laserjet ram, what's it for?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by allsorts, Jul 19, 2004.

  1. allsorts

    allsorts Guest

    I have a hp laserjet iii and wonder what the expanded ram is good for, what
    is the advantage of having more ram?
    allsorts, Jul 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. allsorts

    John B Guest

    allsorts wrote:
    > I have a hp laserjet iii and wonder what the expanded ram is good
    > for, what is the advantage of having more ram?


    Probably postscript. More ram means bigger images etc can be printed with half
    tones.

    --
    John B
    John B, Jul 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. In article <CdIKc.9116$>,
    says...
    > allsorts wrote:
    > > I have a hp laserjet iii and wonder what the expanded ram is good
    > > for, what is the advantage of having more ram?

    >
    > Probably postscript. More ram means bigger images etc can be printed with half
    > tones.


    Also applies when priting complex documents in say desktop publishing. On
    my 4L with onlt 1MB ram, sometimes I get only part of a document printed
    because the printer runs out of memory.
    Patrick Dunford, Jul 19, 2004
    #3
  4. allsorts

    Daver Guest

    Try printing a page full of graphics and you'll find out. Unlike inkjets and
    some cheaper laserjets this hp has to load the full page into memory prior
    to printing it.


    "allsorts" <kazuga@guitar> wrote in message news:...
    > I have a hp laserjet iii and wonder what the expanded ram is good for,

    what
    > is the advantage of having more ram?
    >
    >
    Daver, Jul 19, 2004
    #4
  5. allsorts

    allsorts Guest

    Thanks for this and the previous replies by others.
    So if I understand correctly the memory is used for 2 things, 1 to load
    software fonts into and 2 to store the document before printing and
    therefore you must have enough memory to hold the entire page in the printer
    memory. I have 5Mb of printer memory which is the maximum for this printer I
    think.
    I just tried printing a 8.4Mb tiff photo and it printed no problem, this
    exceeded the 5Mb memory I have but I noticed that it was printed very
    quickly as if it was not loaded into the printer memory first, I have
    noticed some documents taking quite a while to load into the printer before
    printing so I can only assume that something's load to printer memory and
    others just go straight go through without been loaded into printer memory
    first, I would like to know why something's do this and some don't.
    Also in this day and age is there any need to download fonts to the printer
    memory, I am wondering if this is what causes the slow download to printer
    on some documents as I just explained above i.e. are fonts automatically
    downloaded to the printer memory before printing a document so that if I
    print a webpage for example the font needs to download first before the page
    is printed and this is what causes the delay. Or am I way off base? If not
    then I guess the purpose of manually downloading fonts or having a font
    cartridge is so that pages using these fonts are printed quicker.


    "Daver" <> wrote in message
    news:cdfsnj$opf$...
    > Try printing a page full of graphics and you'll find out. Unlike inkjets

    and
    > some cheaper laserjets this hp has to load the full page into memory prior
    > to printing it.
    >
    >
    > "allsorts" <kazuga@guitar> wrote in message news:...
    > > I have a hp laserjet iii and wonder what the expanded ram is good for,

    > what
    > > is the advantage of having more ram?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    allsorts, Jul 19, 2004
    #5
  6. allsorts

    allsorts Guest

    Woops I have never top posted before except when a thread is already in top
    posting mode, it's never happened in all these years, don't know why it
    happened now, maybe my brain is getting confused by the top posting I have
    to do in threads that are already in top posting mode, something that was
    less common in earlier years and therefore my brain didn't get confused.
    Anyhow I thought I should mention that I am not using page protection which
    if I understand correctly forces the document to be loaded to printer memory
    first although I thought this happened anyway so am a bit confused.


    "allsorts" <kazuga@guitar> wrote in message news:...
    > Thanks for this and the previous replies by others.
    > So if I understand correctly the memory is used for 2 things, 1 to load
    > software fonts into and 2 to store the document before printing and
    > therefore you must have enough memory to hold the entire page in the

    printer
    > memory. I have 5Mb of printer memory which is the maximum for this printer

    I
    > think.
    > I just tried printing a 8.4Mb tiff photo and it printed no problem, this
    > exceeded the 5Mb memory I have but I noticed that it was printed very
    > quickly as if it was not loaded into the printer memory first, I have
    > noticed some documents taking quite a while to load into the printer

    before
    > printing so I can only assume that something's load to printer memory and
    > others just go straight go through without been loaded into printer memory
    > first, I would like to know why something's do this and some don't.
    > Also in this day and age is there any need to download fonts to the

    printer
    > memory, I am wondering if this is what causes the slow download to printer
    > on some documents as I just explained above i.e. are fonts automatically
    > downloaded to the printer memory before printing a document so that if I
    > print a webpage for example the font needs to download first before the

    page
    > is printed and this is what causes the delay. Or am I way off base? If not
    > then I guess the purpose of manually downloading fonts or having a font
    > cartridge is so that pages using these fonts are printed quicker.
    >
    >
    > "Daver" <> wrote in message
    > news:cdfsnj$opf$...
    > > Try printing a page full of graphics and you'll find out. Unlike inkjets

    > and
    > > some cheaper laserjets this hp has to load the full page into memory

    prior
    > > to printing it.
    > >
    > >
    > > "allsorts" <kazuga@guitar> wrote in message

    news:...
    > > > I have a hp laserjet iii and wonder what the expanded ram is good for,

