Koozed External drive?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Tony in Oz, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    Gidday folks, on a trip to NZ last week, I was showing some mates the photos
    on my external HDD which I brought over from Aus for just this purpose. One
    of the kids knocked it off the footstool it was sitting on, onto the carpet,
    by no means a violent drop, and the thing froze up. I turned everything off,
    restarted it all, and it wouldn';t see the drive. I thought it may have
    buggered the enclosure, I;ve seen drives take far more punishment than that,
    so on returning to Aussie I bought another enclosure, and set it all up. It
    still won't see the drive. I also disassembled it, and tried the drive in my
    computer, as both master and slave, and its not being seen in the BIOS.
    There is also no noise coming from it, it seems dead. This drive has quite a
    few pictures that are thus far not backed up, yeah yeah, I know, I was gonna
    do it when I got back from holidays, and had a few more to do! and I guess I
    already know the thing is probably Koozed, but thought I'd check here to see
    if anyone knows any way of getting anything off the drive that doesn't
    involve too much outsourcing and thousands of $$$$. Ideas? Cheers Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. Tony in Oz

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Tony in Oz" typed:
    > Gidday folks, on a trip to NZ last week, I was showing some mates the
    > photos on my external HDD which I brought over from Aus for just this
    > purpose. One of the kids knocked it off the footstool it was sitting
    > on, onto the carpet, by no means a violent drop, and the thing froze
    > up. I turned everything off, restarted it all, and it wouldn';t see
    > the drive. I thought it may have buggered the enclosure, I;ve seen
    > drives take far more punishment than that, so on returning to Aussie
    > I bought another enclosure, and set it all up. It still won't see the
    > drive. I also disassembled it, and tried the drive in my computer, as
    > both master and slave, and its not being seen in the BIOS. There is
    > also no noise coming from it, it seems dead. This drive has quite a
    > few pictures that are thus far not backed up, yeah yeah, I know, I
    > was gonna do it when I got back from holidays, and had a few more to
    > do! and I guess I already know the thing is probably Koozed, but
    > thought I'd check here to see if anyone knows any way of getting
    > anything off the drive that doesn't involve too much outsourcing and
    > thousands of $$$$. Ideas? Cheers Tony


    It sounds like a head-crash. HDDs can take a lot more of a knock when
    they're not powered up than they can when they are, by a factor of about 10.
    Recovering data from a drive that's had a head-crash involves disassembly in
    a clean room.... Lots of moola and at least some of the data will be gone.

    I could be wrong, I've been wrong before.
    --
    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Jan 28, 2008
    #2
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  3. Tony in Oz

    Dave Taylor Guest

    "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in news:gThnj.7926$421.7476@news-
    server.bigpond.net.au:

    > Ideas? Cheers Tony


    So it doesn't spin up? You can usually feel a spin up.

    Try the tips here:
    http://windowssecrets.com/comp/070322/
    Scroll down to Fred's bit.
    The freezer tip did the trick for me when I needed it.
    A clean room professional service is the way to go if the data is worth
    more than what you are willing to gamble 8).


    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Jan 29, 2008
    #3
  4. Tony in Oz

    J Brockley Guest

    "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in message
    news:gThnj.7926$...
    > Gidday folks, on a trip to NZ last week, I was showing some mates the
    > photos on my external HDD which I brought over from Aus for just this
    > purpose. One of the kids knocked it off the footstool it was sitting on,
    > onto the carpet, by no means a violent drop, and the thing froze up. I
    > turned everything off, restarted it all, and it wouldn';t see the drive. I
    > thought it may have buggered the enclosure, I;ve seen drives take far more
    > punishment than that, so on returning to Aussie I bought another
    > enclosure, and set it all up. It still won't see the drive. I also
    > disassembled it, and tried the drive in my computer, as both master and
    > slave, and its not being seen in the BIOS. There is also no noise coming
    > from it, it seems dead. This drive has quite a few pictures that are thus
    > far not backed up, yeah yeah, I know, I was gonna do it when I got back
    > from holidays, and had a few more to do! and I guess I already know the
    > thing is probably Koozed, but thought I'd check here to see if anyone
    > knows any way of getting anything off the drive that doesn't involve too
    > much outsourcing and thousands of $$$$. Ideas? Cheers Tony

    A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it spinning
    up or being recognised by the bios.
    Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could try
    buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
     
