1.12@attbi_s21...
    >
    > "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    > news:h62etj$4jd$...
    >> It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.

    >
    > When sales of Linux netbooks have plumetted from 25% of the market to less
    > than 5%, I suppose returns of Linux netbooks would also decline.
    >
    > http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/chrome-linux/
    >
    > Still, the Dell marketing manager can't escape the fact that a lot of
    > people are attracted , not to Linux, but to to the lower price of machnes
    > with Linux installed. Users think they're getting a bargain ersion of
    > Windows, only to discover they've simply gotten a cheap and nasty
    > knock-off of Windows.
    >
    > "Where consumers have returned machines, Finch said, it wasn't because of
    > technical problems but because they'd bought a low-priced machine
    > expecting Windows and opened it to find a different interface....Issues
    > persist, particularly in battery life and power consumption, as well as
    > with the number of applications available from major ISVs that run on
    > Linux."
    >


    Whoops! Forgot the reference.

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/08/12/dell_reality_linux_windows_netbooks/

    > It always comes down to applications. When will the nixheads learn?
    >
    >
    >
    impossible, Aug 14, 2009
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Gordon Guest

    Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    On 2009-08-14, impossible <> wrote:
    > .... as well as with the
    > number of applications available from major ISVs that run on Linux."
    > It always comes down to applications. When will the nixheads learn?
    >

    In part, the other is something that is not familar.

    Yes, I agree applications are starting to rule okay. The so called cross
    platform programmes are breeding fast, thanks to the code being freely
    avaliable.

    Meanwhile think of this competition is good for you, the consumer. If
    firefox had not arrived on the scene MSIE6 would still be ruling, for what
    would be the insentive to change it?

    Blessed is the rebel, for without her there would be no change.
    Gordon, Aug 14, 2009
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    impossible Guest

    Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    "David Goodwin" <> wrote in message
    news:h637u9$i2r$-september.org...
    > impossible wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >> news:h62etj$4jd$...
    >>> It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.

    >>
    >> When sales of Linux netbooks have plumetted from 25% of the market to
    >> less
    >> than 5%, I suppose returns of Linux netbooks would also decline.
    >>
    >> http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/chrome-linux/
    >>
    >> Still, the Dell marketing manager can't escape the fact that a lot of
    >> people are attracted , not to Linux, but to to the lower price of machnes
    >> with Linux installed. Users think they're getting a bargain ersion of
    >> Windows, only to discover they've simply gotten a cheap and nasty
    >> knock-off of Windows.

    >
    > Except that you forget one thing. GNU/Linux is a cheap and nasty knock-off
    > of *UNIX*, not Windows. Except that it's not nasty - the GNU utilities
    > tend
    > to be much nicer to use than what is found in other UNIXes (except of
    > course when the GNU utilities are actually included in the other UNIXes).
    >


    <yawn>

    > Oh, and GNU wasn't originally designed as just a UNIX knock-off (GNU
    > stands
    > for GNUs Not UNIX). UNIX was just a good starting point. Many years
    > (decades?) on they still haven't finished the kernel (Hurd) so everyone
    > uses the Linux kernel (which is a UNIX clone) instead.
    >


    <yawn


    ..> So Linux is not a "cheap and nasty knock-off of Windows"
    >


    From the consumere's perspective, yes it is.

    >> "Where consumers have returned machines, Finch said, it wasn't because of
    >> technical problems but because they'd bought a low-priced machine
    >> expecting Windows and opened it to find a different interface....Issues
    >> persist, particularly in battery life and power consumption, as well as
    >> with the number of applications available from major ISVs that run on
    >> Linux."
    >>
    >> It always comes down to applications. When will the nixheads learn?

    >
    > That would be a good point if these "Netbook" things were designed as just
    > cheap laptops. As the name "netbook" implies, these are designed for
    > *Internet Applications* (Gmail, facebook, the Google Office thing, etc).
    > For this purpose Linux does the job just fine and at a much lower price
    > than Windows.


    And yet many people continue to return these machines after discovering that
    Linux is not Windows. Go figure.

    > People don't complain when their Cellphone can't run Office
    > 2007 do they? Why should it be any different with Netbooks?
    >


    Many a product has died with the marketing gurus behind it asking exactly
    that sort of question. Lesson: The customer is always right.

    > If people want to run Office or play Halo they should buy a real laptop.
    > One
    > with a proper sized keyboard and screen, a faster CPU and lots of RAM.


