IT as a Career

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by petec, Sep 5, 2003.

  1. petec

    petec Guest

    Career

    A few observations on IT as a career.

    I am four years into my career as an IT professional. It
    is the forth time I have retrained over the years,
    industry changes, you change, life moves on.

    IT seemed to be the big money earner when I had to
    retrain, first MCSE NT4 followed by a job consolidating
    the theory, I really fell in at the deep end there, but
    learnt the trade quickly.

    Then MCSE 2000 the hard way, sit at home with two PC's
    configured as servers with the New Riders series and
    flogged my way through the exams.

    Now I am about to tackle MCSE 2003. (I'm lucky that my
    family responsibilities have now grown up and look after
    themselves.) but I do feel sorry for the younger members
    of our staff trying to keep up. New babies, young
    children needing attention etc. and for what ? A skill
    set that is only good for couple of years before the next
    generation of products requires more retraining and wage
    levels considerably less than a skilled plumber and less
    than I made ten years ago.

    I enjoy what I do the mental challenge of making systems
    work and fixing the dead ones is stimulating, I love it,
    but you kids out there who are looking at IT as a life
    career, stop and rethink.

    I was part of team interviewing for a senior position
    recently, six applicants, five of which were highly
    skiled IT managers with excelent CV's, but none had up
    graded from NT4, we are 100% Microsoft 2000. Most of them
    could not answer simple system questions, and lacked
    awareness of the complete change that Windows 2000 was
    from NT4 (the further you go into management the further
    you get away from systems knowledge, I know, hence the
    retraining) Who got the job? The MCSA with hands on
    experience.

    Be warned though, systems integration means fewer
    servers, more bandwidth means more people working from
    home. Will remote administration mean out sourcing to
    third world companies, hence lower wages and less skills
    required on site? It is not hard to envisage though times
    ahead for many IT personnel. Best of luck people.
    petec, Sep 5, 2003
    #1
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  2. petec

    roYal Guest

    stop and think, when you baby-boomers are gone, what will happen? US new
    generation are going to take over. So if all of us stop and re-think, and
    don't go into IT, when the baby boomer generation is gone, IT will cripple?
    Naawww, i don't think so.
    "petec" <> wrote in message
    news:27c801c3736d$5b4342b0$...
    > Career
    >
    > A few observations on IT as a career.
    >
    > I am four years into my career as an IT professional. It
    > is the forth time I have retrained over the years,
    > industry changes, you change, life moves on.
    >
    > IT seemed to be the big money earner when I had to
    > retrain, first MCSE NT4 followed by a job consolidating
    > the theory, I really fell in at the deep end there, but
    > learnt the trade quickly.
    >
    > Then MCSE 2000 the hard way, sit at home with two PC's
    > configured as servers with the New Riders series and
    > flogged my way through the exams.
    >
    > Now I am about to tackle MCSE 2003. (I'm lucky that my
    > family responsibilities have now grown up and look after
    > themselves.) but I do feel sorry for the younger members
    > of our staff trying to keep up. New babies, young
    > children needing attention etc. and for what ? A skill
    > set that is only good for couple of years before the next
    > generation of products requires more retraining and wage
    > levels considerably less than a skilled plumber and less
    > than I made ten years ago.
    >
    > I enjoy what I do the mental challenge of making systems
    > work and fixing the dead ones is stimulating, I love it,
    > but you kids out there who are looking at IT as a life
    > career, stop and rethink.
    >
    > I was part of team interviewing for a senior position
    > recently, six applicants, five of which were highly
    > skiled IT managers with excelent CV's, but none had up
    > graded from NT4, we are 100% Microsoft 2000. Most of them
    > could not answer simple system questions, and lacked
    > awareness of the complete change that Windows 2000 was
    > from NT4 (the further you go into management the further
    > you get away from systems knowledge, I know, hence the
    > retraining) Who got the job? The MCSA with hands on
    > experience.
    >
    > Be warned though, systems integration means fewer
    > servers, more bandwidth means more people working from
    > home. Will remote administration mean out sourcing to
    > third world companies, hence lower wages and less skills
    > required on site? It is not hard to envisage though times
    > ahead for many IT personnel. Best of luck people.
    >
    >
    roYal, Sep 5, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. petec

    Maestro Guest

    You clearly missed the whole message of his post!
    Fortunately, you're the only who stands to lose anything
    due to your short sightedness.