    J Brockley, Jan 29, 2008
    #4
  5. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    "Dave Taylor" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9A34B67F1DB74daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6...
    > "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in news:gThnj.7926$421.7476@news-
    > server.bigpond.net.au:
    >
    >> Ideas? Cheers Tony

    >
    > So it doesn't spin up? You can usually feel a spin up.
    >
    > Try the tips here:
    > http://windowssecrets.com/comp/070322/
    > Scroll down to Fred's bit.
    > The freezer tip did the trick for me when I needed it.
    > A clean room professional service is the way to go if the data is worth
    > more than what you are willing to gamble 8).
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ciao, Dave


    Hmmm, cheers, Dave, I have one of those food savers that vaccuum packs
    stuff, I'll throw it in one of those, then into the freezer and see how it
    goes... Not holding my breath, but I will cross my fingers. Thanks for
    that.. Cheers Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 29, 2008
    #5
  6. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    Cheers Tony
    > A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    > spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    > Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could try
    > buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >

    Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else. Definitely
    no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or delicate job to
    replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 29, 2008
    #6
  7. Tony in Oz

    Lodi Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 05:23:48 +0000, Tony in Oz wrote:

    > "Dave Taylor" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9A34B67F1DB74daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6...
    >> "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in news:gThnj.7926$421.7476@news-
    >> server.bigpond.net.au:
    >>
    >>> Ideas? Cheers Tony

    >>
    >> So it doesn't spin up? You can usually feel a spin up.
    >>
    >> Try the tips here:
    >> http://windowssecrets.com/comp/070322/ Scroll down to Fred's bit.
    >> The freezer tip did the trick for me when I needed it. A clean room
    >> professional service is the way to go if the data is worth more than
    >> what you are willing to gamble 8).
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ciao, Dave

    >
    > Hmmm, cheers, Dave, I have one of those food savers that vaccuum
    > packs
    > stuff, I'll throw it in one of those, then into the freezer and see how
    > it goes... Not holding my breath, but I will cross my fingers. Thanks
    > for that.. Cheers Tony


    Freezer bag has worked for me on three different drives. Managed to grab
    the data and run.

    Lodi
     
    Lodi, Jan 29, 2008
    #7
  8. Tony in Oz

    Richard Guest

    Tony in Oz wrote:
    > Cheers Tony
    >> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    >> Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could try
    >> buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >>

    > Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    > noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else. Definitely
    > no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or delicate job to
    > replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony


    Reseat the circuit board on the contacts to the mechanics first, it may
    have moved slightly and now be misalligned.
     
    Richard, Jan 29, 2008
    #8
  9. In article <fnmcms$av9$>, J Brockley did write:

    > A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    > spinning up or being recognised by the bios.


    How is it going to spin up once the heads have embedded themselves in the
    surface of the platters?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 29, 2008
    #9
  10. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    "Dave Taylor" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9A34B67F1DB74daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6...
    > "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in news:gThnj.7926$421.7476@news-
    > server.bigpond.net.au:
    >
    >> Ideas? Cheers Tony

    >
    > So it doesn't spin up? You can usually feel a spin up.
    >
    > Try the tips here:
    > http://windowssecrets.com/comp/070322/
    > Scroll down to Fred's bit.
    > The freezer tip did the trick for me when I needed it.
    > A clean room professional service is the way to go if the data is worth
    > more than what you are willing to gamble 8).
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ciao, Dave


    Tried the freezer trick, Dave, and it didn't do very much. Made some
    ugly clacking/knocking noises and still didn't spin up, and still wasn't
    seen in the BIOS. I'm thinking she's well and truly dead. RIP. I won't
    discard it just yet, I'm out in the bush here, and I will take it into
    Bundaberg or Hervey bay next time I go during the week and see if theres
    someone there with more workshop/tools/knowhow than I have here, and might
    be able to do something with it, as I'd be pretty keen to at least get the
    photos back. Cheere Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 29, 2008
    #10
  11. Tony in Oz

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Tony in Oz" typed:
    > "Dave Taylor" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9A34B67F1DB74daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6...
    >> "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in news:gThnj.7926$421.7476@news-
    >> server.bigpond.net.au:
    >>
    >>> Ideas? Cheers Tony

    >>
    >> So it doesn't spin up? You can usually feel a spin up.
    >>
    >> Try the tips here:
    >> http://windowssecrets.com/comp/070322/
    >> Scroll down to Fred's bit.
    >> The freezer tip did the trick for me when I needed it.
    >> A clean room professional service is the way to go if the data is
    >> worth more than what you are willing to gamble 8).
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ciao, Dave

