lady in white- DVD rotter?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by StefP, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. StefP

    StefP Guest

    I have a copy of Lady in White special edition that I had not watched in a
    while (maybe a year or two). I decided to watch it this afternoon and put it
    in the DVD player and NOTHING! I have now tried 4 different DVD players
    including one in my computer and nothing.

    Is this a title that is known to go bad? Help anyone. This is one movie that
    I love and I am hoping for a glimmer of light. Is it possible that it just
    needs some sort of treatment to bring it back?


    Thanks in advance for any help/ advise....
    Stef
     
    StefP, Feb 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. StefP

    Scot Gardner Guest

    "StefP" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    <<I have a copy of Lady in White special edition that I had not watched
    in a while (maybe a year or two). I decided to watch it this afternoon
    and put it in the DVD player and NOTHING! I have now tried 4 different
    DVD players including one in my computer and nothing.>>

    <<Is this a title that is known to go bad? Help anyone. This is one
    movie that I love and I am hoping for a glimmer of light. Is it possible
    that it just needs some sort of treatment to bring it back? Thanks in
    advance for any help/ advise.... Stef>>


    By "NOTHING!", do you mean your players do absolutely nothing, or do
    they say something like, "disk error" or "no disk"? _Lady in White_
    (1988) is a dual-layer disk, which is out of print, so I understand your
    concern.

    All of my rotted DVDs have been dual-layer Warner pressings and the disk
    rot was always located on the second layer. (The layer indicator of my
    Sony players confirmed this.) For some reason, the splash screen (the
    first image you see, made up of the WB emblem in front of blue sky) on
    some early Warner disks was located on the second layer. This meant that
    a rotted disk might actually allow a player access to its first layer,
    but because the initialization took place on the rotted second layer,
    the disk wouldn't play.

    The first signs of disk rot are digital blocking and snow. Once the rot
    begins, it only gets worse. One day I put a rotting Warner disk into the
    player and the splash screen barely played and was full of snow and
    audio drop outs. After this, the disk went to the menu and then played
    normally -- until the layer change, when the snow and audio problems
    came back. Finally, digital blocking became so bad that the player
    locked up.

    I am guessing that your disk may have its splash screen located on its
    rotted second layer. This disk is probably so badly rotted that it will
    not play on any player. Rotted disks cannot be salvaged.
     
    Scot Gardner, Feb 15, 2004
    #2
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  3. StefP

    StefP Guest

    In one player, the player response is that the disc is dirty. I have cleaned
    the disc and nothing changes.
    In another ( an older sharp player) the player keeps ejecting the disc. I
    take extreme care of my discs and this one has no scratches or fogging on
    the playing surface.

    This one is going to be expensive to replace. Does anyone else have the same
    problem?

    "Scot Gardner" <> wrote in message
    news:20040214233701.817$...
    > "StefP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    > <<I have a copy of Lady in White special edition that I had not watched
    > in a while (maybe a year or two). I decided to watch it this afternoon
    > and put it in the DVD player and NOTHING! I have now tried 4 different
    > DVD players including one in my computer and nothing.>>
    >
    > <<Is this a title that is known to go bad? Help anyone. This is one
    > movie that I love and I am hoping for a glimmer of light. Is it possible
    > that it just needs some sort of treatment to bring it back? Thanks in
    > advance for any help/ advise.... Stef>>
    >
    >
    > By "NOTHING!", do you mean your players do absolutely nothing, or do
    > they say something like, "disk error" or "no disk"? _Lady in White_
    > (1988) is a dual-layer disk, which is out of print, so I understand your
    > concern.
    >
    > All of my rotted DVDs have been dual-layer Warner pressings and the disk
    > rot was always located on the second layer. (The layer indicator of my
    > Sony players confirmed this.) For some reason, the splash screen (the
    > first image you see, made up of the WB emblem in front of blue sky) on
    > some early Warner disks was located on the second layer. This meant that
    > a rotted disk might actually allow a player access to its first layer,
    > but because the initialization took place on the rotted second layer,
    > the disk wouldn't play.
    >
    > The first signs of disk rot are digital blocking and snow. Once the rot
    > begins, it only gets worse. One day I put a rotting Warner disk into the
    > player and the splash screen barely played and was full of snow and
    > audio drop outs. After this, the disk went to the menu and then played
    > normally -- until the layer change, when the snow and audio problems
    > came back. Finally, digital blocking became so bad that the player
    > locked up.
    >
    > I am guessing that your disk may have its splash screen located on its
    > rotted second layer. This disk is probably so badly rotted that it will
    > not play on any player. Rotted disks cannot be salvaged.
    >
    >
    >
     
    StefP, Feb 15, 2004
    #3
  4. Has anyone compiled a list of rotting DVDs?



    --
    Reply address munged. You can figure it out.
     
    CAndersen (Kimba), Feb 15, 2004
    #4
  5. StefP

    .@. Guest

    On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 19:00:17 -0800, "StefP" <>
    wrote:

    >I have a copy of Lady in White special edition that I had not watched in a
    >while (maybe a year or two). I decided to watch it this afternoon and put it
    >in the DVD player and NOTHING! I have now tried 4 different DVD players
    >including one in my computer and nothing.
    >
    >Is this a title that is known to go bad? Help anyone. This is one movie that
    >I love and I am hoping for a glimmer of light. Is it possible that it just
    >needs some sort of treatment to bring it back?
    >
    >
    >Thanks in advance for any help/ advise....
    >Stef
    >


    Now you know why VHS is better !!!!!
     
    .@., Feb 15, 2004
    #5
  6. StefP

    StefP Guest

    I don't believe that. I have this movie somewhere is my husband's laser disc
    collection. The DVD is just easier to find, store and play. (until this
    little glitch)

    We can spend all day fighting about which format is the best. Tapes break,
    Lasers and DVDs rot.

    Has anyone else found titles that are prone to rot?

    <.@.> wrote in message news:...
    > On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 19:00:17 -0800, "StefP" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I have a copy of Lady in White special edition that I had not watched in

    a
    > >while (maybe a year or two). I decided to watch it this afternoon and put

    it
    > >in the DVD player and NOTHING! I have now tried 4 different DVD players
    > >including one in my computer and nothing.
    > >
    > >Is this a title that is known to go bad? Help anyone. This is one movie

    that
    > >I love and I am hoping for a glimmer of light. Is it possible that it

    just
    > >needs some sort of treatment to bring it back?
    > >
    > >
    > >Thanks in advance for any help/ advise....
    > >Stef
    > >

    >
    > Now you know why VHS is better !!!!!
    >
     
    StefP, Feb 15, 2004
    #6
  7. StefP

    Thomas Bell Guest

    StefP wrote:
    > I don't believe that. I have this movie somewhere is my husband's laser disc
    > collection. The DVD is just easier to find, store and play. (until this
    > little glitch)
    >
    > We can spend all day fighting about which format is the best. Tapes break,
    > Lasers and DVDs rot.
    >
    > Has anyone else found titles that are prone to rot?


    The original issue of "Kentucky Fried Movie" is a well known rotter and
    has since been replaced. Also many of Anchor Bay's Hammer horror
    titles, notably "Frankenstein Created Women" have widely been reported
    as rotting and in fact, Anchor Bay will replace defective dvds if you
    write them.

    T.B.
     
    Thomas Bell, Feb 15, 2004
    #7
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