    >-----Original Message-----
    >stop and think, when you baby-boomers are gone, what will

    happen? US new
    >generation are going to take over. So if all of us stop

    and re-think, and
    >don't go into IT, when the baby boomer generation is

    gone, IT will cripple?
    >Naawww, i don't think so.
    >"petec" <> wrote in message
    >news:27c801c3736d$5b4342b0$...
    >> Career
    >>
    >> A few observations on IT as a career.
    >>
    >> I am four years into my career as an IT professional. It
    >> is the forth time I have retrained over the years,
    >> industry changes, you change, life moves on.
    >>
    >> IT seemed to be the big money earner when I had to
    >> retrain, first MCSE NT4 followed by a job consolidating
    >> the theory, I really fell in at the deep end there, but
    >> learnt the trade quickly.
    >>
    >> Then MCSE 2000 the hard way, sit at home with two PC's
    >> configured as servers with the New Riders series and
    >> flogged my way through the exams.
    >>
    >> Now I am about to tackle MCSE 2003. (I'm lucky that my
    >> family responsibilities have now grown up and look after
    >> themselves.) but I do feel sorry for the younger

    members
    >> of our staff trying to keep up. New babies, young
    >> children needing attention etc. and for what ? A skill
    >> set that is only good for couple of years before the

    next
    >> generation of products requires more retraining and wage
    >> levels considerably less than a skilled plumber and less
    >> than I made ten years ago.
    >>
    >> I enjoy what I do the mental challenge of making systems
    >> work and fixing the dead ones is stimulating, I love it,
    >> but you kids out there who are looking at IT as a life
    >> career, stop and rethink.
    >>
    >> I was part of team interviewing for a senior position
    >> recently, six applicants, five of which were highly
    >> skiled IT managers with excelent CV's, but none had up
    >> graded from NT4, we are 100% Microsoft 2000. Most of

    them
    >> could not answer simple system questions, and lacked
    >> awareness of the complete change that Windows 2000 was
    >> from NT4 (the further you go into management the further
    >> you get away from systems knowledge, I know, hence the
    >> retraining) Who got the job? The MCSA with hands on
    >> experience.
    >>
    >> Be warned though, systems integration means fewer
    >> servers, more bandwidth means more people working from
    >> home. Will remote administration mean out sourcing to
    >> third world companies, hence lower wages and less skills
    >> required on site? It is not hard to envisage though

    times
    >> ahead for many IT personnel. Best of luck people.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >.
    >
    Maestro, Sep 9, 2003
    #3
  4. petec

    Consultant Guest

    indeed

    all are jobs are belong to them, or not

    "Maestro" <> wrote in message
    news:043601c37703$aaaeb750$...
    > You clearly missed the whole message of his post!
    > Fortunately, you're the only who stands to lose anything
    > due to your short sightedness.
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >stop and think, when you baby-boomers are gone, what will

    > happen? US new
    > >generation are going to take over. So if all of us stop

    > and re-think, and
    > >don't go into IT, when the baby boomer generation is

    > gone, IT will cripple?
    > >Naawww, i don't think so.
    > >"petec" <> wrote in message
    > >news:27c801c3736d$5b4342b0$...
    > >> Career
    > >>
    > >> A few observations on IT as a career.
    > >>
    > >> I am four years into my career as an IT professional. It
    > >> is the forth time I have retrained over the years,
    > >> industry changes, you change, life moves on.
    > >>
    > >> IT seemed to be the big money earner when I had to
    > >> retrain, first MCSE NT4 followed by a job consolidating
    > >> the theory, I really fell in at the deep end there, but
    > >> learnt the trade quickly.
    > >>
    > >> Then MCSE 2000 the hard way, sit at home with two PC's
    > >> configured as servers with the New Riders series and
    > >> flogged my way through the exams.
    > >>
    > >> Now I am about to tackle MCSE 2003. (I'm lucky that my
    > >> family responsibilities have now grown up and look after
    > >> themselves.) but I do feel sorry for the younger

    > members
    > >> of our staff trying to keep up. New babies, young
    > >> children needing attention etc. and for what ? A skill
    > >> set that is only good for couple of years before the

