job search strategies

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by gogona, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. gogona

    gogona Guest

    I had an Internet cafe-LAN gaming center in Greece for about 3 years but had
    to leave that country and move to the USA for personal reasons. Business was
    good and I just admired what I was doing.

    So couple of months ago, when I came to this country, I was full of hopes to
    find a job as a DST, as this seems to me exactly the area were I think I will
    be the happiest, doing things that I enjoy most. Hence, I set to myself a
    goal of getting certified by Microsoft and find a job as a DST.

    Meanwhile I just took a job that has nothing to do with IT, to have some
    income, and kept posting my resume to different job search sites in order to
    find a job as a DST.So far I didn't get even one single offer from any
    employer. I understand that I have no "American experience", but I think
    computers are the same everywhere in the world.

    Then I tried to search this newsgroup on the subject of job hunting and the
    results just broke my heart: what I got from the few topics listed is that
    here, in the USA, DSTs are the lowest level of IT industry and they are paid
    just a miser. Above all, that it is almost impossible getting a job, even
    such a low-paid. Does all this mean I am wasting my time and I'd rather think
    of doing something else?

    Could you perhaps suggest what strategies I have to apply to find a job as a
    DST? If it involves volunteering, where to go to volunteer? As I have made a
    simple, one-page resume myself, simply stating the facts of my career and
    education, should I rather have some professionals write a resume for me? Job
    hunting sites often have some special offers to write stellar resumes that
    will increase vastly my chances of getting job-interviews. Should I turn to
    special employment agencies to get the job?

    I hope you, my fellow newsgroup members, will help me out in my confusion.
    Thank you very much in advance.
    gogona, Mar 14, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. gogona

    beb Guest

    Well is tough to get hired by a big corporation now a days but it is not
    hopeless. The trend now is for them to contract with third party providers
    for their IT solutions depending on what it is they want to solve. The trend
    also for them is to hire college graduate and groom them as administrator or
    programmers. Network administration is becoming more automated, more
    centralized and easier to implemented thus requiring less people to manage
    more clients.

    The lower tier support personnel is not that difficult to fill using third
    parties. However you should keep trying. It is always good to follow up on
    your application and resume submissions. Sign up with as many technical
    staffing firms as possible in your area and work with them on finding you a
    position no matter how temporary and network with the people who you meet
    while on assignment. No matter how much people deny it the vast majority of
    the better jobs that are available are never advertised so get to know
    people who work in the industry. Join a computer group in your community.
    Get as many certification on the technology that interest you and is in
    demand as you can because it does indicate that you are serious about your
    profession. Taking courses at the community college or any formal gathering
    in your community gives you the opportunity to network with other people who
    share the same interest and have a better knowledge of where the
    opportunities are. Although it is less then where you are from, it is still
    who you know what will help you to get a foot in the door.

    I don't know your domestic situation but been able and unafraid to move will
    be helpful. There are some parts of the country which would give you a
    better chance than others. Just getting your first experience is the hardest
    part. You can always go back to the area of the country that you like after
    getting that initial experience. Don't be afraid to take that initial low
    paying job to gain some American experience in IT, but set a goal to move on
    if you are dissatisfied with your pay. There is no standard job description
    or pay rate for support personnel it is what the respective company require
    and offer. Some will have not require that entry level personnel have any
    certificate while others will require it.

    Another avenue is to start your own company and market yourself as an
    independent contractor. There are companies which use contractors for their
    projects within your expertise and you can also sell yourself as a
    technician in your community by printing some business cards and passing
    them out and doing a good job for your customers. Word of mouth is very
    important way of getting ahead. Search for companies advertising as onsite
    technology service companies and contact them about signing up with them as
    an independent contractor, if that is something that you are interested in
    or might want to pursue. Anyway those are just a few ideas that I have to
    your question. Keep trying and Good luck.

