Just passed 70-229

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by Guy Cox, Jul 3, 2003.

  1. Guy Cox

    Guy Cox Guest

    It was pretty though. Lots of rote memorization.

    The one question on OpenXML had NO right answer.

    The scenario on deadlocks had an impossible situation --
    I don't see how a transaction can deadlock if there's only one resource
    involved.
    (Anyone care to comment).


    Nothing on Spindle tuning.
    Nothing on FreeText
    Nothing on Backup/Restore.
    Nothing on the Profiler
    Some really arcane questions on User Defined DB roles and Permission Chains.
    Serveral Questions on Execution Plans and indices ( know what all the items
    in the mouse over mean).

    The DB design questions were trivial.

    44 Questions and 1:54 minutes ( I think I got the time right).

    As always there were several answers that took up the entire screen making
    it hard to compare them and then to top it off the exam software doesn't
    recognize a scroll mouse...

    Guy
     
    Guy Cox, Jul 3, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Congrats on passing! It is not an easy exam.

    > The scenario on deadlocks had an impossible situation --
    > I don't see how a transaction can deadlock if there's only one resource
    > involved.
    > (Anyone care to comment).


    Perhaps a very poorly written application can do this.

    I have to pass this exam in the future. Thanks for the tips.
    Davin Mickelson

    "Guy Cox" <gcoxjr-$nospam$> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It was pretty though. Lots of rote memorization.
    >
    > The one question on OpenXML had NO right answer.
    >
    > The scenario on deadlocks had an impossible situation --
    > I don't see how a transaction can deadlock if there's only one resource
    > involved.
    > (Anyone care to comment).
    >
    >
    > Nothing on Spindle tuning.
    > Nothing on FreeText
    > Nothing on Backup/Restore.
    > Nothing on the Profiler
    > Some really arcane questions on User Defined DB roles and Permission

    Chains.
    > Serveral Questions on Execution Plans and indices ( know what all the

    items
    > in the mouse over mean).
    >
    > The DB design questions were trivial.
    >
    > 44 Questions and 1:54 minutes ( I think I got the time right).
    >
    > As always there were several answers that took up the entire screen making
    > it hard to compare them and then to top it off the exam software doesn't
    > recognize a scroll mouse...
    >
    > Guy
    >
    >
    >
     
    Davin Mickelson, Jul 3, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guy Cox

    Tim Guest

    "Guy Cox" <gcoxjr-$nospam$> wrote in message
    news:...

    > The scenario on deadlocks had an impossible situation --
    > I don't see how a transaction can deadlock if there's only one resource
    > involved.
    > (Anyone care to comment).


    Sure it can. Separate objects are easier to understand, but SQL locks are
    frequently going to be at smaller granularity than an entire table (down to
    individual row locks). So instead of thinking of "object A" and "object B"
    in a simple deadlock scenario as tables, think of them as rows within one
    table.
     
    Tim, Jul 3, 2003
    #3
  4. Guy Cox

    Guy Cox Guest

    Agree on the granularity issue.. But in this case there was a single stored
    proc that had a table lock hint.
    Dead locks are caused when Process A is wating on a resource that Process B
    has locked and Process B is waiting on a resource that Process A has locked.
    In this scenario there was only a single resource (a table). As soon as
    process A runs and obtains the table lock Process B is placed in the queue
    waiting on the resource lock to be released - it has no resources that
    Process A would need to complete.
    There is only lock escalation, not de-escalation so the granularity of the
    lock is going to stay at the table level.
    If the locking granularity specified in SP had been specified at something
    less than the table - and if the query plan had added a table lock, the firt
    table would obtain the lock on the entire table. If the query plan leaves
    the lock at the row level, the second process requesting the table lock
    would still be placed into the queue waiting for the lock on the single
    row/rows that had been obtained by process A. Remember this was the same
    stored proc being run twice. I still content it's a bad question.

    Guy

    "Tim" <spammers@begone> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Guy Cox" <gcoxjr-$nospam$> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    > > The scenario on deadlocks had an impossible situation --
    > > I don't see how a transaction can deadlock if there's only one resource
    > > involved.
    > > (Anyone care to comment).

    >
    > Sure it can. Separate objects are easier to understand, but SQL locks are
    > frequently going to be at smaller granularity than an entire table (down

    to
    > individual row locks). So instead of thinking of "object A" and "object B"
    > in a simple deadlock scenario as tables, think of them as rows within one
    > table.
    >
    >
     
    Guy Cox, Jul 7, 2003
    #4
  5. Guy Cox

    Paisleyskye Guest

    Congrats on the pass! Thanks for the info.
    --
    Tracey J. Rosenblath
    www.icertify.net

    "Guy Cox" <gcoxjr-$nospam$> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It was pretty though. Lots of rote memorization.
    >
    > The one question on OpenXML had NO right answer.
    >
    > The scenario on deadlocks had an impossible situation --
    > I don't see how a transaction can deadlock if there's only one resource
    > involved.
    > (Anyone care to comment).
    >
    >
    > Nothing on Spindle tuning.
    > Nothing on FreeText
    > Nothing on Backup/Restore.
    > Nothing on the Profiler
    > Some really arcane questions on User Defined DB roles and Permission

    Chains.
    > Serveral Questions on Execution Plans and indices ( know what all the

    items
    > in the mouse over mean).
    >
    > The DB design questions were trivial.
    >
    > 44 Questions and 1:54 minutes ( I think I got the time right).
    >
    > As always there were several answers that took up the entire screen making
    > it hard to compare them and then to top it off the exam software doesn't
    > recognize a scroll mouse...
    >
    > Guy
    >
    >
    >
     
    Paisleyskye, Aug 3, 2003
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Michael Lierheimer

    Just passed 70-229 to became an MCSD .NET

    Michael Lierheimer, Sep 30, 2003, in forum: MCSD
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    501
    Michae Lierheimer
    Oct 2, 2003
  2. Renu Goyal
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    596
  3. Hugo Sousa
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    3,295
    catwalker63
    Apr 2, 2005
  4. David
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    664
    Joseph Bittman MVP MCSD
    Dec 16, 2005
  5. Roel
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    376
    Trika Harms zum Spreckel (MSFT)
    Nov 1, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page