keeping track

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ami, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. Ami

    Ami Guest

    Hi,

    First, although I should have posted in my original thread, thanks everyone
    who responded to my canon rebel vs. 30D question. I have made my decision,
    but would like to wait to let you know what I've decided until I can post my
    first shots. Let me just hint that all your "good glass" comments got me
    into heap big trouble, but I think I am going to be very happy with my
    choice. This is a great board with great people! Thanks again!



    Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be me)
    take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group. They
    somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed etc. they
    used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each setting? I
    can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every picture they
    take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the optimal exposure
    was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera display the info when
    you review the picture. That would be so great. How do you guys keep
    track?


    Ami
    Ami, Jul 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 08:27:43 -0400, Ami <> wrote:
    > Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    > document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    > properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be me)
    > take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group. They
    > somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed etc. they
    > used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each setting? I
    > can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every picture they
    > take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the optimal exposure
    > was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera display the info when
    > you review the picture. That would be so great. How do you guys keep
    > track?


    Virtually all cameras these days do save that sort of information, in
    what are called EXIF fields. This information is stored in the same file
    as your image, and many image viewer/editor programs can read them.
    There are also plenty of standalone programs that do nothing but pull
    out EXIF information from images and display the information for you to
    look at. You get the shutter speed, lens aperture, current focal length
    of the lens, etc. etc.

    That leaves you the problem of keeping track of the subjects of your
    photo; even the best camera can't tell the difference between a shot of
    Great Uncle Fred vs. a picture of sunrise over the Grand Canyon.

    -dms
    Daniel Silevitch, Jul 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. Ami

    Roy G Guest

    "Ami" <> wrote in message news:44ad01c1$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > First, although I should have posted in my original thread, thanks
    > everyone who responded to my canon rebel vs. 30D question. I have made my
    > decision, but would like to wait to let you know what I've decided until I
    > can post my first shots. Let me just hint that all your "good glass"
    > comments got me into heap big trouble, but I think I am going to be very
    > happy with my choice. This is a great board with great people! Thanks
    > again!
    >
    >
    >
    > Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    > document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    > properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be
    > me) take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group. They
    > somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed etc.
    > they used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each
    > setting? I can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every
    > picture they take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the
    > optimal exposure was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera
    > display the info when you review the picture. That would be so great.
    > How do you guys keep track?
    >
    >
    > Ami
    >
    >

    Hi

    Whichever you have chosen, you will be glad to know that the Camera will
    record all the info you could require, plus a load you would never need, all
    totally automatically. it is known as EXIF data.

    Roy G
    Roy G, Jul 6, 2006
    #3
  4. Ami

    Ami Guest

    "Daniel Silevitch" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 08:27:43 -0400, Ami <> wrote:
    >> Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    >> document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    >> properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be
    >> me)
    >> take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group. They
    >> somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed etc.
    >> they
    >> used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each setting? I
    >> can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every picture they
    >> take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the optimal
    >> exposure
    >> was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera display the info
    >> when
    >> you review the picture. That would be so great. How do you guys keep
    >> track?

    >
    > Virtually all cameras these days do save that sort of information, in
    > what are called EXIF fields. This information is stored in the same file
    > as your image, and many image viewer/editor programs can read them.
    > There are also plenty of standalone programs that do nothing but pull
    > out EXIF information from images and display the information for you to
    > look at. You get the shutter speed, lens aperture, current focal length
    > of the lens, etc. etc.
    >
    > That leaves you the problem of keeping track of the subjects of your
    > photo; even the best camera can't tell the difference between a shot of
    > Great Uncle Fred vs. a picture of sunrise over the Grand Canyon.
    >
    > -dms


    Oh, that's what the EXIF stands for in the pbase entries!

    Thanks! (and Yay!)
    Ami, Jul 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Ami

    Ami Guest

    "Roy G" <> wrote in message
    news:Ax7rg.15332$...
    > "Ami" <> wrote in message
    > news:44ad01c1$...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> First, although I should have posted in my original thread, thanks
    >> everyone who responded to my canon rebel vs. 30D question. I have made my
    >> decision, but would like to wait to let you know what I've decided until
    >> I can post my first shots. Let me just hint that all your "good glass"
    >> comments got me into heap big trouble, but I think I am going to be very
    >> happy with my choice. This is a great board with great people! Thanks
    >> again!
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    >> document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    >> properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be
    >> me) take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group.
    >> They somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed
    >> etc. they used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each
    >> setting? I can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every
    >> picture they take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the
    >> optimal exposure was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera
    >> display the info when you review the picture. That would be so great.
    >> How do you guys keep track?
    >>
    >>
    >> Ami
    >>
    >>

    > Hi
    >
    > Whichever you have chosen, you will be glad to know that the Camera will
    > record all the info you could require, plus a load you would never need,
    > all totally automatically. it is known as EXIF data.
    >
    > Roy G
    >

    Thanks!

    Double Yay!
    Ami, Jul 6, 2006
    #5
  6. In article <44ad01c1$>, Ami <> wrote:

    > Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    > document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    > properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be me)
    > take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group. They
    > somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed etc. they
    > used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each setting? I
    > can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every picture they
    > take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the optimal exposure
    > was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera display the info when
    > you review the picture. That would be so great. How do you guys keep
    > track?


    Yes, EXIF information is saved with the image. But I can't see how that
    information is useful. Even back in the old film days, magazines would
    print the settings that photos were taken at. It' s useless unless you
    were standing right next to the guy when he took it.
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 6, 2006
    #6
  7. Ami

    Scott W Guest

    Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    > Yes, EXIF information is saved with the image. But I can't see how that
    > information is useful. Even back in the old film days, magazines would
    > print the settings that photos were taken at. It' s useless unless you
    > were standing right next to the guy when he took it.


    Useless is it?
    Seems to me someone starting out in photography might benifit from
    reviewing the settings that a given shot was taken at, to get a feel
    for DOF at different fl and f/numbers as an example.

    It also helps to give a better idea about just how slow a shutter speed
    can be used.

    And if you are changing the ISO from shot to shot it is very nice to
    know what setting was used.

    In some cases just knowing what lens was used is helpful.

    Scott
    Scott W, Jul 6, 2006
    #7
  8. Ami

    Guest

    Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    > In article <44ad01c1$>, Ami <> wrote:
    >
    > > Here's a potentially stupid question for you. Do these digital cameras
    > > document what the settings were for each picture (like clicking on
    > > properties)? From what I have seen an heard online, people (soon to be me)
    > > take hundreds of pictures and get some winners out of the group. They
    > > somehow have kept track of what f/stop, exposure and shutter speed etc. they
    > > used for each individual picture. Are they writing down each setting? I
    > > can't imagine they are writing down the settings for every picture they
    > > take- and what about bracketing? How do you know what the optimal exposure
    > > was if the camera did it for you? Or does the camera display the info when
    > > you review the picture. That would be so great. How do you guys keep
    > > track?

    >
    > Yes, EXIF information is saved with the image. But I can't see how that
    > information is useful. Even back in the old film days, magazines would
    > print the settings that photos were taken at. It' s useless unless you
    > were standing right next to the guy when he took it.


    For me personally it will be very useful. If I manage to take a good
    picture of a bear in my yard at 6:30 in the morning, it would be nice
    to know what settings it was taken at, so I can grab my camera and run
    out there in the future having a clue as to how to get another good
    shot. Also for my arena shots, once I have an idea of the settings that
    work in that light and with the speed of the action, I'll have a better
    chance of getting consistant results. I will be making test shots in
    various light situations, so it will be nice not to have to write down
    everything.


    Ami
    , Jul 7, 2006
    #8
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