IT mispritn of the weak: subtitle: Fairfax hasn't improved anything

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Steve B, Jul 20, 2003.

  1. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    From a story about bill-inflating dialler pop-ups, originally
    published in the Manawatu Evening Standard.

    "He said Bevan tried to avoid the computer dialling up to the site by
    pulling a chord out of the modem and resetting the computer."

    It's as much as I can do to get a decent single-line melody out of
    mine.

    Steve B.
    Steve B, Jul 20, 2003
    #1
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  2. "Steve B" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > From a story about bill-inflating dialler pop-ups, originally
    > published in the Manawatu Evening Standard.
    >
    > "He said Bevan tried to avoid the computer dialling up to the site by
    > pulling a chord out of the modem and resetting the computer."
    >
    > It's as much as I can do to get a decent single-line melody out of
    > mine.
    >


    You only get dialers when you go to porn/warez websites. User education is
    again the key to stopping viruses :)

    Cheers,
    Nicholas Sherlock
    Nicholas Sherlock, Jul 20, 2003
    #2
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  3. Steve B

    Brian Harmer Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 14:44:27 +1200, "Nicholas Sherlock"
    <> wrote:

    >"Steve B" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> From a story about bill-inflating dialler pop-ups, originally
    >> published in the Manawatu Evening Standard.
    >>
    >> "He said Bevan tried to avoid the computer dialling up to the site by
    >> pulling a chord out of the modem and resetting the computer."
    >>
    >> It's as much as I can do to get a decent single-line melody out of
    >> mine.
    >>

    >
    >You only get dialers when you go to porn/warez websites. User education is
    >again the key to stopping viruses :)


    I fear that was a lost chord, Steve, but it has been noted and
    disaster staved off.
    Brian Harmer, Jul 20, 2003
    #3
  4. Steve B

    Newsman Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 13:02:56 +1200, Steve B
    <> wrote:

    >From a story about bill-inflating dialler pop-ups, originally
    >published in the Manawatu Evening Standard.
    >
    >"He said Bevan tried to avoid the computer dialling up to the site by
    >pulling a chord out of the modem and resetting the computer."


    Sunday Star Times of 13 July

    "Review" supplement (supposedly literate and educated)

    "First words" column by Jo McCarroll:

    "Occasionally throughout the long, long evening a younger folk
    musician - possibly in his late 70s - would direct a particularly
    piteous lament at Jaqui or I (sic), somewhat overstimulated at the
    thought of unfamiliar DNA".

    (This is from a little article gently mocking the ways of some locals
    in their Devonshire pub.)

    What irony that, in mocking others, she should so easily betray her
    own ignorance.

    Hoist with her own petard as is her slip-shod editor.

    In the previous week's edition I came upon "touer" for "tour",
    presumably spelt as pronounced the Kiwi way.
    Newsman, Jul 20, 2003
    #4
  5. "Nicholas Sherlock" <> wrote in message
    news:bfd13h$vl8$...
    > "Steve B" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > From a story about bill-inflating dialler pop-ups, originally
    > > published in the Manawatu Evening Standard.
    > >
    > > "He said Bevan tried to avoid the computer dialling up to the site by
    > > pulling a chord out of the modem and resetting the computer."
    > >
    > > It's as much as I can do to get a decent single-line melody out of
    > > mine.
    > >

    >
    > You only get dialers when you go to porn/warez websites. User education is
    > again the key to stopping viruses :)
    >

    I'm afraid that's not so. Lots of diallers lurk behind pop-ups claiming to
    speed up your computer or protect you from viruses - some even hide behind
    offers of software to protect you from diallers.

    The answer in legal terms is quite simple: change the telecom regulations to
    make any such bills unenforceable without the prior consent of the line
    owner in writing.

    Philip
    Philip Crookes, Jul 20, 2003
    #5
  6. > I'm afraid that's not so. Lots of diallers lurk behind pop-ups claiming to
    > speed up your computer or protect you from viruses - some even hide behind
    > offers of software to protect you from diallers.
    >
    > The answer in legal terms is quite simple: change the telecom regulations to
    > make any such bills unenforceable without the prior consent of the line
    > owner in writing.


    Why? they are consenting to the charges by allowing the computer to use there
    phoneline. In all cases I have seen of these dialers, there has been an EULA
    that has to be accepted before the connection is made, which was authough
    verbose did state that you were connecting directly to there network and that
    there may be call charges involved. Making it so that you cannot charge for
    calls that people have allowed to be made on there own phone line is pretty much
    opening it up for anyone to claim that they didnt mean to make calls that they did.

    If you cant control your computer, dont plug it in. This is the same reason that
    I refused to allow a sky box to be connected to my phone line.
    Richard Malcolm-Smith, Jul 20, 2003
    #6
  7. "Steve B"

    .... an "IT mispritn", huh?
    Simon Pleasants, Jul 20, 2003
    #7
  8. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 21:45:41 +1200, "Simon Pleasants"
    <> wrote:

    >"Steve B"
    >
    >... an "IT mispritn", huh?
    >

    Yes; ",,,of the weak" (you didn't spot that one).

    The technology really should allow us to set some posts in 12pt
    ironics font to make our pupose bleedin' obvious.
    Steve B, Jul 20, 2003
    #8
  9. Steve B

    Steve B Guest

    On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 11:00:53 +0200, "Philip Crookes"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Richard Malcolm-Smith" <> wrote in message
    >news:bfdc0j$7k6$...
    >> > I'm afraid that's not so. Lots of diallers lurk behind pop-ups claiming

    >to
    >> > speed up your computer or protect you from viruses - some even hide

    >behind
    >> > offers of software to protect you from diallers.