    > next
    > >> generation of products requires more retraining and wage
    > >> levels considerably less than a skilled plumber and less
    > >> than I made ten years ago.
    > >>
    > >> I enjoy what I do the mental challenge of making systems
    > >> work and fixing the dead ones is stimulating, I love it,
    > >> but you kids out there who are looking at IT as a life
    > >> career, stop and rethink.
    > >>
    > >> I was part of team interviewing for a senior position
    > >> recently, six applicants, five of which were highly
    > >> skiled IT managers with excelent CV's, but none had up
    > >> graded from NT4, we are 100% Microsoft 2000. Most of

    > them
    > >> could not answer simple system questions, and lacked
    > >> awareness of the complete change that Windows 2000 was
    > >> from NT4 (the further you go into management the further
    > >> you get away from systems knowledge, I know, hence the
    > >> retraining) Who got the job? The MCSA with hands on
    > >> experience.
    > >>
    > >> Be warned though, systems integration means fewer
    > >> servers, more bandwidth means more people working from
    > >> home. Will remote administration mean out sourcing to
    > >> third world companies, hence lower wages and less skills
    > >> required on site? It is not hard to envisage though

    > times
    > >> ahead for many IT personnel. Best of luck people.
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
    Consultant, Sep 9, 2003
    #4
  5. petec

    roYal Guest

    hmm, that's odd. I didn't see the whole message. I think i got cut off or
    something where it didn't download the whole message. Sorry about that
    petec. I re-read it and it was a vary valuable post. Again, i apologize
    for my complete ignorance. Thanks for the good post again.

    "Maestro" <> wrote in message
    news:043601c37703$aaaeb750$...
    > You clearly missed the whole message of his post!
    > Fortunately, you're the only who stands to lose anything
    > due to your short sightedness.
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >stop and think, when you baby-boomers are gone, what will

    > happen? US new
    > >generation are going to take over. So if all of us stop

    > and re-think, and
    > >don't go into IT, when the baby boomer generation is

    > gone, IT will cripple?
    > >Naawww, i don't think so.
    > >"petec" <> wrote in message
    > >news:27c801c3736d$5b4342b0$...
    > >> Career
    > >>
    > >> A few observations on IT as a career.
    > >>
    > >> I am four years into my career as an IT professional. It
    > >> is the forth time I have retrained over the years,
    > >> industry changes, you change, life moves on.
    > >>
    > >> IT seemed to be the big money earner when I had to
    > >> retrain, first MCSE NT4 followed by a job consolidating
    > >> the theory, I really fell in at the deep end there, but
    > >> learnt the trade quickly.
    > >>
    > >> Then MCSE 2000 the hard way, sit at home with two PC's
    > >> configured as servers with the New Riders series and
    > >> flogged my way through the exams.
    > >>
    > >> Now I am about to tackle MCSE 2003. (I'm lucky that my
    > >> family responsibilities have now grown up and look after
    > >> themselves.) but I do feel sorry for the younger

    > members
    > >> of our staff trying to keep up. New babies, young
    > >> children needing attention etc. and for what ? A skill
    > >> set that is only good for couple of years before the

    > next
    > >> generation of products requires more retraining and wage
    > >> levels considerably less than a skilled plumber and less
    > >> than I made ten years ago.
    > >>
    > >> I enjoy what I do the mental challenge of making systems
    > >> work and fixing the dead ones is stimulating, I love it,
    > >> but you kids out there who are looking at IT as a life
    > >> career, stop and rethink.
    > >>
    > >> I was part of team interviewing for a senior position
    > >> recently, six applicants, five of which were highly
    > >> skiled IT managers with excelent CV's, but none had up
    > >> graded from NT4, we are 100% Microsoft 2000. Most of

    > them
    > >> could not answer simple system questions, and lacked
    > >> awareness of the complete change that Windows 2000 was
    > >> from NT4 (the further you go into management the further
    > >> you get away from systems knowledge, I know, hence the
    > >> retraining) Who got the job? The MCSA with hands on
    > >> experience.
    > >>
    > >> Be warned though, systems integration means fewer
    > >> servers, more bandwidth means more people working from
    > >> home. Will remote administration mean out sourcing to
    > >> third world companies, hence lower wages and less skills
    > >> required on site? It is not hard to envisage though

    > times
    > >> ahead for many IT personnel. Best of luck people.
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >.
    > >
    roYal, Sep 9, 2003
    #5
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