KVM Switch - 2-port; Dual DVI; USB + Audio

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by autodeletespam@earthlink.net, Jan 5, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I am look for a KVM switch with the following characteristics:
    2-port
    Dual DVI displays
    USB mouse (I realize that I could use a USB to PS/2 connector but would
    prefer native USB)
    USB keyboard
    Audio switching (both speaker and mic)
    Extra integrated 2 port switching USB hub
    Under $300

    I do NOT need dual link (1600 X 1200 is more than enough for me).

    Most of the kvm switches out there seem to be designed for computers
    circa 1999-2000. Surely I cannot be the only person in the known
    universe that has purchased 2 computers after 2002 and needs a
    up-to-date switch? I am not trying to sound snobby cause at this point
    neither of my machines is anywhere close to state-of-the-art, but I
    swear that I saw some of the switches that I have recently researched
    in that moive "Wargames" from the 80s. Do they even make mice with
    PS/2 connections any more? :)

    Do you know of a KVM switch that meets my needs (described above)? If
    not, what types of software do you typically run and what KVM switch
    are you using? And what has been your experience? I am definitely
    interested in reliability/performance data. Can you point me to a site
    with a comparative review of new KVM switches. Other than a single
    model "first look" type article, it looks like Tom's has not done a big
    review in about 2 years and it is even longer for AnandTech.

    The StarTech SV231UADVI is close but only supports one display.
    The StarTech SV221DVIDD has dual display but lacks most the rest.
    The NTI KEEMUX-P2V-2 looks like a rebadged but more expensive (?)
    StarTech SV221DD (which also will not work).
    The Cables to Go C184-32562 also looks like a rebadged (but less
    expensive) SV221DD.
    The Aten CS1762 is also close but also only supports one DVI display.
    The Aten CS1742 is also close but has VGA rather than DVI display (and
    I am not sure if it really switches audio).
    Belkin does not have anything that fits the bill and I have read
    nothing but bad reviews of their switches.
    The IOGear GCS1762, like the SV321UADVI and CS1762 is very close but
    lacks the dual display support.
    Adder does not have anything close in the price range.
    The Avocent 2SVDVI10-001 is another possibility but again only supports
    one display.
    The TrendNet TK-204K, a very low cost alternative, is missing several
    needed parts.
    The Gefen EXT-DVI-422 is probably the closest match that I have found
    but it is grossly overpriced.

    Running Windows XP on both machines (although one of them is actually
    configured to also run Linux). Monitors are Dell 2005FP and Dell
    1905FP. Using an nVidia card in one and an ATI in the other.
    Keyboards are Microsoft Natural Keyboard Elite and an old plain IBM
    keyboard (not sure if it has a name or model number but this is the one
    that I will dump anyway unless the Natural will not work). Mice are
    Logitech and a generic cheapie model. Speakers are generic 5.1. Not
    sure what brand the mic is. Don't think that it matters but one rig
    has an ASUS mainboard and the other is DFI LanParty.

    Might also consider a 4-port (if it is not too much more expensive and
    meets the requirements above) to get my Thinkpad T42 into the mix.
    , Jan 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. Bob I Guest

    Why spam the world when google exists?

    wrote:

    > I am look for a KVM switch with the following characteristics:
    > 2-port
    > Dual DVI displays
    > USB mouse (I realize that I could use a USB to PS/2 connector but would
    > prefer native USB)
    > USB keyboard
    > Audio switching (both speaker and mic)
    > Extra integrated 2 port switching USB hub
    > Under $300
    >
    > I do NOT need dual link (1600 X 1200 is more than enough for me).
    >
    > Most of the kvm switches out there seem to be designed for computers
    > circa 1999-2000. Surely I cannot be the only person in the known
    > universe that has purchased 2 computers after 2002 and needs a
    > up-to-date switch? I am not trying to sound snobby cause at this point
    > neither of my machines is anywhere close to state-of-the-art, but I
    > swear that I saw some of the switches that I have recently researched
    > in that moive "Wargames" from the 80s. Do they even make mice with
    > PS/2 connections any more? :)
    >
    > Do you know of a KVM switch that meets my needs (described above)? If
    > not, what types of software do you typically run and what KVM switch
    > are you using? And what has been your experience? I am definitely
    > interested in reliability/performance data. Can you point me to a site
    > with a comparative review of new KVM switches. Other than a single
    > model "first look" type article, it looks like Tom's has not done a big
    > review in about 2 years and it is even longer for AnandTech.
    >
    > The StarTech SV231UADVI is close but only supports one display.
    > The StarTech SV221DVIDD has dual display but lacks most the rest.
    > The NTI KEEMUX-P2V-2 looks like a rebadged but more expensive (?)
    > StarTech SV221DD (which also will not work).
    > The Cables to Go C184-32562 also looks like a rebadged (but less
    > expensive) SV221DD.
    > The Aten CS1762 is also close but also only supports one DVI display.
    > The Aten CS1742 is also close but has VGA rather than DVI display (and
    > I am not sure if it really switches audio).
    > Belkin does not have anything that fits the bill and I have read
    > nothing but bad reviews of their switches.
    > The IOGear GCS1762, like the SV321UADVI and CS1762 is very close but
    > lacks the dual display support.
    > Adder does not have anything close in the price range.
    > The Avocent 2SVDVI10-001 is another possibility but again only supports
    > one display.
    > The TrendNet TK-204K, a very low cost alternative, is missing several
    > needed parts.
    > The Gefen EXT-DVI-422 is probably the closest match that I have found
    > but it is grossly overpriced.
    >
    > Running Windows XP on both machines (although one of them is actually
    > configured to also run Linux). Monitors are Dell 2005FP and Dell
    > 1905FP. Using an nVidia card in one and an ATI in the other.
    > Keyboards are Microsoft Natural Keyboard Elite and an old plain IBM
    > keyboard (not sure if it has a name or model number but this is the one
    > that I will dump anyway unless the Natural will not work). Mice are
    > Logitech and a generic cheapie model. Speakers are generic 5.1. Not
    > sure what brand the mic is. Don't think that it matters but one rig
    > has an ASUS mainboard and the other is DFI LanParty.
    >
    > Might also consider a 4-port (if it is not too much more expensive and
    > meets the requirements above) to get my Thinkpad T42 into the mix.
    >
    Bob I, Jan 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Not everybody uses Google Many technology professionals use a tool
    called a NewsReader (Agent is good one and there are many others) to
    follow various newsgroups. And, in fact, this was the primary way to
    keep up with news before Google as these newsreaders provide a much
    more efficient interface to digest large amounts of information. One
    of the nice things about newsreaders is that they keep track of which
    newsgroups the uswer is interested in and which posts have already been
    read. However, don't get me wrong. I think Google is a great tool for
    many things and I do appreciate that Google is hosting the newgroup
    archive.