    >
    > Tried the freezer trick, Dave, and it didn't do very much. Made
    > some ugly clacking/knocking noises and still didn't spin up, and
    > still wasn't seen in the BIOS. I'm thinking she's well and truly
    > dead. RIP. I won't discard it just yet, I'm out in the bush here, and
    > I will take it into Bundaberg or Hervey bay next time I go during the
    > week and see if theres someone there with more workshop/tools/knowhow
    > than I have here, and might be able to do something with it, as I'd
    > be pretty keen to at least get the photos back. Cheere Tony


    Hi Tony,

    This is precisely why I didn't mention the 'freezer trick' to you as, IMO,
    you had a head crash and the freezer trick can do far more damage to the
    platters/data ("ugly clacking/knocking noises") and is rarely successful
    with a HDD that has had a head crash. It's primary use is to utilise the
    fact that metals shrink at low temperatures, with different metals shrinking
    at different rates and is used mainly with old drives where the bearings
    have seized. Most definiately not what happened with your drive.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Jan 30, 2008
    #11
  12. Tony in Oz

    J Brockley Guest

    "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in message
    news:1Oynj.8527$...
    >
    > Cheers Tony
    >> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    >> Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could try
    >> buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >>

    > Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    > noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else. Definitely
    > no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or delicate job to
    > replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony
    >
    >

    It may be worth going thru the act of removing it and reseating it, not a
    difficult exercise.
    The connection from circuit board to drive is not hard wired typically just
    a circuit pad against a pin or similar so maybe somethings happened there.
    I've never tried the circuit board swap simply because anytime it would have
    been useful never had access to identical drive.

    Re: head crash stopping spin up, that would have to one major head crash as
    the heads weigh nothing and are unlikely to dig in enough to stop the
    platter.
    If you get really desparate you can spin the whole drive back and forth on a
    horizontal plane which may move the platter slightly and may allow it to
    spin up. Worked for me 18 years ago but might be a last resort and drives
    where different beasts back then..
     
    J Brockley, Jan 30, 2008
    #12
  13. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    "J Brockley" <> wrote in message
    news:fnp3d5$1e9$...
    >
    > "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in message
    > news:1Oynj.8527$...
    >>
    >> Cheers Tony
    >>> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >>> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    >>> Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could
    >>> try buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >>>

    >> Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    >> noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else.
    >> Definitely no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or
    >> delicate job to replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony
    >>
    >>

    > It may be worth going thru the act of removing it and reseating it, not a
    > difficult exercise.
    > The connection from circuit board to drive is not hard wired typically
    > just a circuit pad against a pin or similar so maybe somethings happened
    > there.
    > I've never tried the circuit board swap simply because anytime it would
    > have been useful never had access to identical drive.
    >
    > Re: head crash stopping spin up, that would have to one major head crash
    > as the heads weigh nothing and are unlikely to dig in enough to stop the
    > platter.
    > If you get really desparate you can spin the whole drive back and forth on
    > a horizontal plane which may move the platter slightly and may allow it to
    > spin up. Worked for me 18 years ago but might be a last resort and drives
    > where different beasts back then..
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks J, I'll try this one tonight and see how it goes...
    Cheers Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 30, 2008
    #13
  14. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    "Richard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tony in Oz wrote:
    >> Cheers Tony
    >>> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >>> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    >>> Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could
    >>> try buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >>>

    >> Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    >> noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else.
    >> Definitely no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or
    >> delicate job to replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony

    >
    > Reseat the circuit board on the contacts to the mechanics first, it may
    > have moved slightly and now be misalligned.

    Thanks Rich, I'll give it a shot. Cheers Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 30, 2008
    #14
  15. Tony in Oz wrote:
    > Gidday folks, on a trip to NZ last week, I was showing some mates the photos
    > on my external HDD which I brought over from Aus for just this purpose. One
    > of the kids knocked it off the footstool it was sitting on, onto the carpet,
    > by no means a violent drop, and the thing froze up. I turned everything off,


    The last drive I bought was rated for a maximum acceleration of 350G.

    Let's assume a drop of 0.5m under the influence of gravity at 10 meters per
    second per second.

    Velocity(final)squared

    = Velocity(initial)squared + 2 * acceleration * displacement

    = 0 + 2 * 10 * 0.5

    = 10

    So the velocity when it hits the carpet is the square root of 10 = 3.16 metres
    per second.

