Keyboard

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011.

  1. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both of
    my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not. And
    neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's keyboard
    with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper keyboarding
    skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own computer. Thanks!
     
    Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011
    #1
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  2. Julie Bove

    Paul Guest

    Julie Bove wrote:
    > Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both of
    > my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not. And
    > neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's keyboard
    > with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper keyboarding
    > skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own computer. Thanks!
    >


    Apparently, they're laser etching keycaps now, and placing ink in the
    trough created by the laser. I can see several companies offering
    such a feature.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126043

    I think I've had keycaps in the past, where they were molded, and
    then ink or plastic was added to the inlaid character in the keycap.
    Using a laser, means all the blank keys start the same, and the laser can
    make any character on demand. One reviewer notes that the character
    printed in the top of the keycap, isn't as crisp as older methods.

    On inspection, all my current keyboards are the "wear-out" kind, and
    my current keyboard, quite old, has significant wear on the
    "gaming keys" :) That's when you know you game too much :)

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 5, 2011
    #2
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  3. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:iuu141$m7u$...
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    >> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    >> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >> computer. Thanks!

    >
    > Apparently, they're laser etching keycaps now, and placing ink in the
    > trough created by the laser. I can see several companies offering
    > such a feature.
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126043
    >
    > I think I've had keycaps in the past, where they were molded, and
    > then ink or plastic was added to the inlaid character in the keycap.
    > Using a laser, means all the blank keys start the same, and the laser can
    > make any character on demand. One reviewer notes that the character
    > printed in the top of the keycap, isn't as crisp as older methods.
    >
    > On inspection, all my current keyboards are the "wear-out" kind, and
    > my current keyboard, quite old, has significant wear on the
    > "gaming keys" :) That's when you know you game too much :)
    >
    > Paul


    Thanks!
     
    Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011
    #3
  4. "Julie Bove" <> wrote in message
    news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    > Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    > of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    > And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    > keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    > keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    > computer. Thanks!
    >


    Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 5, 2011
    #4
  5. On 7/4/2011 10:40 PM, Paul wrote:
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off?
    >> Both of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine
    >> was not. And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a
    >> kid's keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach
    >> proper keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her
    >> own computer. Thanks!

    >
    > Apparently, they're laser etching keycaps now, and placing ink in the
    > trough created by the laser. I can see several companies offering
    > such a feature.
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823126043
    >
    > I think I've had keycaps in the past, where they were molded, and
    > then ink or plastic was added to the inlaid character in the keycap.
    > Using a laser, means all the blank keys start the same, and the laser can
    > make any character on demand. One reviewer notes that the character
    > printed in the top of the keycap, isn't as crisp as older methods.
    >
    > On inspection, all my current keyboards are the "wear-out" kind, and
    > my current keyboard, quite old, has significant wear on the
    > "gaming keys" :) That's when you know you game too much :)
    >
    > Paul
    >



    $80 for a wired keyboard?! Isn't that just a bit much?
     
    James D. Andrews, Jul 5, 2011
    #5
  6. On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    > "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    > news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    >> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    >> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >> computer. Thanks!
    >>

    >
    > Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >


    Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.

    But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and
    heavily abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard
    replacement is a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under
    $10, which is what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?

    I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    heavy use, so there must be something to them.
     
    James D. Andrews, Jul 5, 2011
    #6
  7. "James D. Andrews" <> wrote in message
    news:iuvam3$1ln$...
    > On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off?
    >>> Both
    >>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was
    >>> not.
    >>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>

    >>
    >> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>

    >
    > Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >
    > But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and heavily
    > abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard replacement is
    > a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under $10, which is
    > what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >
    > I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    > heavy use, so there must be something to them.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    I have the Logitch diNovo Edge that I really like, but the letters are worn
    off of the key caps. Letters are for sissies...
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jul 5, 2011
    #7
  8. Julie Bove

    Paul Guest

    James D. Andrews wrote:
    > On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off?
    >>> Both
    >>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was
    >>> not.
    >>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>

    >>
    >> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>

    >
    > Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >
    > But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and
    > heavily abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard
    > replacement is a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under
    > $10, which is what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >
    > I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    > heavy use, so there must be something to them.


    I referred to the Logitech one, as an example of a keyboard
    with laser etched and filled keycaps.

    If you pay $20 for a keyboard, the letters are just going to be printed
    on top.

    Some people pay more for a keyboard, to get the right "feel".
    For people like me, "hunt and peck" specialists who type with
    one finger on each hand, a $20 keyboard is fine. But people
    who type with some level of proficiency, sometimes look
    for the "typewriter" experience, and need the right kind
    of keyboard to get good accuracy and speed.

    There is a separate USENET group for discussions about
    keyboards, buckling springs and the like. Try
    alt.comp.periphs.keyboard as an example.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckling_spring

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 5, 2011
    #8
  9. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:iuv9tr$s9l$...
    >
    > "Julie Bove" <> wrote in message
    > news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    >> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    >> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >> computer. Thanks!
    >>

    >
    > Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.