    I'm thinking that anyone who wants to do anything that doesn't involve
    squinting at an 8-10 inch screen should buy a real laptop. Why the nixhead
    fascination with these under-powered and ultrimately very disappointing
    netbooks?
    impossible, Aug 14, 2009
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    On Aug 14, 1:33 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    > It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.


    Suffice to say that there is nothing that the OEM's would like better
    than to be rid of Microsoft's stranglehold on the desktop software
    market.
    peterwn, Aug 15, 2009
    #6
  7. Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    impossible wrote:

    >
    > "David Goodwin" <> wrote in message
    > news:h637u9$i2r$-september.org...
    >> impossible wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in
    >>> message news:h62etj$4jd$...
    >>>> It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.
    >>>
    >>> When sales of Linux netbooks have plumetted from 25% of the market to
    >>> less
    >>> than 5%, I suppose returns of Linux netbooks would also decline.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/chrome-linux/
    >>>
    >>> Still, the Dell marketing manager can't escape the fact that a lot of
    >>> people are attracted , not to Linux, but to to the lower price of
    >>> machnes with Linux installed. Users think they're getting a bargain
    >>> ersion of Windows, only to discover they've simply gotten a cheap and
    >>> nasty knock-off of Windows.

    >>
    >> Except that you forget one thing. GNU/Linux is a cheap and nasty
    >> knock-off of *UNIX*, not Windows. Except that it's not nasty - the GNU
    >> utilities tend
    >> to be much nicer to use than what is found in other UNIXes (except of
    >> course when the GNU utilities are actually included in the other UNIXes).
    >>

    >
    > <yawn>
    >
    >> Oh, and GNU wasn't originally designed as just a UNIX knock-off (GNU
    >> stands
    >> for GNUs Not UNIX). UNIX was just a good starting point. Many years
    >> (decades?) on they still haven't finished the kernel (Hurd) so everyone
    >> uses the Linux kernel (which is a UNIX clone) instead.
    >>

    >
    > <yawn
    >
    >
    > .> So Linux is not a "cheap and nasty knock-off of Windows"
    >>

    >
    > From the consumere's perspective, yes it is.


    That may well be so. And it is sad that things have been allowed to get to
    this point. The sooner this is corrected the better.

    >>> "Where consumers have returned machines, Finch said, it wasn't because
    >>> of technical problems but because they'd bought a low-priced machine
    >>> expecting Windows and opened it to find a different interface....Issues
    >>> persist, particularly in battery life and power consumption, as well as
    >>> with the number of applications available from major ISVs that run on
    >>> Linux."
    >>>
    >>> It always comes down to applications. When will the nixheads learn?

    >>
    >> That would be a good point if these "Netbook" things were designed as
    >> just cheap laptops. As the name "netbook" implies, these are designed for
    >> *Internet Applications* (Gmail, facebook, the Google Office thing, etc).
    >> For this purpose Linux does the job just fine and at a much lower price
    >> than Windows.

    >
    > And yet many people continue to return these machines after discovering
    > that Linux is not Windows. Go figure.


    I believe the article was about how people were *not* returning them because
    of Linux.

    >> People don't complain when their Cellphone can't run Office
    >> 2007 do they? Why should it be any different with Netbooks?

    >
    > Many a product has died with the marketing gurus behind it asking exactly
    > that sort of question. Lesson: The customer is always right.
    >
    >> If people want to run Office or play Halo they should buy a real laptop.
    >> One
    >> with a proper sized keyboard and screen, a faster CPU and lots of RAM.

    >
    > I'm thinking that anyone who wants to do anything that doesn't involve
    > squinting at an 8-10 inch screen should buy a real laptop. Why the nixhead
    > fascination with these under-powered and ultrimately very disappointing
    > netbooks?


    I quite agree. I tried typing on a friends Eee PC and found the keyboard
    rather uncomfortable to use.

    I do not think these systems are fascinating because of the hardware - they
    are, as you pointed out, by no means remarkable. I suspect some find them
    interesting because they are perhaps a sign that things are changing.
    Microsoft Corporations Operating System monopoly is perhaps not as strong
    as it once was or appeared to be. Others (such as Google) appear to have
    noticed and are trying to take advantage of this.

