Is your camera store Bass ackwards with Digital prints?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by JohnR66, Apr 28, 2005.

  1. JohnR66

    JohnR66 Guest

    Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and it is
    printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but digital
    files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji Frontier
    printer) and have to be picked up the next day. They do have the Fuji
    Finepix station at each location, but I'm not impressed with the quality. I
    like the traditional chemical prints much better.

    Rhetorical question, I guess. I know the cost of a digital lab is high, so
    they can't put one in every location. The delay seems backward to swiftness
    of digital photography.

    John
    JohnR66, Apr 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. JohnR66

    Guest

    I'm impressed with the prints Camera Corner here in Burlington, North
    Carolina does from digicams. Next-day service - and results that look
    just like 35mm color prints - at very reasonable price.
    It all depends on what you want. Are there good one-hour
    digicam-printing services in most places? I don't know. But you sure
    can get excellent prints faster than your local drugstore ever did ones
    from film.

    See the http://stores.ebay.com/INTERNET-GUN-SHOW
    , Apr 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. JohnR66

    Jim Townsend Guest

    JohnR66 wrote:

    > Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and it is
    > printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but digital
    > files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji Frontier
    > printer) and have to be picked up the next day. They do have the Fuji
    > Finepix station at each location, but I'm not impressed with the quality. I
    > like the traditional chemical prints much better.
    >
    > Rhetorical question, I guess. I know the cost of a digital lab is high, so
    > they can't put one in every location. The delay seems backward to swiftness
    > of digital photography.


    Get a better lab.. Many are still in transition from film to digital
    so all places won't be equal. I recall just three years ago.. Few
    photo outifts would even look at digital photos.

    I have an outlet that does good work (In Canada.. London Drugs). They
    have a Fuji printer at their store. I upload my photos in the morning,
    then go pick up the completed prints after lunch. It's a 15 minute trip.

    Not a bad deal..
    Jim Townsend, Apr 28, 2005
    #3
  4. JohnR66

    Ron Hunter Guest

    JohnR66 wrote:
    > Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and it is
    > printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but digital
    > files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji Frontier
    > printer) and have to be picked up the next day. They do have the Fuji
    > Finepix station at each location, but I'm not impressed with the quality. I
    > like the traditional chemical prints much better.
    >
    > Rhetorical question, I guess. I know the cost of a digital lab is high, so
    > they can't put one in every location. The delay seems backward to swiftness
    > of digital photography.
    >
    > John
    >
    >

    Find another store. Even the local Wal-Mart and CVS pharmacy stores can
    print digital in 1 hr. at their stores.


    --
    Ron Hunter
    Ron Hunter, Apr 28, 2005
    #4
  5. JohnR66

    Pete D Guest

    "JohnR66" <> wrote in message
    news:5%Vbe.658624$...
    > Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and it
    > is printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but
    > digital files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji
    > Frontier printer) and have to be picked up the next day. They do have the
    > Fuji Finepix station at each location, but I'm not impressed with the
    > quality. I like the traditional chemical prints much better.
    >
    > Rhetorical question, I guess. I know the cost of a digital lab is high, so
    > they can't put one in every location. The delay seems backward to
    > swiftness of digital photography.
    >
    > John
    >


    My local Teds Camera Store often does them in 15 minutes for me and does a
    first class job.
    Pete D, Apr 28, 2005
    #5
  6. There is only one lab in Iraklion that does digital printing directly, in 1
    hr.All others need you to give the card and pick them next morning.Even the
    famous battery-selling chain, www.germanos.gr does digital printing, with
    uploading, but not 1 hr.

    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
    FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker
    dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
    Ï "JohnR66" <> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá
    news:5%Vbe.658624$...
    > Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and it

    is
    > printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but digital
    > files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji Frontier
    > printer) and have to be picked up the next day. They do have the Fuji
    > Finepix station at each location, but I'm not impressed with the quality.