    "gogona" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I had an Internet cafe-LAN gaming center in Greece for about 3 years but
    >had
    > to leave that country and move to the USA for personal reasons. Business
    > was
    > good and I just admired what I was doing.
    >
    > So couple of months ago, when I came to this country, I was full of hopes
    > to
    > find a job as a DST, as this seems to me exactly the area were I think I
    > will
    > be the happiest, doing things that I enjoy most. Hence, I set to myself a
    > goal of getting certified by Microsoft and find a job as a DST.
    >
    > Meanwhile I just took a job that has nothing to do with IT, to have some
    > income, and kept posting my resume to different job search sites in order
    > to
    > find a job as a DST.So far I didn't get even one single offer from any
    > employer. I understand that I have no "American experience", but I think
    > computers are the same everywhere in the world.
    >
    > Then I tried to search this newsgroup on the subject of job hunting and
    > the
    > results just broke my heart: what I got from the few topics listed is that
    > here, in the USA, DSTs are the lowest level of IT industry and they are
    > paid
    > just a miser. Above all, that it is almost impossible getting a job, even
    > such a low-paid. Does all this mean I am wasting my time and I'd rather
    > think
    > of doing something else?
    >
    > Could you perhaps suggest what strategies I have to apply to find a job as
    > a
    > DST? If it involves volunteering, where to go to volunteer? As I have made
    > a
    > simple, one-page resume myself, simply stating the facts of my career and
    > education, should I rather have some professionals write a resume for me?
    > Job
    > hunting sites often have some special offers to write stellar resumes that
    > will increase vastly my chances of getting job-interviews. Should I turn
    > to
    > special employment agencies to get the job?
    >
    > I hope you, my fellow newsgroup members, will help me out in my confusion.
    > Thank you very much in advance.
    >
    beb, Mar 14, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. gogona

    Lasher Guest

    =?Utf-8?B?Z29nb25h?= <> wrote in
    news::

    <snip>

    Spam elsewhere.


    --
    Lasher
    MCNGP 110010
    MCP/MCDST/MVMCHA
    (Most Valuable Microsoft Certified Head Asploder)
    Lasher, Mar 15, 2006
    #3
  4. gogona

    gogona Guest

    Thank you so much for your genuine support.

    "beb" wrote:

    > Well is tough to get hired by a big corporation now a days but it is not
    > hopeless. The trend now is for them to contract with third party providers
    > for their IT solutions depending on what it is they want to solve. The trend
    > also for them is to hire college graduate and groom them as administrator or
    > programmers. Network administration is becoming more automated, more
    > centralized and easier to implemented thus requiring less people to manage
    > more clients.
    >
    > The lower tier support personnel is not that difficult to fill using third
    > parties. However you should keep trying. It is always good to follow up on
    > your application and resume submissions. Sign up with as many technical
    > staffing firms as possible in your area and work with them on finding you a
    > position no matter how temporary and network with the people who you meet
    > while on assignment. No matter how much people deny it the vast majority of
    > the better jobs that are available are never advertised so get to know
    > people who work in the industry. Join a computer group in your community.
    > Get as many certification on the technology that interest you and is in
    > demand as you can because it does indicate that you are serious about your
    > profession. Taking courses at the community college or any formal gathering
    > in your community gives you the opportunity to network with other people who
    > share the same interest and have a better knowledge of where the
    > opportunities are. Although it is less then where you are from, it is still
    > who you know what will help you to get a foot in the door.
    >
    > I don't know your domestic situation but been able and unafraid to move will
    > be helpful. There are some parts of the country which would give you a
    > better chance than others. Just getting your first experience is the hardest
    > part. You can always go back to the area of the country that you like after
    > getting that initial experience. Don't be afraid to take that initial low
    > paying job to gain some American experience in IT, but set a goal to move on
    > if you are dissatisfied with your pay. There is no standard job description
    > or pay rate for support personnel it is what the respective company require
    > and offer. Some will have not require that entry level personnel have any
    > certificate while others will require it.
    >
    > Another avenue is to start your own company and market yourself as an
    > independent contractor. There are companies which use contractors for their
    > projects within your expertise and you can also sell yourself as a
    > technician in your community by printing some business cards and passing
    > them out and doing a good job for your customers. Word of mouth is very
    > important way of getting ahead. Search for companies advertising as onsite
    > technology service companies and contact them about signing up with them as
    > an independent contractor, if that is something that you are interested in
    > or might want to pursue. Anyway those are just a few ideas that I have to
    > your question. Keep trying and Good luck.
    >
    > "gogona" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I had an Internet cafe-LAN gaming center in Greece for about 3 years but
    > >had
    > > to leave that country and move to the USA for personal reasons. Business
    > > was
    > > good and I just admired what I was doing.
    > >
    > > So couple of months ago, when I came to this country, I was full of hopes
    > > to
    > > find a job as a DST, as this seems to me exactly the area were I think I
    > > will
    > > be the happiest, doing things that I enjoy most. Hence, I set to myself a
    > > goal of getting certified by Microsoft and find a job as a DST.
    > >
    > > Meanwhile I just took a job that has nothing to do with IT, to have some
    > > income, and kept posting my resume to different job search sites in order
    > > to
    > > find a job as a DST.So far I didn't get even one single offer from any
    > > employer. I understand that I have no "American experience", but I think
    > > computers are the same everywhere in the world.
    > >
    > > Then I tried to search this newsgroup on the subject of job hunting and
    > > the
    > > results just broke my heart: what I got from the few topics listed is that
    > > here, in the USA, DSTs are the lowest level of IT industry and they are
    > > paid
    > > just a miser. Above all, that it is almost impossible getting a job, even
    > > such a low-paid. Does all this mean I am wasting my time and I'd rather
    > > think
    > > of doing something else?
    > >
    > > Could you perhaps suggest what strategies I have to apply to find a job as
    > > a
    > > DST? If it involves volunteering, where to go to volunteer? As I have made
    > > a
    > > simple, one-page resume myself, simply stating the facts of my career and
    > > education, should I rather have some professionals write a resume for me?
    > > Job
    > > hunting sites often have some special offers to write stellar resumes that
    > > will increase vastly my chances of getting job-interviews. Should I turn
    > > to
    > > special employment agencies to get the job?
    > >
    > > I hope you, my fellow newsgroup members, will help me out in my confusion.
    > > Thank you very much in advance.
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    gogona, Mar 15, 2006
    #4
  5. gogona