    The strength of Windows has traditionally been based on the difficulty of
    writing portable software as you have so often pointed out. The problem for
    Microsoft is that writing portable software isn't actually difficult
    anymore. As more developers realise this, Microsofts position becomes
    weaker.
    David Goodwin, Aug 15, 2009
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Malcolm Guest

    Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    On Sat, 15 Aug 2009 14:51:08 +1200
    David Goodwin <> wrote:

    <snip>
    > I quite agree. I tried typing on a friends Eee PC and found the
    > keyboard rather uncomfortable to use.
    >
    > I do not think these systems are fascinating because of the hardware
    > - they are, as you pointed out, by no means remarkable. I suspect
    > some find them interesting because they are perhaps a sign that
    > things are changing. Microsoft Corporations Operating System monopoly
    > is perhaps not as strong as it once was or appeared to be. Others
    > (such as Google) appear to have noticed and are trying to take
    > advantage of this.
    >
    > The strength of Windows has traditionally been based on the
    > difficulty of writing portable software as you have so often pointed
    > out. The problem for Microsoft is that writing portable software
    > isn't actually difficult anymore. As more developers realise this,
    > Microsofts position becomes weaker.

    Hi
    This one isn't too bad @92% for the keyboard :)

    So far with this test release of openSuSE everything hardware wise is
    working fine. Can play video, dvd's etc with the fluendo codec bundle
    and dvd player and have provided a patched module for the kernel to
    enable the Sabrant USB HDTV to run fine.

    The only windows program I use is Garmin Mapsource, but since I have a
    free copy of crossover it works without issues.

    This one has the 280 cpu (HT) and a slightly faster FSB but it rocks
    along and get around 5 and a half hours of battery life with everything
    running.

    --
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° (Linux Counter #276890)
    openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 5 (i586) Kernel 2.6.31-rc5-git3-2-desktop
    up 22:20, 2 users, load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.00
    ASUS eeePC 1000HE ATOM N280 1.66GHz | GPU Mobile 945GM/GMS/GME
    Malcolm, Aug 15, 2009
    #8
  9. whoisthis wrote:

    > In article
    > <>,
    > peterwn <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Aug 14, 1:33 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    >> central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >> > It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >> > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.

    >>
    >> Suffice to say that there is nothing that the OEM's would like better
    >> than to be rid of Microsoft's stranglehold on the desktop software
    >> market.

    >
    > Why ?, its not going to improve their profit margins...
    > Truth is they could walk away any time they like and install linux on
    > 100% of their machines...... but they know they can not do that, it
    > would kill them.


    I suppose selling linux systems gives them more freedom. They can customise
    their Linux systems to a far greater extent (custom GUI for a Netbook for
    example). Linux supports more hardware too - Windows NT hasn't run on a
    MIPS CPU since the 90s and its never run on ARM as far as I know.
    David Goodwin, Aug 15, 2009
    #9
  10. Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    Malcolm wrote:

    > On Sat, 15 Aug 2009 14:51:08 +1200
    > David Goodwin <> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >> I quite agree. I tried typing on a friends Eee PC and found the
    >> keyboard rather uncomfortable to use.
    >>
    >> I do not think these systems are fascinating because of the hardware
    >> - they are, as you pointed out, by no means remarkable. I suspect
    >> some find them interesting because they are perhaps a sign that
    >> things are changing. Microsoft Corporations Operating System monopoly
    >> is perhaps not as strong as it once was or appeared to be. Others
    >> (such as Google) appear to have noticed and are trying to take
    >> advantage of this.
    >>
    >> The strength of Windows has traditionally been based on the
    >> difficulty of writing portable software as you have so often pointed
    >> out. The problem for Microsoft is that writing portable software
    >> isn't actually difficult anymore. As more developers realise this,
    >> Microsofts position becomes weaker.

    > Hi
    > This one isn't too bad @92% for the keyboard :)


    I suppose I am probably a bit of a keyboard snob - my laptop (HP nx6125) has
    full size keys and I have an IBM Model M keyboard on my desktop computer :)

    > So far with this test release of openSuSE everything hardware wise is
    > working fine. Can play video, dvd's etc with the fluendo codec bundle
    > and dvd player and have provided a patched module for the kernel to
    > enable the Sabrant USB HDTV to run fine.
    >
    > The only windows program I use is Garmin Mapsource, but since I have a
    > free copy of crossover it works without issues.
    >
    > This one has the 280 cpu (HT) and a slightly faster FSB but it rocks
    > along and get around 5 and a half hours of battery life with everything
    > running.


