Kodak cx6330

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Canongirly, Jul 13, 2004.

  1. Canongirly

    Canongirly Guest

    "Chris" <> wrote in message
    news:LKUIc.161$...
    > Hi all
    >
    > i bought the kodak camera and wow i
    > love it, just one thing puzzles me. whats all this pressing the shutter
    > half way mean?
    >
    > I am very new to taking pictures and i thought that you just pressed the
    > button all the way down. But do you have to press it half way first??
    >

    Depressing the shutter button halfway activates the light meter and
    autofocus. A full depress will also fire the shutter.
    Canongirly, Jul 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. Canongirly

    Chris Guest

    Hi all

    i bought the kodak camera and wow i
    love it, just one thing puzzles me. whats all this pressing the shutter
    half way mean?

    I am very new to taking pictures and i thought that you just pressed the
    button all the way down. But do you have to press it half way first??

    Probably a stupid question but i am learning

    Thanks for any help

    Chris
    Chris, Jul 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. Canongirly

    Ron Baird Guest

    Greetings Chris,



    Glad to hear you have ventured out into the world of Digital Photography.
    You are going to enjoy it.

    One of the things about digital cameras that is differ3ent from traditional
    cameras is the CCD (Charged Coupled Device) which captures the image when
    you take a picture. The digital image it captures is processed and stored in
    the memory of the camera or the little memory card. used to store images
    Since the CCD will retain the previous image, it has to be flushed clear
    before the next picture is taken. This happens in a split second, but you
    need to wait longer than with film cameras, so the shutter does not snap
    immediately when pressed. It works at a fast shutter speeds, i.e. 1/1700th
    second, but the preparation takes that brief flush of data.

    Also, the depressing of the shutter button half way allows the camera to
    focus on your subject and that the exposure will be correct. By depressing
    the shutter button, it locks in what you have chosen to accept for focus,
    and exposure. The camera will auto set it self to the ISO that is best for
    your situation as well.

    Let me review some picture taking tips. For example, when you are going to
    take pictures while holding the camera, a good stance is important in
    getting a good picture. Stand with your legs about two feet apart with your
    arms close to your sides. Hold the camera comfortably, but in a way that is
    not blocking the flash or the meter of the camera. If you are going to take
    a picture using the viewfinder, keep this stance and bring the camera gently
    to your forehead. View the image with both eyes open if you are using the
    viewfinder and compose the picture. When you are ready to snap the shutter,
    press the shutter half way to set the camera mechanics for exposure, as
    mentioned. When ready to capture the image, complete pressing the shutter
    release slowly, yet deliberately, avoiding any jerky motions. Note:
    remember, digital cameras take just a split second longer to capture the
    picture so keep your position for just a second longer than you would with a
    film camera. This will help you prevent blurring due to removing the camera
    from the picture taking stance too soon.

    If you are going to use the view-screen to preview your composition, use the
    same techniques as noted, but do not hold the camera to your forehead. It
    will be a bit more difficult to keep a good stance, as you will not have the
    option of steadying the camera against your forehead. So, to limit blur,
    lean against a wall, rest your elbows, or use some other object, if
    possible. Try to rest your arms on something in front of you. The object
    here, is to make sure you have the support to steady the camera and prevent
    camera movement during exposure.

    If the images are clear, and sharp, using the self timer, consider this
    process each time you take a picture. It will soon become second nature to
    you.

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird

    Eastman Kodak Company

    "Chris" <> wrote in message
    news:LKUIc.161$...
    > Hi all
    >
    > i bought the kodak camera and wow i
    > love it, just one thing puzzles me. whats all this pressing the shutter
    > half way mean?
    >
    > I am very new to taking pictures and i thought that you just pressed the
    > button all the way down. But do you have to press it half way first??
    >
    > Probably a stupid question but i am learning
    >
    > Thanks for any help
    >
    > Chris
    >
    >
    Ron Baird, Jul 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Canongirly