    Let's assume that the carpet stops the drive in 0.010m (10mm) and ignore the
    bounce.

    0 = 10 + 2 * acceleration * 0.01

    0 = 10 + 0.02 * acceleration

    -10 = 0.02 * acceleration

    acceleration

    = -10 / 0.02

    = 500G

    Bugger.

    e&oe

    > restarted it all, and it wouldn';t see the drive. I thought it may have
    > buggered the enclosure, I;ve seen drives take far more punishment than that,
    > so on returning to Aussie I bought another enclosure, and set it all up. It
    > still won't see the drive. I also disassembled it, and tried the drive in my
    > computer, as both master and slave, and its not being seen in the BIOS.
    > There is also no noise coming from it, it seems dead. This drive has quite a
    > few pictures that are thus far not backed up, yeah yeah, I know, I was gonna
    > do it when I got back from holidays, and had a few more to do! and I guess I
    > already know the thing is probably Koozed, but thought I'd check here to see
    > if anyone knows any way of getting anything off the drive that doesn't
    > involve too much outsourcing and thousands of $$$$. Ideas? Cheers Tony


    Try and find drive diagnostic software on the manufacturer's website and elsewhere.
     
    Mark Robinson, Jan 30, 2008
    #15
  16. Tony in Oz

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Mark Robinson" typed:
    > Tony in Oz wrote:
    >> Gidday folks, on a trip to NZ last week, I was showing some mates
    >> the photos on my external HDD which I brought over from Aus for just
    >> this purpose. One of the kids knocked it off the footstool it was
    >> sitting on, onto the carpet, by no means a violent drop, and the
    >> thing froze up. I turned everything off,

    >
    > The last drive I bought was rated for a maximum acceleration of 350G.


    I'll bet you that 350G was non-operating too. Maximum *operating* shock is
    typically rated at less than 20% of non-operating shock. I'm assuming that
    the drive that was precariously perched on the stool was operating at the
    time ("showing some mates the photos"). You'd only have to nudge it hard
    with your knee to risk damaging it when it's running.

    Bugger indeed.
    --
    Shaun.

    > Let's assume a drop of 0.5m under the influence of gravity at 10
    > meters per second per second.
    >
    > Velocity(final)squared
    >
    > = Velocity(initial)squared + 2 * acceleration * displacement
    >
    > = 0 + 2 * 10 * 0.5
    >
    > = 10
    >
    > So the velocity when it hits the carpet is the square root of 10 =
    > 3.16 metres per second.
    >
    > Let's assume that the carpet stops the drive in 0.010m (10mm) and
    > ignore the bounce.
    >
    > 0 = 10 + 2 * acceleration * 0.01
    >
    > 0 = 10 + 0.02 * acceleration
    >
    > -10 = 0.02 * acceleration
    >
    > acceleration
    >
    > = -10 / 0.02
    >
    > = 500G
    >
    > Bugger.
    >
    > e&oe
    >
    >> restarted it all, and it wouldn';t see the drive. I thought it may
    >> have buggered the enclosure, I;ve seen drives take far more
    >> punishment than that, so on returning to Aussie I bought another
    >> enclosure, and set it all up. It still won't see the drive. I also
    >> disassembled it, and tried the drive in my computer, as both master
    >> and slave, and its not being seen in the BIOS. There is also no
    >> noise coming from it, it seems dead. This drive has quite a few
    >> pictures that are thus far not backed up, yeah yeah, I know, I was
    >> gonna do it when I got back from holidays, and had a few more to do!
    >> and I guess I already know the thing is probably Koozed, but thought
    >> I'd check here to see if anyone knows any way of getting anything
    >> off the drive that doesn't involve too much outsourcing and
    >> thousands of $$$$. Ideas? Cheers Tony

    >
    > Try and find drive diagnostic software on the manufacturer's website
    > and elsewhere.
     
    ~misfit~, Jan 30, 2008
    #16
  17. Tony in Oz

    J Brockley Guest

    "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    news:fnn5n3$qj0$...
    > In article <fnmcms$av9$>, J Brockley did write:
    >
    >> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.

    >
    > How is it going to spin up once the heads have embedded themselves in the
    > surface of the platters?

    I think you'll find the process of embedding heads in a platter is well nigh
    impossible. Even creating a visible scratch is requires a bit of force.
     