    What do you use as a Desktop Environment?

    For such devices I imagine the flexibility of Plasma would come in handy.
    I've heard the KDE people are planning to provide a UI optimised for small
    screens in the next release of KDE4 (v4.4?). Everyone else seems to be
    doing something similar too - Gnome, Intel, Google, etc.
    David Goodwin, Aug 15, 2009
    #10
  11. In message <>, whoisthis wrote:

    > In article
    > <>,
    > peterwn <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Aug 14, 1:33�pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote:
    >>
    >>> It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.

    >>
    >> Suffice to say that there is nothing that the OEM's would like better
    >> than to be rid of Microsoft's stranglehold on the desktop software
    >> market.

    >
    > Why ?, its not going to improve their profit margins...


    Looks like it will. Microsoft is going to demand higher prices for putting
    Windows 7 on netbooks. But the customers are already accustomed to getting
    the machines cheap. So the only way the hardware vendors can recoup some
    profits is to consider ditching Windows altogether.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 15, 2009
    #11
  12. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    impossible Guest

    Re: Lay off the Linux marketing hype

    "David Goodwin" <> wrote in message
    news:h658ar$674$-september.org...
    > impossible wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "David Goodwin" <> wrote in message
    >> news:h637u9$i2r$-september.org...
    >>> impossible wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in
    >>>> message news:h62etj$4jd$...
    >>>>> It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >>>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.
    >>>>
    >>>> When sales of Linux netbooks have plumetted from 25% of the market to
    >>>> less
    >>>> than 5%, I suppose returns of Linux netbooks would also decline.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/07/chrome-linux/
    >>>>
    >>>> Still, the Dell marketing manager can't escape the fact that a lot of
    >>>> people are attracted , not to Linux, but to to the lower price of
    >>>> machnes with Linux installed. Users think they're getting a bargain
    >>>> ersion of Windows, only to discover they've simply gotten a cheap and
    >>>> nasty knock-off of Windows.
    >>>
    >>> Except that you forget one thing. GNU/Linux is a cheap and nasty
    >>> knock-off of *UNIX*, not Windows. Except that it's not nasty - the GNU
    >>> utilities tend
    >>> to be much nicer to use than what is found in other UNIXes (except of
    >>> course when the GNU utilities are actually included in the other
    >>> UNIXes).
    >>>

    >>
    >> <yawn>
    >>
    >>> Oh, and GNU wasn't originally designed as just a UNIX knock-off (GNU
    >>> stands
    >>> for GNUs Not UNIX). UNIX was just a good starting point. Many years
    >>> (decades?) on they still haven't finished the kernel (Hurd) so everyone
    >>> uses the Linux kernel (which is a UNIX clone) instead.
    >>>

    >>
    >> <yawn
    >>
    >>
    >> .> So Linux is not a "cheap and nasty knock-off of Windows"
    >>>

    >>
    >> From the consumere's perspective, yes it is.

    >
    > That may well be so. And it is sad that things have been allowed to get to
    > this point. The sooner this is corrected the better.
    >


    What are you going to do? Beat customers into submission?

    >>>> "Where consumers have returned machines, Finch said, it wasn't because
    >>>> of technical problems but because they'd bought a low-priced machine
    >>>> expecting Windows and opened it to find a different interface....Issues
    >>>> persist, particularly in battery life and power consumption, as well as
    >>>> with the number of applications available from major ISVs that run on
    >>>> Linux."
    >>>>
    >>>> It always comes down to applications. When will the nixheads learn?
    >>>
    >>> That would be a good point if these "Netbook" things were designed as
    >>> just cheap laptops. As the name "netbook" implies, these are designed
    >>> for
    >>> *Internet Applications* (Gmail, facebook, the Google Office thing, etc).
    >>> For this purpose Linux does the job just fine and at a much lower price
    >>> than Windows.

    >>
    >> And yet many people continue to return these machines after discovering
    >> that Linux is not Windows. Go figure.

    >
    > I believe the article was about how people were *not* returning them
    > because
    > of Linux.
    >


    You didn't read the article did you? Did you seriously think that a Larry
    D'Loser excerpt was an honesta account?

    "Where consumers have returned machines, Finch said, it wasn't because of
    technical problems but because they'd bought a low-priced machine
    expecting Windows and opened it to find a different interface....Issues
    persist, particularly in battery life and power consumption, as well as
    with the number of applications available from major ISVs that run on
    Linux."