    I
    > like the traditional chemical prints much better.
    >
    > Rhetorical question, I guess. I know the cost of a digital lab is high, so
    > they can't put one in every location. The delay seems backward to

    swiftness
    > of digital photography.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    Dimitrios Tzortzakakis, Apr 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Just found this one, www.photoexperts.gr

    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
    FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker
    dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
    Ï "Dimitrios Tzortzakakis" <> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá
    news:d4qq89$5j1$...
    > There is only one lab in Iraklion that does digital printing directly, in

    1
    > hr.All others need you to give the card and pick them next morning.Even

    the
    > famous battery-selling chain, www.germanos.gr does digital printing, with
    > uploading, but not 1 hr.
    >
    > --
    > Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    > major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
    > FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker
    > dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
    > Ï "JohnR66" <> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá
    > news:5%Vbe.658624$...
    > > Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and

    it
    > is
    > > printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but

    digital
    > > files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji Frontier
    > > printer) and have to be picked up the next day. They do have the Fuji
    > > Finepix station at each location, but I'm not impressed with the

    quality.
    > I
    > > like the traditional chemical prints much better.
    > >
    > > Rhetorical question, I guess. I know the cost of a digital lab is high,

    so
    > > they can't put one in every location. The delay seems backward to

    > swiftness
    > > of digital photography.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Dimitrios Tzortzakakis, Apr 28, 2005
    #7
  8. "JohnR66" <> wrote in message
    news:5%Vbe.658624$...
    > Is your photofinisher this way? I can drop off a roll of 35mm film and it

    is
    > printed in about an hour at my local camera/photo store chain, but digital
    > files are sent off somewhere (to the location of their Fuji Frontier
    > printer) and have to be picked up the next day.


    That makes no sense. The printing process is the same for digital and film.
    The first thing that is done after the film is developed, is that it is
    digitized. With digital, it is already digitized.

    To get true chemical prints is something that you have to pay big bucks for,
    and it's done by specialty houses.
    Steven M. Scharf, Apr 28, 2005
    #8
  9. JohnR66

    james Guest

    In article <ur7ce.744$>,
    Steven M. Scharf <> wrote:

    >To get true chemical prints is something that you have to pay big bucks for,
    >and it's done by specialty houses.


    Really? I had not considered this, so I'm surprised that drugstore
    prints from film are not optical/chemical prints.

    So what kind of printers do they use? And are any consumer printers
    equivalent to them? (I'm looking at the Canon i9900 right now).

    Just curious, and particularly curious as to whether getting a printer
    is really a false economy.
    james, Apr 28, 2005
    #9
  10. "james" <> wrote in message
    news:u0ace.2711$_o.2098@fed1read03...
    > In article <ur7ce.744$>,
    > Steven M. Scharf <> wrote:
    >
    > >To get true chemical prints is something that you have to pay big bucks

    for,
    > >and it's done by specialty houses.

    >
    > Really? I had not considered this, so I'm surprised that drugstore
    > prints from film are not optical/chemical prints.
    >
    > So what kind of printers do they use?


    Laser

    >And are any consumer printers
    > equivalent to them? (I'm looking at the Canon i9900 right now).


    I don't think that there are any consumer printers that can compare.

    > Just curious, and particularly curious as to whether getting a printer
    > is really a false economy.


    It is unlikely that you could buy ink and paper for less than what someplace
    like Costco or Wal-Mart charges for prints. And of course the prints from a
    mini-lab will last much longer.
    Steven M. Scharf, Apr 28, 2005
    #10
  11. JohnR66

    Frank ess Guest

    Steven M. Scharf wrote:
    > "james" <> wrote in message
    > news:u0ace.2711$_o.2098@fed1read03...
    >> In article <ur7ce.744$>,
    >> Steven M. Scharf <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> To get true chemical prints is something that you have to pay big
    >>> bucks for, and it's done by specialty houses.

    >>
    >> Really? I had not considered this, so I'm surprised that drugstore
    >> prints from film are not optical/chemical prints.
    >>
    >> So what kind of printers do they use?

    >
    > Laser
    >
    >> And are any consumer printers
    >> equivalent to them? (I'm looking at the Canon i9900 right now).