    I did. I bought the one Paul suggested.
     
    Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011
    #9
  10. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "James D. Andrews" <> wrote in message
    news:iuvam3$1ln$...
    > On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off?
    >>> Both
    >>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was
    >>> not.
    >>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>

    >>
    >> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>

    >
    > Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >
    > But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and heavily
    > abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard replacement is
    > a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under $10, which is
    > what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >
    > I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    > heavy use, so there must be something to them.


    I've had two Dells and the letters wore off of both.
     
    Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011
    #10
  11. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:iuvcu7$hos$...
    > James D. Andrews wrote:
    >> On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >>> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off?
    >>>> Both
    >>>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was
    >>>> not.
    >>>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach
    >>>> proper
    >>>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >>
    >> But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and heavily
    >> abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard replacement
    >> is a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under $10, which is
    >> what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >>
    >> I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    >> heavy use, so there must be something to them.

    >
    > I referred to the Logitech one, as an example of a keyboard
    > with laser etched and filled keycaps.
    >
    > If you pay $20 for a keyboard, the letters are just going to be printed
    > on top.
    >
    > Some people pay more for a keyboard, to get the right "feel".
    > For people like me, "hunt and peck" specialists who type with
    > one finger on each hand, a $20 keyboard is fine. But people
    > who type with some level of proficiency, sometimes look
    > for the "typewriter" experience, and need the right kind
    > of keyboard to get good accuracy and speed.
    >
    > There is a separate USENET group for discussions about
    > keyboards, buckling springs and the like. Try
    > alt.comp.periphs.keyboard as an example.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckling_spring
    >
    > Paul
     
    Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011
    #11
  12. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:iuvcu7$hos$...
    > James D. Andrews wrote:
    >> On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >>> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off?
    >>>> Both
    >>>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was
    >>>> not.
    >>>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach
    >>>> proper
    >>>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >>
    >> But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and heavily
    >> abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard replacement
    >> is a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under $10, which is
    >> what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >>
    >> I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    >> heavy use, so there must be something to them.

    >
    > I referred to the Logitech one, as an example of a keyboard
    > with laser etched and filled keycaps.
    >
    > If you pay $20 for a keyboard, the letters are just going to be printed
    > on top.
    >
    > Some people pay more for a keyboard, to get the right "feel".
    > For people like me, "hunt and peck" specialists who type with
    > one finger on each hand, a $20 keyboard is fine. But people
    > who type with some level of proficiency, sometimes look
    > for the "typewriter" experience, and need the right kind
    > of keyboard to get good accuracy and speed.
    >
    > There is a separate USENET group for discussions about
    > keyboards, buckling springs and the like. Try
    > alt.comp.periphs.keyboard as an example.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckling_spring
    >
    > Paul


    Thanks!
     
    Julie Bove, Jul 5, 2011
    #12
  13. Julie Bove

    Kele Guest

    Another for the Dell. Looks like they are sticker letters, but this is an
    eight year old keyboard and the characters are perfect sill (SK-8110). The
    feel and positive press is still good as well.

    I will resist a wireless keyboard due to a slight delay... based on my
    experience with one keyboard at work a few years ago.


    "James D. Andrews" <> wrote
    > I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    > heavy use, so there must be something to them.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Kele, Jul 6, 2011
    #13
  14. Paul embroidered on the monitor :
    > James D. Andrews wrote:
    >> On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >>> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    >>>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    >>>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >>>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >>
    >> But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and heavily
    >> abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard replacement is
    >> a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under $10, which is
    >> what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >>
    >> I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    >> heavy use, so there must be something to them.

    >
    > I referred to the Logitech one, as an example of a keyboard
    > with laser etched and filled keycaps.
    >
    > If you pay $20 for a keyboard, the letters are just going to be printed
    > on top.
    >
    > Some people pay more for a keyboard, to get the right "feel".
    > For people like me, "hunt and peck" specialists who type with
    > one finger on each hand, a $20 keyboard is fine. But people
    > who type with some level of proficiency, sometimes look
    > for the "typewriter" experience, and need the right kind
    > of keyboard to get good accuracy and speed.
    >
    > There is a separate USENET group for discussions about
    > keyboards, buckling springs and the like. Try
    > alt.comp.periphs.keyboard as an example.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckling_spring
    >
    > Paul


    --
    -There are some who call me...
    Jim


    "What do you mean?" he said. "Do you wish me a good morning, or mean
    that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel
    good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?"
    -Gandalf, after Bilbo Baggins says "Good Morning"
     
    James D Andrews, Jul 6, 2011
    #14
  15. Paul snuck on to your hard drive to scribble:
    > James D. Andrews wrote:
    >> On 7/5/2011 10:17 AM, Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>> "Julie Bove"<> wrote in message
    >>> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    >>>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    >>>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >>>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Not the Logitech one Paul refs from Newegg.
    >>
    >> But seriously, considering it's one of the most heavily used (and heavily
    >> abused) items in a computer-oriented home,eventual keyboard replacement is
    >> a given. And, as you pointed out, you can get one under $10, which is
    >> what, 3-4 cups of coffee nowadays?
    >>
    >> I have a Dell keyboard, as well, and the letters are fine after years of
    >> heavy use, so there must be something to them.