    Do not be concerned with your misuse of the term "spam." It is a
    common mistake for newsgroup users. What I did is called
    cross-posting. "Cross-posting" is the term used when a user has a
    message that logically fits in more than one category (or news group).
    Since I am asking a quesiton that few people will have the correct
    answer for (as it involves a fairly unique situation) and since the
    folks that may actually have an answer do not all necessarily follow
    the same newsgroup, I am maximizing the possibility of getting a
    response that actually has some useful information.
    , Jan 6, 2006
    #3
  4. kony Guest

    On 6 Jan 2006 06:04:34 -0800,
    wrote:

    >Not everybody uses Google Many technology professionals use a tool
    >called a NewsReader (Agent is good one and there are many others) to
    >follow various newsgroups. And, in fact, this was the primary way to
    >keep up with news before Google as these newsreaders provide a much
    >more efficient interface to digest large amounts of information. One
    >of the nice things about newsreaders is that they keep track of which
    >newsgroups the uswer is interested in and which posts have already been
    >read. However, don't get me wrong. I think Google is a great tool for
    >many things and I do appreciate that Google is hosting the newgroup
    >archive.


    He may have meant, Google for products, actively seek one
    for purchase instead of asking.

    >Do not be concerned with your misuse of the term "spam." It is a
    >common mistake for newsgroup users. What I did is called
    >cross-posting. "Cross-posting" is the term used when a user has a
    >message that logically fits in more than one category (or news group).
    >Since I am asking a quesiton that few people will have the correct
    >answer for (as it involves a fairly unique situation)


    Hold on there, if your desire is so common as you suggested
    previously, all the more reason why your excessive
    cross-posting is unwarranted.

    We are NOT your personal shopper service, and it is
    incredibly rude to post to all these groups.

    Guess what genius? Everyone using usenet has a keyboard so
    every single group would be fit. WRONG. Only the
    applicable groups would be, those dealing specfically with
    PC peripherals.

    >and since the
    >folks that may actually have an answer do not all necessarily follow
    >the same newsgroup, I am maximizing the possibility of getting a
    >response that actually has some useful information.


    Nope, you're selfishly misusing usenet.

    If every pinhead out there posted to every group that was
    only vaguely connected to a topic, there would be no useful
    purpose to the individual groups which were expressly set up
    to segregate.

    The useful information is that you don't need a KVM, you
    need to learn the simplest of tasks- use a search engine to
    find a common product for purchase. You might even try
    using some of the more obvious keywords if you just don't
    understand search engines (LOL), like "USB DVI KVM"... takes
    about 5 seconds to find tons of hits, 2,910,000 hits to be
    exact.
    kony, Jan 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Chuck F. Guest

    wrote:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    > Do not be concerned with your misuse of the term "spam." It is
    > a common mistake for newsgroup users. What I did is called
    > cross-posting. "Cross-posting" is the term used when a user has
    > a message that logically fits in more than one category (or news
    > group). Since I am asking a quesiton that few people will have
    > the correct answer for (as it involves a fairly unique
    > situation) and since the folks that may actually have an answer
    > do not all necessarily follow the same newsgroup, I am
    > maximizing the possibility of getting a response that actually
    > has some useful information.


    However you failed to set follow-ups to the one principle group
    that you use. If someone is interested they can follow the thread
    there. Meanwhile you have attracted whatever immediate interest
    there is. The follow-up prevents developing a monster. When you
    fail to do so nobody can resolve the prime newsgroup later.

    Your failure there leaves your post firmly in the nuisance category.

    --
    "If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
    More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
    w
    Chuck F., Jan 6, 2006
    #5
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