KB v Kb

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Cliff, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. Cliff

    Cliff Guest

    Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
    apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    Is this now the accepted usage?
    I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
     
    Cliff, Feb 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. Cliff

    thing Guest

    Cliff wrote:
    > Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    > I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    > Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    > I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
    > apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    > Is this now the accepted usage?
    > I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
    >
    >



    kb = kilobit, kB = kilobyte. Networks usually work in kb or Mb.

    eg 100Mbit/sec is typical LAN.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thing, Feb 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. thing wrote:
    >> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and
    >> lots of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >> Is this now the accepted usage?


    > kb = kilobit, kB = kilobyte. Networks usually work in kb or Mb.
    > eg 100Mbit/sec is typical LAN.


    in saying that, personally I almost always use kbit and kbyte in
    situations where it could be either... better that that explain it all
    again in another post/email/whatever.
     
    Dave - dave.net.nz, Feb 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Cliff

    Rider Guest

    "Cliff" <> wrote in message
    news:dXsUd.5023$...
    > Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    > I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    > Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    > I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    > of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    > Is this now the accepted usage?
    > I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
    >
    >


    Keyboard?

    :p
     
    Rider, Feb 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Cliff

    Allistar Guest

    Cliff wrote:

    > Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    > I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    > Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    > I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    > of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    > Is this now the accepted usage?
    > I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.


    And to start the trollfest:

    Kb (kilobit) is technically 1000 bits.
    Kib (kibibit) is technically 1024 bits.

    When talking about computer storage most people use Kb when they mean Kib. I
    do as well, just what I'm used to I suppose.

    Companies use this difference (which is not insignificant) when selling
    hard-drives to make the number appear larger. I.e. they say 80Gb when they
    mean Gb, and most of us would assume they mean Gib.

    Allistar.
     
    Allistar, Feb 27, 2005
    #5
  6. On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 01:08:50 +0000, Bruce Sinclair wrote:

    > In article <d6tUd.5028$>, "Rider" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>"Cliff" <> wrote in message
    >>news:dXsUd.5023$...
    >>> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >>> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >>> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >>> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    >>> of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >>> Is this now the accepted usage?
    >>> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.

    >>
    >>Keyboard?

    >
    > k/b :)
    >
    > I would suggest that you use k rather than K. k means 1000 ... and I have no
    > idea what K means.
    >
    > Bruce

    degrees Kelvin?
    or Potassium?
    --

    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked
     
    Shane (aka froggy), Feb 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Cliff

    Caught Guest

    "Allistar" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Cliff wrote:
    >
    >> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    >> of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >> Is this now the accepted usage?
    >> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.

    >
    > And to start the trollfest:
    >
    > Kb (kilobit) is technically 1000 bits.
    > Kib (kibibit) is technically 1024 bits.
    >
    > When talking about computer storage most people use Kb when they mean Kib.
    > I
    > do as well, just what I'm used to I suppose.
    >
    > Companies use this difference (which is not insignificant) when selling
    > hard-drives to make the number appear larger. I.e. they say 80Gb when they
    > mean Gb, and most of us would assume they mean Gib.
    >
    > Allistar.


    Scientifically

    lower case k ==> is kilo, that is x 1000
    upper case K ==> Kelvin, which is a unit of temperature

    as for lower case b or upper case B ......... !!!!!!! ???????

    So I'm equally confused :-(
     
    Caught, Feb 28, 2005
    #7
  8. In article <d6tUd.5028$>, "Rider" <> wrote:
    >
    >"Cliff" <> wrote in message
    >news:dXsUd.5023$...
    >> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    >> of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >> Is this now the accepted usage?
    >> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.

    >
    >Keyboard?


    k/b :)

    I would suggest that you use k rather than K. k means 1000 ... and I have no
    idea what K means.

    Bruce


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to
    think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone´s fault.
    If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, I´m one of Us. I must be.
    I´ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks
    of themselves as one of Them. We´re always one of Us. It´s Them that do
    the bad things. <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Feb 28, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <>, "Shane (aka froggy)" <> wrote:
    >On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 01:08:50 +0000, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >> In article <d6tUd.5028$>, "Rider"

    > <> wrote:
    >>>"Cliff" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:dXsUd.5023$...
    >>>> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >>>> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >>>> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >>>> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    >>>> of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >>>> Is this now the accepted usage?
    >>>> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
    >>>
    >>>Keyboard?