    >[...]
    >>In all cases I have seen of these dialers, there has been an

    >EULA
    >> that has to be accepted before the connection is made, which was authough
    >> verbose did state that you were connecting directly to there network and

    >that
    >> there may be call charges involved.

    >Wrong, wrong and wrong again. I've seen many of these diallers that inivte
    >no formal acceptance of Ts & Cs, mute the modem so there's no eveidence of a
    >new call being made, and deliberately try to conceal what's happening from
    >the user.

    [...]
    >> Making it so that you cannot charge for
    >> calls that people have allowed to be made on there own phone line is

    >pretty much
    >> opening it up for anyone to claim that they didnt mean to make calls that

    >they did.
    >
    >Not necessarily so. For starters we're only talking about modem dialup of
    >0900 and international calls. And second, if you've connected to internet
    >through a normal ISP you're entitled to expect that you won't be
    >disconnected and arbitrarily re-routed through some other more expensive
    >connection without being informed about what's happening to you and what
    >it's going to cost.
    >
    >Second, there are a great many users who aren't as informed about computer
    >use as you might be. Why should these rip-off merchants be allowed to hijack
    >their normal use of an online connection?
    >
    >It's a shit business: its operators deserve to be treated like the
    >slimeballs they are.


    Agreed. There are not always T&C documents displayed (fortunately, on
    a cable connection, with no dial-up line even connected to the
    computer except in emergencies, I cannot be attacked in this way (I
    hope!) and an increasing number of people will be in that situation).

    And no, it's NOT always porn: it started with porn (as a lot of things
    did) and got a *good* start because of the attitude of law enforcement
    that porn consumers deserved anything they got.

    "He wouldn't have a great deal of public sympathy". Senior NZ Police
    spokesman justifying no Police action on an early victim of the fake
    (one letter away from the genuine URL) porn website scam.

    The non-porn equivalents are now, of course, coming onto the scene; as
    they are with diallers.

    The problem with these people is the same as the problem with spam.
    There are too many "legitimate" businesses employing techniques close
    to this but not quite (eg doing it with a clearly displayed but wordy
    T&C, with the important bits below the scroll horizon and boxes
    pre-ticked 'yes'). "How do you define clearly what's legitimate and
    what's not? and it's all coming from overseas (again, that doesn't
    seem to be a problem for legislation where porn is concerned) and we
    have other priorities like fighting the major threat of online
    terrorism and it's all too much for us to deal with."

    And Nicholas's:
    >You only get dialers when you go to porn/warez websites.


    is the kind of message Govt and Miscrosoft would love you for. Be a
    good Little Red Engine, stay on the rails, stop at the red lights, use
    Xtra-MSN-NBC as your guide to "safe" sites and never stray off into
    the long grass and pick the flowers. Then you'll not meet any of these
    nasty unscrupulous people.
    (acknowledgement Vance Packard "The Hidden Persuaders")

    I have this strange heretical pov that the consumers of legal porn
    have as much right to protection from scammers as any other citizen.
    "Warez" - I don't want to get into that argument. I'm not sure the
    piracy message of MS and others "has much public sympathy" to quote
    our friendly Det Insp. But I'd be very wary of buying anything from an
    irregular source I couldn't subsequently trace because of the
    possibility of infection.

    I do agree with:

    >User education is
    >again the key to stopping viruses :)


    Steve B.
    Steve B, Jul 21, 2003
    #9
  10. Steve B

    Gavin Tunney Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 18:15:21 +1200, Richard Malcolm-Smith
    <> wrote:

    >> I'm afraid that's not so. Lots of diallers lurk behind pop-ups claiming to
    >> speed up your computer or protect you from viruses - some even hide behind
    >> offers of software to protect you from diallers.
    >>
    >> The answer in legal terms is quite simple: change the telecom regulations to
    >> make any such bills unenforceable without the prior consent of the line
    >> owner in writing.

    >
    >Why? they are consenting to the charges by allowing the computer to use there
    >phoneline. In all cases I have seen of these dialers, there has been an EULA
    >that has to be accepted before the connection is made, which was authough
    >verbose did state that you were connecting directly to there network and that
    >there may be call charges involved. Making it so that you cannot charge for
    >calls that people have allowed to be made on there own phone line is pretty much
    >opening it up for anyone to claim that they didnt mean to make calls that they did.
    >
    >If you cant control your computer, dont plug it in. This is the same reason that
    >I refused to allow a sky box to be connected to my phone line.


    I think you're being a bit harsh there Richard. I've seen numerous
    diallers that install themselves silently. Most these days seem to be
    installed via ActiveX controls & all it takes for them to be installed
    without the user realising is for IE to have moderately low security
    settings in the internet zone. Security is a major problem these days
    because you can't browse half the sites on the web without enabling
    all sorts of shite, and the average user has little idea on what all
    the settings do or what they're for.

    I'll also add that many people get diallers by clicking on a link in a
    search engine. The link may well lead to a porn site or warez site,
    but the user often doesn't know that until they click on it and then
    the damage has been done. Porn sites are notorious for tricks that get
    them to the top of search engines.

    Gavin
    Gavin Tunney, Jul 21, 2003
    #10
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