    J Brockley, Jan 31, 2008
    #17
  18. Tony in Oz

    Tony in Oz Guest

    "J Brockley" <> wrote in message
    news:fnp3d5$1e9$...
    >
    > "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in message
    > news:1Oynj.8527$...
    >>
    >> Cheers Tony
    >>> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >>> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    >>> Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could
    >>> try buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >>>

    >> Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    >> noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else.
    >> Definitely no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or
    >> delicate job to replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony
    >>
    >>

    > It may be worth going thru the act of removing it and reseating it, not a
    > difficult exercise.
    > The connection from circuit board to drive is not hard wired typically
    > just a circuit pad against a pin or similar so maybe somethings happened
    > there.
    > I've never tried the circuit board swap simply because anytime it would
    > have been useful never had access to identical drive.
    >
    > Re: head crash stopping spin up, that would have to one major head crash
    > as the heads weigh nothing and are unlikely to dig in enough to stop the
    > platter.
    > If you get really desparate you can spin the whole drive back and forth on
    > a horizontal plane which may move the platter slightly and may allow it to
    > spin up. Worked for me 18 years ago but might be a last resort and drives
    > where different beasts back then..
    >
    >
    >
    >

    If I shake the drive gently, I can hear a "clacking " noise similar to
    the one I hear when I put power on it. Is that any help? Cheers Tony
     
    Tony in Oz, Jan 31, 2008
    #18
  19. Tony in Oz wrote:
    > "J Brockley" <> wrote in message
    > news:fnp3d5$1e9$...
    >> "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in message
    >> news:1Oynj.8527$...
    >>> Cheers Tony
    >>>> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >>>> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.
    >>>> Therefore sounds like a electronic problem. If you are keen you could
    >>>> try buying the same drive to replace it and then swap circuit boards.
    >>>>
    >>> Thats interesting, mate, it is making a couple of little clicking
    >>> noises, I noticed when it gets power onto it, but nothing else.
    >>> Definitely no spin up. Thats another idea to consider. Is it a big or
    >>> delicate job to replace the circuit board? Cheers Tony
    >>>
    >>>

    >> It may be worth going thru the act of removing it and reseating it, not a
    >> difficult exercise.
    >> The connection from circuit board to drive is not hard wired typically
    >> just a circuit pad against a pin or similar so maybe somethings happened
    >> there.
    >> I've never tried the circuit board swap simply because anytime it would
    >> have been useful never had access to identical drive.
    >>
    >> Re: head crash stopping spin up, that would have to one major head crash
    >> as the heads weigh nothing and are unlikely to dig in enough to stop the
    >> platter.
    >> If you get really desparate you can spin the whole drive back and forth on
    >> a horizontal plane which may move the platter slightly and may allow it to
    >> spin up. Worked for me 18 years ago but might be a last resort and drives
    >> where different beasts back then..
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > If I shake the drive gently, I can hear a "clacking " noise similar to
    > the one I hear when I put power on it. Is that any help? Cheers Tony
    >
    >


    Nope, it's still pooked.

    If it makes you feel any better, I too have a hard drive on my shelf in
    similar condition (also with un-backed-up photo's on).
     
    dilberts_left_nut, Jan 31, 2008
    #19
  20. Tony in Oz

    Jerry Guest

    J Brockley wrote:
    > "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    > news:fnn5n3$qj0$...
    >> In article <fnmcms$av9$>, J Brockley did write:
    >>
    >>> A drop would likely cause a head crash but wouldn't usually stop it
    >>> spinning up or being recognised by the bios.

    >> How is it going to spin up once the heads have embedded themselves in the
    >> surface of the platters?

    > I think you'll find the process of embedding heads in a platter is well nigh
    > impossible. Even creating a visible scratch is requires a bit of force.
    >
    >

    That may be true these days, but in the good old days.....(fondly
    remembering disk enclosures full of shredded aluminium at 3:30am).
    Callouts on standby paid well
     
    Jerry, Jan 31, 2008
    #20
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    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,266
  2. slsbrooks

    External Drive has changed from H to J Drive....

    slsbrooks, May 19, 2006, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    750
    Toolman Tim
    May 19, 2006
  3. Me/PDX

    internal drive vs external drive

    Me/PDX, Jan 21, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
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    11
    Views:
    624
    Otter
    Jan 22, 2007
  4. Tony in Oz

    koozed HDD?

    Tony in Oz, Jan 28, 2008, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    823
    elaich
    Jan 29, 2008
  5. john hamilton

    files on external hard drive listed under DVD-RW Drive

    john hamilton, Nov 8, 2010, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    941
    richard
    Nov 8, 2010
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