    >>
    >> k/b :)
    >>
    >> I would suggest that you use k rather than K. k means 1000 ... and I have no
    >> idea what K means.


    > degrees Kelvin?


    That would have a little degree sign by it :)

    >or Potassium?


    True. I missed that amongst the context :)


    Bruce


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to
    think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone´s fault.
    If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, I´m one of Us. I must be.
    I´ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks
    of themselves as one of Them. We´re always one of Us. It´s Them that do
    the bad things. <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Feb 28, 2005
    #9
  10. Cliff

    Arkwright Guest

    The convention is that an uppercase letter is used if the unit is named
    after a person (eg K - Kelvin; W - Watt) otherwise it is lower case (eg b -
    bit: s - second, etc).

    The first letters are set by International conventions (eg m - milli, k
    kilo, M - mega, G - Giga, etc)

    Cheers
     
    Arkwright, Feb 28, 2005
    #10
  11. In article <>, "Arkwright" <> wrote:
    >The convention is that an uppercase letter is used if the unit is named
    >after a person (eg K - Kelvin; W - Watt) otherwise it is lower case (eg b -
    >bit: s - second, etc).
    >
    >The first letters are set by International conventions (eg m - milli, k
    >kilo, M - mega, G - Giga, etc)


    Indeed. A good basic site on SI units is ...
    www.iupac.org/reports/1993/homann/base1.html and related links.

    Bruce


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to
    think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone´s fault.
    If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, I´m one of Us. I must be.
    I´ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks
    of themselves as one of Them. We´re always one of Us. It´s Them that do
    the bad things. <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Feb 28, 2005
    #11
  12. Cliff

    MarkH Guest

    "Shane (aka froggy)" <> wrote in
    news:p:

    > On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 01:08:50 +0000, Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >> I would suggest that you use k rather than K. k means 1000 ... and I
    >> have no idea what K means.
    >>

    > degrees Kelvin?
    > or Potassium?


    There is no such thing as degrees Kelvin!



    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 20-Jan-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Feb 28, 2005
    #12
  13. On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 13:12:44 +1300, "Caught" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Allistar" <> wrote in message news:...
    >> Cliff wrote:
    >>
    >>> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >>> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >>> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >>> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
    >>> of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >>> Is this now the accepted usage?
    >>> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.

    >>
    >> And to start the trollfest:
    >>
    >> Kb (kilobit) is technically 1000 bits.
    >> Kib (kibibit) is technically 1024 bits.
    >>
    >> When talking about computer storage most people use Kb when they mean Kib.
    >> I
    >> do as well, just what I'm used to I suppose.
    >>
    >> Companies use this difference (which is not insignificant) when selling
    >> hard-drives to make the number appear larger. I.e. they say 80Gb when they
    >> mean Gb, and most of us would assume they mean Gib.
    >>
    >> Allistar.

    >
    >Scientifically
    >
    >lower case k ==> is kilo, that is x 1000
    >upper case K ==> Kelvin, which is a unit of temperature
    >
    >as for lower case b or upper case B ......... !!!!!!! ???????
    >
    >So I'm equally confused :-(
    >


    To clarify:

    b is a bit
    B is a byte

    k is kilo (one thousand)
    Ki is kibi (one thousand binary)
    M is mega (one million)
    Mi is mibi (one million binary)
    G is giga (one thousand million)
    Gi is gibi (one thousand million binary)
    etc...

    Therefore:

    1 kb is 1000 bits, a kilobit
    1 kB is 1000 bytes, a kilobyte
    1 Kib is 1024 bits, a kibibit OR kilo binary bit
    1 KiB is 1024 bytes, a kibibyte OR kilo binary byte
    etc...

    Note: minuscule 'k' is the only exception (sort of) to the capital
    rule (presumably because of the aforementioned reason). Also noted
    previously, majuscule 'B' is in disputed use as it stands for the SI
    measurement 'Bel' (see: decibel).

