IT Increases Value Of Skills

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. A study shows that IT depresses the value of unskilled work, which I don’t
    find too surprising
    <http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2010/06/workers-need-education-to-stay-ahead-of-it-curve.ars>.

    On the bright side, it increases the value of those skilled enough to keep
    up:

    Highly educated workers are able to offset this effect with the positive
    influence of education-IT interaction— they can integrate new
    technologies into their workflow. Less-educated workers, on the other
    hand, are left blank-faced in front of a computer screen.

    To me, this further reinforces the need to avoid vendor-specific
    qualifications. For example, there are those advocating sticking to
    Microsoft-based and other such proprietary products in schools and
    polytechs, on the assumption that those are the products they will be using
    out in the “real worldâ€. Trouble is, if their skillset is that narrow,
    they’re not going to be earning much in the real world anyway. For example,
    what happens to those trained on Office 2003 when they’re sat in front of a
    machine running Office 2007 or 2010? Where in the “ribbon†will they find
    all those menu options they were trained to use, like rats trained to run a
    maze? They’re stuffed.

    Better to concentrate on deeper skills, like all the different ways you can
    use a computer to solve problems. That kind of thing makes you much more
    employable.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jun 29, 2010
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Brian Dooley Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 20:19:30 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >A study shows that IT depresses the value of unskilled work, which I don’t
    >find too surprising
    ><http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2010/06/workers-need-education-to-stay-ahead-of-it-curve.ars>.
    >
    >On the bright side, it increases the value of those skilled enough to keep
    >up:
    >
    > Highly educated workers are able to offset this effect with the positive
    > influence of education-IT interaction— they can integrate new
    > technologies into their workflow. Less-educated workers, on the other
    > hand, are left blank-faced in front of a computer screen.
    >
    >To me, this further reinforces the need to avoid vendor-specific
    >qualifications. For example, there are those advocating sticking to
    >Microsoft-based and other such proprietary products in schools and
    >polytechs, on the assumption that those are the products they will be using
    >out in the “real world”. Trouble is, if their skillset is that narrow,
    >they’re not going to be earning much in the real world anyway. For example,
    >what happens to those trained on Office 2003 when they’re sat in front of a
    >machine running Office 2007 or 2010? Where in the “ribbon” will they find
    >all those menu options they were trained to use, like rats trained to run a
    >maze? They’re stuffed.
    >
    >Better to concentrate on deeper skills, like all the different ways you can
    >use a computer to solve problems. That kind of thing makes you much more
    >employable.


    Bugger, does this mean that all the time I spent swinging a pick
    has been wasted?
    --

    Brian Dooley

    Wellington New Zealand
     
    Brian Dooley, Jul 4, 2010
    #2
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