    >
    > I referred to the Logitech one, as an example of a keyboard
    > with laser etched and filled keycaps.
    >
    > If you pay $20 for a keyboard, the letters are just going to be printed
    > on top.
    >
    > Some people pay more for a keyboard, to get the right "feel".
    > For people like me, "hunt and peck" specialists who type with
    > one finger on each hand, a $20 keyboard is fine. But people
    > who type with some level of proficiency, sometimes look
    > for the "typewriter" experience, and need the right kind
    > of keyboard to get good accuracy and speed.
    >
    > There is a separate USENET group for discussions about
    > keyboards, buckling springs and the like. Try
    > alt.comp.periphs.keyboard as an example.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckling_spring
    >
    > Paul


    I know what you meant, Paul. I was just funning with you. My only
    point was that the price seemed a bit extreme. Sorry if it sounded
    mean.

    As for me, I've been a touch typist for over 30 years, a necessity to
    my writing and former military career, and I'm at the keyboard all day
    everyday. I've never personally had the need for super unique
    keyboards.

    I actually like the old clickity clacks, probably since I learned to
    type on an old Royal typewriter, spent most of my pre-computer time on
    the old IBM Selectrics, used the KSR teletypes in the military, and so
    on before jumping into the personal computer age. I do use a wrist pad
    nowadays as the strength in my hands slowly fades.

    I hate laptop keyboards and normal keyboards that emulate them. I'm
    curious what are your thoughts on them?

    --
    -There are some who call me...
    Jim


    It's a dangerous business, going out your door. You step onto the road,
    and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be
    swept off to.
    -Samwise Gamgee quoting Bilbo Baggins, edited
     
    James D Andrews, Jul 6, 2011
    #15
  16. Julie Bove snuck on to your hard drive to scribble:
    > "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    > news:iuv9tr$s9l$...
    >>
    >> "Julie Bove" <> wrote in message
    >> news:iutqg6$ngj$...
    >>> Does anyone know of a keyboard where the letters will not wear off? Both
    >>> of my parents have Dell keyboards and theirs are fine. But mine was not.
    >>> And neither have any of the replacements. I currently have a kid's
    >>> keyboard with the keys in various colors. It's supposed to teach proper
    >>> keyboarding skills but daughter no longer uses it. She has her own
    >>> computer. Thanks!
    >>>

    >>
    >> Keyboards are cheap. Go buy one.

    >
    > I did. I bought the one Paul suggested.


    Techno-geeks of the world unite! :)

    Seriously, though, if you don't have one, it's a good idea to get a
    spare keyboard, even if it's just a cheap one, as a backup.

    Or if you're like me and have multiple computers in the room and don't
    like to swap out keyboards every time you're working on a different
    one.

    If you do, then in the words of Emily Litella, "never mind."

    --
    -There are some who call me...
    Jim


    "Distrust any enterprise that requires new clothes."
    - Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)
     
    James D Andrews, Jul 6, 2011
    #16
  17. Julie Bove

    Paul Guest

    James D Andrews wrote:

    >
    > I hate laptop keyboards and normal keyboards that emulate them. I'm
    > curious what are your thoughts on them?


    Yes, the keyboard on my laptop (obtained late last year) is
    dreadful. No key travel, flat response. I don't even think it
    has the "dots" on the home keys.

    And to top it off, the space bar is already acting up. And
    I doubt I've typed more than a couple pages on that machine.
    One of the two springs in the space bar is dead, requiring
    extra efforts to get a space typed.

    I also don't have kind words, for the last Macintosh keyboard
    I got (with a computer). White keys with black lettering,
    is a glare nightmare (the lettering is done with fine lines
    rather than thick lines). You really need to be a touch typist
    with that one, because actually looking at the keys isn't that
    easy.

    In terms of nice keyboards from a construction standpoint,
    the IBM mainframe keyboards, the one with the steel shell
    and full key travel. Now, those could take abuse. The keyboard
    also featured the "key lock" feature. When the mainframe was
    crashing (load factor >55), the mainframe would send some kind
    of signal to all the timeshared terminals. And the keyboard had
    a mechanical feature, where the keys all "locked" and would
    no longer travel. You couldn't enter any input then. It was
    definitely a way to get the users attention. You could pound
    on the keyboard all you wanted, when it locked, and no key
    could possibly register. Lots of steel, very heavy. The
    keyboard was bound to outlast the mainframe generation :)

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 6, 2011
    #17
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