    These measurements were created by the International Electrotechnical
    Commission ( http://www.iec.ch/ ).
     
    Thomas Hosseini, Feb 28, 2005
    #13
  14. Cliff

    MarkH Guest

    z (Bruce Sinclair) wrote in
    news:motUd.5035$:

    > In article <>, "Shane (aka
    > froggy)" <> wrote:
    >
    >> degrees Kelvin?

    >
    > That would have a little degree sign by it :)
    >


    No degree sign, because there is no such thing as degrees Kelvin!

    313 Kelvin is a temperature
    20 degrees Celsius is a temperature


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 20-Jan-05)
    "There are 10 types of people, those that
    understand binary and those that don't"
     
    MarkH, Feb 28, 2005
    #14
  15. Cliff

    Bruce Knox Guest

    On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 12:47:13 +1300, thing <> wrote:

    >Cliff wrote:
    >> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
    >> apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >> Is this now the accepted usage?
    >> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >kb = kilobit, kB = kilobyte. Networks usually work in kb or Mb.
    >
    >eg 100Mbit/sec is typical LAN.
    >
    >regards
    >
    >Thing

    I have to disagree with your lower case k. Any modifier about a unit
    should be a capital and below a unit lower case. eg M=mega m=milli.

    Bruce.
     
    Bruce Knox, Feb 28, 2005
    #15
  16. Cliff

    David Preece Guest

    Cliff wrote:
    > I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.


    Yup.

    > lots of
    > apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.


    I know.

    > Is this now the accepted usage?


    No, not really. The trick is to look to see if it's a per-second figure,
    in which case it's almost always kilobits and the reverse generally applies.

    You may now get started on the difference between a gigabyte and 1 with
    nine zeroes :)

    Dave
     
    David Preece, Feb 28, 2005
    #16
  17. Cliff

    AD. Guest

    On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 18:34:29 +1300, Bruce Knox wrote:

    > I have to disagree with your lower case k. Any modifier about a unit
    > should be a capital and below a unit lower case. eg M=mega m=milli.


    Huh? kilo has always been lowercased.

    km, kg etc

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Feb 28, 2005
    #17
  18. In <dXsUd.5023$> Cliff wrote:
    > Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    > I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    > Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    > I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and
    > lots of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes. Is this now the
    > accepted usage? I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like
    > to know.


    Plenty of replies already, but I'll add one more.

    Traditionally b for bit and B for byte, but alas a lot of people are
    ignorant of this tradition. And it is only tradition as these units and
    abbreviations have never been officially adopted by any standards body
    as far as know.

    However [name of standards group that I can't remember] recommends using
    'bit' as an abbreviation for bits to avoid just this problem. So 56
    kilobits per second is 56kbit/s, and 33 megabytes per second is 33MB/s.
    Note that it's 'bit' for bit or bits.

    --
    Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
    http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
    ________________________________________________________________________
    No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

    Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
     
    Roger Johnstone, Feb 28, 2005
    #18
  19. In article <dXsUd.5023$>, "Cliff" <> wrote:
    >Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
    >I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
    >Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
    >I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
    >apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
    >Is this now the accepted usage?
    >I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
    >

    B (uppercase) refers to bytes. b (lowercase) refers to bits.
    Apparently it's acceptable to use Gb and Tb to refer to gigabytes and
    terabytes, respectively, but as we now move to network speeds that are
    measured in Gb/s it seems very stupid.
    Certainly for capacity measurements of K and M, the upper- and
    lowercase distinction matters.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Feb 28, 2005
    #19
  20. In article <>, Bruce Knox <> wrote:
    >On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 12:47:13 +1300, thing <> wrote:

    *SNIP*
    >I have to disagree with your lower case k. Any modifier about a unit
    >should be a capital and below a unit lower case. eg M=mega m=milli.
    >

    However, technically, K is Kelvin. Though suffixing it with a B or b
    makes it fairly clear that one is not talking about absolute
    temperatures.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Feb 28, 2005
    #20
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