    Chris Guest

    thanks so much for all your help


    "Ron Baird" <> wrote in message
    news:cd1d3l$olh$...
    > Greetings Chris,
    >
    >
    >
    > Glad to hear you have ventured out into the world of Digital Photography.
    > You are going to enjoy it.
    >
    > One of the things about digital cameras that is differ3ent from

    traditional
    > cameras is the CCD (Charged Coupled Device) which captures the image when
    > you take a picture. The digital image it captures is processed and stored

    in
    > the memory of the camera or the little memory card. used to store images
    > Since the CCD will retain the previous image, it has to be flushed clear
    > before the next picture is taken. This happens in a split second, but you
    > need to wait longer than with film cameras, so the shutter does not snap
    > immediately when pressed. It works at a fast shutter speeds, i.e. 1/1700th
    > second, but the preparation takes that brief flush of data.
    >
    > Also, the depressing of the shutter button half way allows the camera to
    > focus on your subject and that the exposure will be correct. By depressing
    > the shutter button, it locks in what you have chosen to accept for focus,
    > and exposure. The camera will auto set it self to the ISO that is best for
    > your situation as well.
    >
    > Let me review some picture taking tips. For example, when you are going to
    > take pictures while holding the camera, a good stance is important in
    > getting a good picture. Stand with your legs about two feet apart with

    your
    > arms close to your sides. Hold the camera comfortably, but in a way that

    is
    > not blocking the flash or the meter of the camera. If you are going to

    take
    > a picture using the viewfinder, keep this stance and bring the camera

    gently
    > to your forehead. View the image with both eyes open if you are using the
    > viewfinder and compose the picture. When you are ready to snap the

    shutter,
    > press the shutter half way to set the camera mechanics for exposure, as
    > mentioned. When ready to capture the image, complete pressing the shutter
    > release slowly, yet deliberately, avoiding any jerky motions. Note:
    > remember, digital cameras take just a split second longer to capture the
    > picture so keep your position for just a second longer than you would with

    a
    > film camera. This will help you prevent blurring due to removing the

    camera
    > from the picture taking stance too soon.
    >
    > If you are going to use the view-screen to preview your composition, use

    the
    > same techniques as noted, but do not hold the camera to your forehead. It
    > will be a bit more difficult to keep a good stance, as you will not have

    the
    > option of steadying the camera against your forehead. So, to limit blur,
    > lean against a wall, rest your elbows, or use some other object, if
    > possible. Try to rest your arms on something in front of you. The object
    > here, is to make sure you have the support to steady the camera and

    prevent
    > camera movement during exposure.
    >
    > If the images are clear, and sharp, using the self timer, consider this
    > process each time you take a picture. It will soon become second nature to
    > you.
    >
    > Talk to you soon,
    >
    > Ron Baird
    >
    > Eastman Kodak Company
    >
    > "Chris" <> wrote in message
    > news:LKUIc.161$...
    > > Hi all
    > >
    > > i bought the kodak camera and wow i
    > > love it, just one thing puzzles me. whats all this pressing the shutter
    > > half way mean?
    > >
    > > I am very new to taking pictures and i thought that you just pressed the
    > > button all the way down. But do you have to press it half way first??
    > >
    > > Probably a stupid question but i am learning
    > >
    > > Thanks for any help
    > >
    > > Chris
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Chris, Jul 14, 2004
    #4
  5. Canongirly

    Terry D Guest

    Chris wrote:
    >>
    >> "Chris" <> wrote in message
    >> news:LKUIc.161$...
    >>> Hi all
    >>>
    >>> i bought the kodak camera and wow i
    >>> love it, just one thing puzzles me. whats all this pressing the
    >>> shutter half way mean?
    >>>
    >>> I am very new to taking pictures and i thought that you just
    >>> pressed the button all the way down. But do you have to press it
    >>> half way first??
    >>>
    >>> Probably a stupid question but i am learning
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for any help
    >>>
    >>> Chris


    I have a Kodak DX4330 and I understand that pressing the shutter button half
    way is supposed to lock the focus and exposure. However, if I move the
    camera to different lighting and/or different subject distance, holding the
    button half-way, the focus and exposure still readjust themselves. Should
    this be happening?

    Terry D.
    Terry D, Jul 14, 2004
    #5
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