Just out of curiosity

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Tester, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. Tester

    Tester Guest

    Why are some of the files found in /etc in Unix found in
    C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc in XP?

    They have nothing whatsoever to do with drivers.

    In particular I'm looking at /etc/hosts which alows you to put in
    lines like

    102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com

    and then access http://rhino.acme.com/whatever.html

    even though there's no such domain defined on the internet.


    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Tester, Dec 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. Tester

    Vanguard Guest

    "Tester" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Why are some of the files found in /etc in Unix found in
    > C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc in XP?


    Because UNIX is UNIX and Windows is Windows. Because Word and
    WordPerfect both have File menues in their toolbar, you figure they
    must have identical entries? They are different programs.

    > They have nothing whatsoever to do with drivers.


    Yeah, so what? Just because you wear tighty whities doesn't command
    the rest of us to do so. As you already pointed out, they are
    DIFFERENT operating systems. Duh. So, in UNIX, what does the
    /etc/issue file have to do with drivers? Absolutely NOTHING as it is
    the welcome message when you login under UNIX. Guess you'll have to
    reread that "UNIX for Dummies" book or actually do some more
    self-education on UNIX.

    > In particular I'm looking at /etc/hosts which alows you to put in
    > lines like
    >
    > 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com
    >
    > and then access http://rhino.acme.com/whatever.html
    >
    > even though there's no such domain defined on the internet.


    So what? There is no requirement the domain be registered or defined
    anywhere. You haven't a clue what the hosts file is for, do you? The
    hosts file is a local lookup. Wherever you use the IP name results in
    that local lookup to whatever IP address was specified. You could
    have:

    209.130.140.202 ignorant.OSuser.isMe

    and entering http://ignorant.OSuser.isMe would take you to
    www.eidosgames.com (their IP name for their 209.130.140.202 IP
    address). Maybe those "UNIX for Dummies" and "Windows for Dummies"
    books omitted educating their readers on just what is the hosts file.
    Have a read at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosts_file
    Vanguard, Dec 12, 2006
    #2
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  3. Tester

    why? Guest

    On Tue, 12 Dec 2006 06:51:28 -0500, Tester wrote:

    >Why are some of the files found in /etc in Unix found in
    >C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc in XP?
    >
    >They have nothing whatsoever to do with drivers.


    Ask Microsoft, you will note there are several UNIX type things in
    Windows. Like /etc/hosts (UNIX) , where MS simply added system32\drivers
    in front. The other was the vertical adjustment bar in NT3/4 user
    manager, just like several Unix systems. IIRC bits of the TCP/IP were
    from BSD, there were quite a few things but it's been years since I had
    a list. The internal references to devices like hardisks was another,
    \Device\HardDisk0\Partition1, very similar to /dev/rdsk/
    <controller><scsi id><slice>

    You didn't even need to have a SCSI device, that's the convention used.


    boot.ini was ARC, RISC PC naming conventions.

    It would be drivers anyway, related to TCP/IP driver.

    >In particular I'm looking at /etc/hosts which alows you to put in
    >lines like
    >
    >102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com


    That would be the commented out example
    # For example:
    #
    # 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server

    >and then access http://rhino.acme.com/whatever.html


    Where are you going with this?

    >even though there's no such domain defined on the internet.


    That's good for an example, so it doesn't block a real domain you may
    want to connect to.

    Me
    why?, Dec 12, 2006
    #3
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