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/08/12/dell_reality_linux_windows_netbooks/


    >>> People don't complain when their Cellphone can't run Office
    >>> 2007 do they? Why should it be any different with Netbooks?

    >>
    >> Many a product has died with the marketing gurus behind it asking exactly
    >> that sort of question. Lesson: The customer is always right.
    >>
    >>> If people want to run Office or play Halo they should buy a real laptop.
    >>> One
    >>> with a proper sized keyboard and screen, a faster CPU and lots of RAM.

    >>
    >> I'm thinking that anyone who wants to do anything that doesn't involve
    >> squinting at an 8-10 inch screen should buy a real laptop. Why the
    >> nixhead
    >> fascination with these under-powered and ultrimately very disappointing
    >> netbooks?

    >
    > I quite agree. I tried typing on a friends Eee PC and found the keyboard
    > rather uncomfortable to use.
    >
    > I do not think these systems are fascinating because of the hardware -
    > they
    > are, as you pointed out, by no means remarkable. I suspect some find them
    > interesting because they are perhaps a sign that things are changing.
    > Microsoft Corporations Operating System monopoly is perhaps not as strong
    > as it once was or appeared to be. Others (such as Google) appear to have
    > noticed and are trying to take advantage of this.
    >
    > The strength of Windows has traditionally been based on the difficulty of
    > writing portable software as you have so often pointed out. The problem
    > for
    > Microsoft is that writing portable software isn't actually difficult
    > anymore. As more developers realise this, Microsofts position becomes
    > weaker.


    The best desktop software todays runs on either Windows or Mac OsX. Everyone
    knows that. You can dismiss this as an effect of "monopoly" if you like, but
    you're just kidding yourself. Portable, unportable -- Who cares? Build
    better applications, then customers will follow you. It's as simple -- amd
    challenging -- as that.
    impossible, Aug 15, 2009
    #12
  13. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    impossible Guest

    "David Goodwin" <> wrote in message
    news:h65a8i$jk2$-september.org...
    > whoisthis wrote:
    >
    >> In article
    >> <>,
    >> peterwn <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Aug 14, 1:33 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    >>> central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >>> > It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >>> > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.
    >>>
    >>> Suffice to say that there is nothing that the OEM's would like better
    >>> than to be rid of Microsoft's stranglehold on the desktop software
    >>> market.

    >>
    >> Why ?, its not going to improve their profit margins...
    >> Truth is they could walk away any time they like and install linux on
    >> 100% of their machines...... but they know they can not do that, it
    >> would kill them.

    >
    > I suppose selling linux systems gives them more freedom. They can
    > customise
    > their Linux systems to a far greater extent (custom GUI for a Netbook for
    > example). Linux supports more hardware too - Windows NT hasn't run on a
    > MIPS CPU since the 90s and its never run on ARM as far as I know.


    This is religious mumbo-jumbo, not business.
    impossible, Aug 15, 2009
    #13
  14. In message <>, whoisthis wrote:

    > Unless the platform will run the applications they want it is worthless.


    I guess you're never going to understand what a netbook is for until Apple
    comes up with one, are you?
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Aug 15, 2009
    #14
  15. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <h65a8i$jk2$-september.org>,
    > David Goodwin <> wrote:
    >
    >> whoisthis wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article
    >>> <>,
    >>> peterwn <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Aug 14, 1:33Â pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    >>>> central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >>>>> It's starting to make Microsoft look desperate
    >>>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=5177>.
    >>>> Suffice to say that there is nothing that the OEM's would like better
    >>>> than to be rid of Microsoft's stranglehold on the desktop software
    >>>> market.
    >>> Why ?, its not going to improve their profit margins...
    >>> Truth is they could walk away any time they like and install linux on
    >>> 100% of their machines...... but they know they can not do that, it
    >>> would kill them.

    >> I suppose selling linux systems gives them more freedom. They can customise
    >> their Linux systems to a far greater extent (custom GUI for a Netbook for
    >> example). Linux supports more hardware too - Windows NT hasn't run on a
    >> MIPS CPU since the 90s and its never run on ARM as far as I know.

    >
    > All of which for 90% plus of consumers comes down to "who cares"...
    > Unless the platform will run the applications they want it is worthless.


    Good point, from the browser statistics quoted in other threads, Safari
    seems to be a complete flop.
    victor, Aug 15, 2009
    #15
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