Kodak Picture Maker - B&W problem

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bill Phillips, Jul 29, 2003.

  1. CVS drug stores have recently introduced a new 4x6" Kodak Picture
    Maker. It is cheaper and faster and easier (both for patrons and
    staff) to use. The print quality is similar, in general, to the older
    4x6" output, but on many, though not all, of my B&W prints (and I
    mostly print B&W as I am restoring old family photos), some of the
    intermediate grey tones come out with a distinctly magenta cast.

    I have found this to be true at at least two different locations.

    I am printing from greyscale JPEGs, which I have carefully resampled
    to 3072x2048 pixels (PhotoCD standard), so there should be no color
    showing up at all. And yet I get this "pinkish" tone in some of the
    grey areas.

    [Incidentally, the cost per 4x6 is $0.39@ for 1-19 prints, $0.29@ for
    20 or more. The machine allows you to select up to 25 (why not 36?)
    photos at one time, so the lab person only has to key in the password
    once per batch. The older machine, which can do 4x6 as well as 8x10,
    requires a password for each different photo, and costs $0.59 per 4x6,
    $6.99 per 8x10. IMHO, the quality of the 4x6 is superior to the 8x10.]

    All the output devices seem to be dye-sub printers. I was told they
    are made by the same manufacturer. I believe that is probably Noritsu
    (sp?).

    Any ideas as to what's up there? Any ideas on how to correct the
    problem myself, or should I just continue to point it out to the lab
    staff and hope it gets passed back to the service people?
     
    Bill Phillips, Jul 29, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bill Phillips

    Argon3 Guest

    Is this process indeed a dye-sub system or is it a tie in with the mini-lab
    equipment like the Fuji Frontier system they have at Walmart, etc.?
    I was singing the praises of the Fuji Frontier system a few months ago while at
    a friend's place of employment (a mini-lab) and saying that his employer should
    look into it. The Noritsu repairman happened to be there at the time and he
    said that Noritsu was going to be releasing a new system that would entirely
    smoke the Fuji system...just wait a couple of months. Could this system that
    you are refering to be that one, I wonder.
    I'd try another system of the same type at some other establishment and see if
    the results are consistent....the calibration of their printer may be off...but
    there are so many variables involved between your equipment and their equipment
    that it begins to boggle my mind.
    When minilabs ran on film, there were factory provided negatives that served as
    reference for the operator to use to tune up the system...the legendary 18%
    neutral grey served as one target as did a grey scale and a portrait of a woman
    that served as a reference for a good flesh tone. Prints were produced at
    regular intervals and read on a color densitometer and then calculations were
    made to adjust the color and density on the printer which (in theory) would
    then make everybody's pictures look good. Of course, all cameras were slightly
    different, lenses coated or non coated and some made of plastic instead of
    glass...film that was long out of date or exposed to heat or radiation...you
    get the picture (no pun intended).
    The 18% neutral grey card should still be the standard by which color should be
    adjusted. Perhaps a phot of the card or a scan of it should be run through the
    system to serve as an indicator of whether or not you will be getting true
    color.
    I've also found that the Color Space that you are using in Photoshop can affect
    these Fuji (and, I assume) Noritsu printers...if it's Adobe RGB, the prints
    usually look way to yellow and red and the lab technicians rarely have enough
    training to be abe to understand this problem, let alone correct it. I find
    that I'm better off just sticking the memory card from the camera into the
    machine and printing from it rather than making any modifications in Photoshop.
    Best of luck...

    argon
     
    Argon3, Jul 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Bill Phillips

    Ron Baird Guest

    Greetings Argon,

    The feature in question is a great tool and a nice option to copy your
    pictures or create new ones from your digital files. The prints from the
    Kodak Picturemaker (the machine that provides a print directly to you at the
    bottom part of the machine) is a dye sublimation printer. The resulting
    prints have excellent quality and a similar life and features to silver
    based prints.

    We have also introduced a new Picturemaker II machine that will let you
    input your digital pictures to get a print from an enabled Digital Lab
    System (chemically processed Print). Both yield excellent pictures.
    Additional options will be made available for the Picturemaker II in the
    future.

    If you have any questions about the feature and or process, let me know.
    Or, you can go to our website that explains these features in greater
    detail.

    http://www.kodak.com/go/picturemaker

    Best Regards,

    Ron Baird
    Kodak





    "Argon3" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is this process indeed a dye-sub system or is it a tie in with the

    mini-lab
    > equipment like the Fuji Frontier system they have at Walmart, etc.?
    > I was singing the praises of the Fuji Frontier system a few months ago

    while at
    > a friend's place of employment (a mini-lab) and saying that his employer

    should
    > look into it. The Noritsu repairman happened to be there at the time and

    he
    > said that Noritsu was going to be releasing a new system that would

    entirely
    > smoke the Fuji system...just wait a couple of months. Could this system

    that
    > you are refering to be that one, I wonder.
    > I'd try another system of the same type at some other establishment and

    see if
    > the results are consistent....the calibration of their printer may be

    off...but
    > there are so many variables involved between your equipment and their

    equipment
    > that it begins to boggle my mind.
    > When minilabs ran on film, there were factory provided negatives that

    served as
    > reference for the operator to use to tune up the system...the legendary

    18%
    > neutral grey served as one target as did a grey scale and a portrait of a

    woman
    > that served as a reference for a good flesh tone. Prints were produced at
    > regular intervals and read on a color densitometer and then calculations

    were
    > made to adjust the color and density on the printer which (in theory)

    would
    > then make everybody's pictures look good. Of course, all cameras were

    slightly
    > different, lenses coated or non coated and some made of plastic instead of
    > glass...film that was long out of date or exposed to heat or

    radiation...you
    > get the picture (no pun intended).
    > The 18% neutral grey card should still be the standard by which color

    should be
    > adjusted. Perhaps a phot of the card or a scan of it should be run

    through the
    > system to serve as an indicator of whether or not you will be getting true
    > color.
    > I've also found that the Color Space that you are using in Photoshop can

    affect
    > these Fuji (and, I assume) Noritsu printers...if it's Adobe RGB, the

    prints
    > usually look way to yellow and red and the lab technicians rarely have

    enough
    > training to be abe to understand this problem, let alone correct it. I

    find
    > that I'm better off just sticking the memory card from the camera into the
    > machine and printing from it rather than making any modifications in

    Photoshop.
    > Best of luck...
    >
    > argon
     
    Ron Baird, Jul 31, 2003
    #3
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