    >
    > I don't think that there are any consumer printers that can compare.
    >
    >> Just curious, and particularly curious as to whether getting a
    >> printer is really a false economy.

    >
    > It is unlikely that you could buy ink and paper for less than what
    > someplace like Costco or Wal-Mart charges for prints. And of course
    > the prints from a mini-lab will last much longer.


    Another consideration is: if you have come to digital photography and
    morphed into an obsessive, as many do, adding home photo printing to
    your repertoire—any printer beyond the card-reading 4x6ers—you will be
    required to devote the remaining 20% of your waking hours to that
    pursuit, making a total of something in the neighborhood of 174% of
    available time.

    Plus which, things keep changing, and you will either watch them pass
    you by, or spend too much money on new stuff.

    It's best to assign keeping-up to the professionals, and keep a little
    True Art going on your desktop, if you _must_.

    --
    Frank ess
    Frank ess, Apr 28, 2005
    #11
  12. On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 12:04:21 -0700, in rec.photo.digital , "Frank ess"
    <> in <> wrote:

    >Steven M. Scharf wrote:
    >> "james" <> wrote in message
    >> news:u0ace.2711$_o.2098@fed1read03...
    >>> In article <ur7ce.744$>,
    >>> Steven M. Scharf <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> To get true chemical prints is something that you have to pay big
    >>>> bucks for, and it's done by specialty houses.
    >>>
    >>> Really? I had not considered this, so I'm surprised that drugstore
    >>> prints from film are not optical/chemical prints.
    >>>
    >>> So what kind of printers do they use?

    >>
    >> Laser
    >>
    >>> And are any consumer printers
    >>> equivalent to them? (I'm looking at the Canon i9900 right now).

    >>
    >> I don't think that there are any consumer printers that can compare.
    >>
    >>> Just curious, and particularly curious as to whether getting a
    >>> printer is really a false economy.

    >>
    >> It is unlikely that you could buy ink and paper for less than what
    >> someplace like Costco or Wal-Mart charges for prints. And of course
    >> the prints from a mini-lab will last much longer.

    >
    >Another consideration is: if you have come to digital photography and
    >morphed into an obsessive, as many do, adding home photo printing to
    >your repertoire—any printer beyond the card-reading 4x6ers—you will be
    >required to devote the remaining 20% of your waking hours to that
    >pursuit, making a total of something in the neighborhood of 174% of
    >available time.
    >
    >Plus which, things keep changing, and you will either watch them pass
    >you by, or spend too much money on new stuff.
    >
    >It's best to assign keeping-up to the professionals, and keep a little
    >True Art going on your desktop, if you _must_.


    One of the reasons I don't do my primary printing at home is that I
    know I will start obsessing about the paper. There are some many
    beautiful papers out there which can have such a wonderful affect on
    the print. I mean, how can I not have 5 different versions of that
    picture on my wall?


    --
    Matt Silberstein

    All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
    a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
    there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
    end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
    or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
    Matt Silberstein, Apr 28, 2005
    #12
  13. JohnR66

    bmast17 Guest

    >
    > Another consideration is: if you have come to digital photography and
    > morphed into an obsessive, as many do, adding home photo printing to
    > your repertoire—any printer beyond the card-reading 4x6ers—you will be
    > required to devote the remaining 20% of your waking hours to that
    > pursuit, making a total of something in the neighborhood of 174% of
    > available time.
    >
    > Plus which, things keep changing, and you will either watch them pass
    > you by, or spend too much money on new stuff.
    >
    > It's best to assign keeping-up to the professionals, and keep a little
    > True Art going on your desktop, if you _must_.
    >


    while I didn't do the math nor would I give this paper n A for killer
    english clarity(perhaps the author is an ESL student) .. I think the
    point is well made .......

    save yer time and money and get those prints ya really need .... at a
    shop or store that has those $50k+ printers ...........

    really ...... they are better .. and cheaper for most folks compared to
    owning and operating a home photo printer .....
    bmast17, Jul 3, 2005
    #13
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