    > > what
    > > > is the advantage of having more ram?
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    allsorts, Jul 20, 2004
    #6
  7. allsorts

    AD. Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 10:43:04 +1200, allsorts wrote:

    > Thanks for this and the previous replies by others. So if I understand
    > correctly the memory is used for 2 things, 1 to load software fonts into
    > and 2 to store the document before printing and therefore you must have
    > enough memory to hold the entire page in the printer memory. I have 5Mb of
    > printer memory which is the maximum for this printer I think.
    > I just tried printing a 8.4Mb tiff photo and it printed no problem, this
    > exceeded the 5Mb memory I have but I noticed that it was printed very
    > quickly as if it was not loaded into the printer memory first.


    I'm not exactly certain, but I don't think it's the size of the input data
    that matters, rather the size of the print job when converted to it's
    printer language ie PCL, PS etc.

    Whether or not a 8.4MB tiff takes up less than 5MB when converted I have
    no idea. But if it was a colour photo it could be losing a lot of colour
    depth info going to a black and white printer. Also from memory tiffs
    either have no compression, or a method that isn't very aggressive - I
    have no idea what compression PCL uses, but that could be a factor.

    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Jul 20, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    says...

    > Whether or not a 8.4MB tiff takes up less than 5MB when converted I have
    > no idea. But if it was a colour photo it could be losing a lot of colour
    > depth info going to a black and white printer. Also from memory tiffs
    > either have no compression, or a method that isn't very aggressive - I
    > have no idea what compression PCL uses, but that could be a factor.


    Tiffs use some form of LZW compression, but I think there are different
    compression options available when creating them.
    Patrick Dunford, Jul 20, 2004
    #8
  9. Patrick Dunford wrote:
    > Tiffs use some form of LZW compression, but I think there are different
    > compression options available when creating them.


    I thought that they were images with pagination, ie, suitable for faxes
    etc that have multiple pages.

    Im not sure that I have used the correct term, but thats the format that
    I have seen faxes in on a number of different packages.

    Someone here at work says that the original tiff used LZW, but it is
    usually a container format that can hold other file formats ie, jpegs etc.
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Jul 20, 2004
    #9
  10. allsorts

    allsorts Guest

    "AD." <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 10:43:04 +1200, allsorts wrote:
    >
    > > Thanks for this and the previous replies by others. So if I understand
    > > correctly the memory is used for 2 things, 1 to load software fonts into
    > > and 2 to store the document before printing and therefore you must have
    > > enough memory to hold the entire page in the printer memory. I have 5Mb

    of
    > > printer memory which is the maximum for this printer I think.
    > > I just tried printing a 8.4Mb tiff photo and it printed no problem, this
    > > exceeded the 5Mb memory I have but I noticed that it was printed very
    > > quickly as if it was not loaded into the printer memory first.

    >
    > I'm not exactly certain, but I don't think it's the size of the input data
    > that matters, rather the size of the print job when converted to it's
    > printer language ie PCL, PS etc.
    >
    > Whether or not a 8.4MB tiff takes up less than 5MB when converted I have
    > no idea. But if it was a colour photo it could be losing a lot of colour
    > depth info going to a black and white printer. Also from memory tiffs
    > either have no compression, or a method that isn't very aggressive - I
    > have no idea what compression PCL uses, but that could be a factor.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Anton


    Thanks, yes it is a colour photo and when the colour info is taken out could
    well be smaller than 5Mb, I didn't think of that, good point. This tiff file
    has no compression, it was originally a jpeg file which I converted to tiff
    with no compression.
    From what I understand now though it would not matter if the file was bigger
    than 5 Mb as without page protection on, the printer will just print the
    file on the fly as it comes from the computer without trying to store the
    complete file in it's memory.
    allsorts, Jul 20, 2004
    #10
  11. allsorts

    AD. Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 13:22:27 +1200, Patrick Dunford wrote:

    > Tiffs use some form of LZW compression, but I think there are different
    > compression options available when creating them.


    The compression options are usually either just 'on' or 'off' :)

    And I think 'on' does use LZW as you said (it's been a while).

    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Jul 20, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <>, dave@no_spam_here_dave.net.nz
    says...
    > Patrick Dunford wrote:
    > > Tiffs use some form of LZW compression, but I think there are different
    > > compression options available when creating them.

    >
    > I thought that they were images with pagination, ie, suitable for faxes
    > etc that have multiple pages.


    No, as far as I know a Tiff is just another way of describing an image.
    Patrick Dunford, Jul 20, 2004
    #12
  13. allsorts

    AD. Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 13:31:17 +1200, Dave - Dave.net.nz wrote:

    > Patrick Dunford wrote:
    >> Tiffs use some form of LZW compression, but I think there are different
    >> compression options available when creating them.

    >
    > I thought that they were images with pagination, ie, suitable for faxes
    > etc that have multiple pages.


    Most tiff images don't have that pagination stuff, but you're right some
    do.

    The faxes that get emailed to us from our VoIP system are like that with
    multiple pages - only a few of the graphics viewers understand it. Most
    viewers will only show you the first page.

    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., Jul 20, 2004
    #13
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