I've read about "adaptive optics" as used by the US military, intelligence agencies, etc in satellit

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Scotius, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. Scotius

    Scotius Guest

    Suppose you've taken a photo that is blurred (not due to
    movement, but due to improper focus).
    Would it be possible, if you could look through just the right
    type of lens, to see the picture correctly focused?
    If so, would it be possible for software to calculate the
    focus problem, or even for a photographer to just go through
    progressively different foci to fix something that is blurred?
     
    Scotius, Jul 12, 2010
    #1
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  2. Scotius

    Chrlz Guest

    Re: I've read about "adaptive optics" as used by the US military,intelligence agencies, etc in satellite imagery, but what about using opticsto correct out of focus pictures? Is this possible?

    On Jul 12, 4:04 pm, Scotius <> wrote:
    >         Suppose you've taken a photo that is blurred (not due to
    > movement, but due to improper focus).
    >         Would it be possible, if you could look through just the right
    > type of lens, to see the picture correctly focused?
    >         If so, would it be possible for software to calculate the
    > focus problem, or even for a photographer to just go through
    > progressively different foci to fix something that is blurred?


    Google 'deconvolution' and/or 'richardson-lucy'

    To answer your question simplistically.. No. :) *Some* processing
    techniques can recover *some* information, but in essence, once the
    detail is blurred into other detail, you can never be quite sure that
    what you recover is real.. Typically, deconvolution introduces
    artefacts along with any 'recovered' detail.

    It's a bit like enlarging - there's no free lunch - if you want real
    detail, you must capture it adequately in the first place.
     
    Chrlz, Jul 13, 2010
    #2
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  3. Scotius

    whisky-dave Guest

    "Scotius" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Suppose you've taken a photo that is blurred (not due to
    > movement, but due to improper focus).
    > Would it be possible, if you could look through just the right
    > type of lens, to see the picture correctly focused?
    > If so, would it be possible for software to calculate the
    > focus problem, or even for a photographer to just go through
    > progressively different foci to fix something that is blurred?


    I very muvh doubt it, and I thought adaptive optics was used
    to partialy overcome atmospheric interference. This is employed in ground
    based networked telescopes both for visible light and radi wave and IR I
    think.It's used by adapting the shape of the 'reflector' or whatever is
    grabbing the data from teh objects
     
    whisky-dave, Jul 15, 2010
    #3
  4. Scotius

    Martin Brown Guest

    Re: I've read about "adaptive optics" as used by the US military,intelligence agencies, etc in satellite imagery, but what about using opticsto correct out of focus pictures? Is this possible?

    On 15/07/2010 13:51, whisky-dave wrote:
    > "Scotius"<> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Suppose you've taken a photo that is blurred (not due to
    >> movement, but due to improper focus).
    >> Would it be possible, if you could look through just the right
    >> type of lens, to see the picture correctly focused?


    In general "the right type of lens" cannot be physically realised.

    >> If so, would it be possible for software to calculate the
    >> focus problem, or even for a photographer to just go through
    >> progressively different foci to fix something that is blurred?


    Software solutions exist for deconvolution of images with a uniform or
    nearly uniform well characterised point spread function. Methods used to
    make the Hubble images before its myopia was corrected for instance.

    And there are clever coded aperture imaging arrays where the data
    collected is used to infer an image with better light grasp and much
    larger depth of field than a conventional circular lens aperture. eg

    http://www.paulcarlisle.net/old/codedaperture.html
    >
    > I very muvh doubt it, and I thought adaptive optics was used
    > to partialy overcome atmospheric interference. This is employed in ground
    > based networked telescopes both for visible light and radi wave and IR I
    > think.It's used by adapting the shape of the 'reflector' or whatever is
    > grabbing the data from teh objects


    There is a "rubber" mirror somewhere in the imaging train that is used
    to adjust the wavefronts to obtain the sharpest possible rendition of an
    artificial or real guide star. It is able to take out some of the
    atmospheric seeing on big scopes.

    Cheap versions to take out tip-tilt errors are available to amateur
    astronomers and for small fields of view like planets the humble webcam
    coupled with software allows keen amateurs to get images that would be
    better than top observatories could manage a few decades ago.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown
     
    Martin Brown, Jul 15, 2010
    #4
  5. Scotius

    Guest

    On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 13:51:52 +0100, "whisky-dave"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Scotius" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Suppose you've taken a photo that is blurred (not due to
    >> movement, but due to improper focus).
    >> Would it be possible, if you could look through just the right
    >> type of lens, to see the picture correctly focused?
    >> If so, would it be possible for software to calculate the
    >> focus problem, or even for a photographer to just go through
    >> progressively different foci to fix something that is blurred?

    >
    >I very muvh doubt it, and I thought adaptive optics was used
    >to partialy overcome atmospheric interference. This is employed in ground
    >based networked telescopes both for visible light and radi wave and IR I
    >think.It's used by adapting the shape of the 'reflector' or whatever is
    >grabbing the data from teh objects
    >


    I think you're right. I do recall reading that it was for
    overcoming atmospheric interference, but this was quite a while back.
    I suppose that's what I get for posting about something from an
    article I read around 10 years ago.
    On the plus side, someone suggested looking up deconvolution,
    and also that focus magic is a great program for addressing the
    problem, so I ended up with some useful info even though I was
    radically wrong about "adaptive optics".
    It's a good group.
     
    , Aug 30, 2010
    #5
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