    Lasher Guest

    =?Utf-8?B?Z29nb25h?= <> wrote in
    news::

    > Thank you so much for your genuine support.
    >


    This isn't a survey forum, nor are any of the other NG's. If you want to
    ask a question, ask it and read the response from that one thread.

    --
    Lasher
    MCNGP 110010
    MCP/MCDST/MVMCHA
    (Most Valuable Microsoft Certified Head Asploder)
    Lasher, Mar 15, 2006
    #5
  6. gogona

    gogona Guest

    We might dreaming of supporting users, that's what this NG is about, I guess,
    but if it comes to support each other, we must be as cold as ice. Did I get
    you right?

    "Lasher" wrote:

    > =?Utf-8?B?Z29nb25h?= <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > Thank you so much for your genuine support.
    > >

    >
    > This isn't a survey forum, nor are any of the other NG's. If you want to
    > ask a question, ask it and read the response from that one thread.
    >
    > --
    > Lasher
    > MCNGP 110010
    > MCP/MCDST/MVMCHA
    > (Most Valuable Microsoft Certified Head Asploder)
    >
    gogona, Mar 15, 2006
    #6
  7. gogona

    Lasher Guest

    =?Utf-8?B?Z29nb25h?= <> wrote in
    news::

    > We might dreaming of supporting users, that's what this NG is about, I
    > guess, but if it comes to support each other, we must be as cold as
    > ice. Did I get you right?
    >


    Go to the MCSE NG and read the response to your inquiry. I've even posted
    a reply to this before.

    --
    Lasher
    MCNGP 110010
    MCP/MCDST/MVMCHA
    (Most Valuable Microsoft Certified Head Asploder)
    Lasher, Mar 15, 2006
    #7
  8. gogona

    Lasher Guest

    TechGeekPro <%username%@gmail.com> wrote in news:Xns9787A2A6C8A0Ftgp@
    127.0.0.1:

    > On Mar 14, 2006 at 8:59pm "Lasher" blathered:
    >
    >> =?Utf-8?B?Z29nb25h?= <> wrote in
    >> news::
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> Spam elsewhere.

    >
    > How is that considered spam?
    >


    I know this is the second/third time I've seen this post.

    --
    Lasher
    MCNGP 110010
    MCP/MCDST/MVMCHA
    (Most Valuable Microsoft Certified Head Asploder)
    Lasher, Mar 15, 2006
    #8
    1. Advertising

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