Jewel shoot

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by teflon, May 24, 2005.

  1. teflon

    teflon Guest

    I need to photograph a variety of jewelry pieces on white background.
    (rings, brooches, necklaces and earrings, both precious stones and pearls)

    There are about 40 - 50 shots that I need to do in one day, so I need some
    tried and tested tips on fixing things into position quickly and safely with
    as little need for Photoshop editing as possible.

    I thought of using 'polyboard' where an assistant can get the next shot
    ready on a separate table using whatever method is suitable. The 'set' could
    then be placed into the lighting for final arrangement. I've heard that some
    use wax for the most delicate of pieces (how do they do that?)

    Any ideas would be most welcome.

    Many thanks.
    teflon, May 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. teflon

    Claude Guest

    Good Morning,

    On the B&H Website:
    http://www.bhwebphotoschool.com/Shooting_Jewelry_in_a_Tent_
    1/index.html

    Hope this will help.

    CT.


    teflon <> wrote in
    news:BEB8D3A9.15255%:

    > I need to photograph a variety of jewelry pieces on white

    background.
    > (rings, brooches, necklaces and earrings, both precious stones and
    > pearls)
    >
    > There are about 40 - 50 shots that I need to do in one day, so I

    need
    > some tried and tested tips on fixing things into position quickly

    and
    > safely with as little need for Photoshop editing as possible.
    >
    > I thought of using 'polyboard' where an assistant can get the next
    > shot ready on a separate table using whatever method is suitable.

    The
    > 'set' could then be placed into the lighting for final arrangement.
    > I've heard that some use wax for the most delicate of pieces (how do
    > they do that?)
    >
    > Any ideas would be most welcome.
    >
    > Many thanks.
    >
    >
    Claude, May 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. teflon

    teflon Guest

    On 24/5/05 6:03 pm, in article
    Xns966084CD7108Bclaudehdottawacom@216.196.97.142, "Claude" <>
    wrote:

    > Good Morning,
    >
    > On the B&H Website:
    > http://www.bhwebphotoschool.com/Shooting_Jewelry_in_a_Tent_
    > 1/index.html
    >
    > Hope this will help.
    >
    > CT.


    Thanks. I've not heard of 'earthquake-tac'. I'll have a look round the art
    shop. It sounds ideal for metal and stones - not sure about pearls though!
    ;]
    teflon, May 24, 2005
    #3
  4. teflon

    NewsDroid Guest

    In article <BEB9525F.15359%>,
    teflon <> wrote:

    > > On the B&H Website:
    > > http://www.bhwebphotoschool.com/Shooting_Jewelry_in_a_Tent_
    > > 1/index.html
    > >
    > > Hope this will help.
    > >
    > > CT.

    >
    > Thanks. I've not heard of 'earthquake-tac'. I'll have a look round the art
    > shop. It sounds ideal for metal and stones - not sure about pearls though!
    > ;]


    We know it a Blu-tak or Blu-tac. It's the slightly sticky material used
    for temporary fixing. Won't have any effect on pearls. Only needed to
    hold rings and such in position "standing on edge".

    --
    .....NewsDroid
    NewsDroid, May 25, 2005
    #4
  5. teflon

    Stewy Guest

    In article <BEB8D3A9.15255%>,
    teflon <> wrote:

    > I need to photograph a variety of jewelry pieces on white background.
    > (rings, brooches, necklaces and earrings, both precious stones and pearls)
    >
    > There are about 40 - 50 shots that I need to do in one day, so I need some
    > tried and tested tips on fixing things into position quickly and safely with
    > as little need for Photoshop editing as possible.
    >
    > I thought of using 'polyboard' where an assistant can get the next shot
    > ready on a separate table using whatever method is suitable. The 'set' could
    > then be placed into the lighting for final arrangement. I've heard that some
    > use wax for the most delicate of pieces (how do they do that?)
    >
    > Any ideas would be most welcome.
    >
    > Many thanks.


    Many photographers use a 'light box' to avoid harsh shadows and a more
    even lighting. It's basically a wooden framework of half-inch square
    wood or doweling slotted into small blocks about 24 - 30 inches on
    either side covered in thin cotton or similar, open at the bottom and a
    small aperture on one side for the camera. Direct the photo lighting
    from above and from both sides with a less intense light at the back.
    Shoot at minimum aperture.

    To hold the pieces in place use white plasticine and fishing line to
    suspend things like necklaces.
    Stewy, May 25, 2005
    #5
  6. teflon

    teflon Guest

    On 25/5/05 2:52 pm, in article
    , "Stewy"
    <> wrote:

    > In article <BEB8D3A9.15255%>,
    > teflon <> wrote:
    >
    >> I need to photograph a variety of jewelry pieces on white background.
    >> (rings, brooches, necklaces and earrings, both precious stones and pearls)
    >>
    >> There are about 40 - 50 shots that I need to do in one day, so I need some
    >> tried and tested tips on fixing things into position quickly and safely with
    >> as little need for Photoshop editing as possible.
    >>
    >> I thought of using 'polyboard' where an assistant can get the next shot
    >> ready on a separate table using whatever method is suitable. The 'set' could
    >> then be placed into the lighting for final arrangement. I've heard that some
    >> use wax for the most delicate of pieces (how do they do that?)
    >>
    >> Any ideas would be most welcome.
    >>
    >> Many thanks.

    >
    > Many photographers use a 'light box' to avoid harsh shadows and a more
    > even lighting. It's basically a wooden framework of half-inch square
    > wood or doweling slotted into small blocks about 24 - 30 inches on
    > either side covered in thin cotton or similar, open at the bottom and a
    > small aperture on one side for the camera. Direct the photo lighting
    > from above and from both sides with a less intense light at the back.
    > Shoot at minimum aperture.
    >
    > To hold the pieces in place use white plasticine and fishing line to
    > suspend things like necklaces.


    Thanks for the tip.
    teflon, May 25, 2005
    #6
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